Acidic Statin Use Linked to Increased Risk for Diabetes in Women and Men According to a U.S. Study

<span class="articleLocatio

n”>Cholesterol-lowering drugs known as statins may be linked to an increased risk of diabetes in middle-aged and older women and men, according to a U.S. study.

The study, published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, found that among the thousands of women and men looked at, those who reported using any kind of statin at the start of the six- to seven-year study that women were nearly 50 percent more likely and men 12 percent more likely to be diagnosed with diabetes than those not taking statins.

“Statin medication use in postmenopausal women is associated with an increased risk for diabetes mellitus,” wrote Yunsheng Ma of the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester, and his colleagues.

Knowing how to lower cholesterol naturally by reducing metabolic and dietary acid is now more important than ever due to the ever increasing reports of acidic negative side effects from using statin drugs. A new study published January 23, 2012 in the Archives of Internal Medicine (4), showed almost a 50% increase in developing diabetes in women and a 12% increase in developing diabetes in men who take statin drugs.

Dr Robert O. Young states, “cholesterol is created by the body to buffer or neutralize excess metabolic and dietary acids to protect the glands and organs that sustain life. In other words, cholersterol is good not bad and protects the body from sickness and dis-ease. And, finally, dietary, respiratory, environmental and metabolic acids are the true and only culprits that cause the symptoms of high blood pressure, obesity, low energy, artherosclerosis and diabetes.”

How to lower cholesterol naturally is the question millions of Americans suffering from statin drug side effects are asking. Now, a large study published just last week comprised of 153,000 women in their 50’s, 60’s and 70’s shows that taking statin drugs puts women at a much higher risk of developing diabetes. The authors looked at the question of increased diabetes in statin users in the Women’s Health Initiative observational analysis. During follow-up, more than 10,000 cases of diabetes were diagnosed. A lead author, Dr. Yunsheng Ma who led the study stated, “We found that statin therapy — statins of all types — were associated with a 48% increased risk for diabetes in women…and 10 to 12% increased risk for diabe tes in men…”.

To learn more about how to lower cholesterol, blood pressure and blood glucose naturally visit the educational site: http://www.articlesofhealth.blogspot.com and http://www.phmiracleliving.com/p-565-l-arginine-plus.aspx

Due to these ever increasing rates of side effects many doctors have solved the question of how to lower cholesterol naturally by lower dietary and metabolic acids by recommending an alternative to statin drugs called L-Arginine Plus, containing thirteen all natural ingredients including; ultra pure L–Arginine, L-Ornithine, L-Citrulline, Magnesium Chloride, CO-enzyme Q10, Resveratrol, Pomegranate, Grape Seed, Vitamin C, Viatmin D3, Vitamine K, Vitamin B6, Vitamin B9 and Vitamin B12, not only lowers cholesterol but also helps to lower high blood pressure and regulate blood sugars in diabetics. Visit http://www.phmiracleliving.com/p-565-l-arginine-plus.aspx, to learn more.

Sources:

1. Avorn J, Monette J, Lacour A, et al. Persistence of use of lipid-lowering medications. A cross-sectional study. JAMA. 1998;279:1458-1462,
2. Statin Use and Risk of Diabetes Mellitus in Postmenopausal Women in the Women’s Health Initiative, Annie L. Culver, BPharm; Ira S. Ockene, MD; et al. Arch Intern Med. January 23, 2012;172(2):144-152.

Read more: http://www.phmiracleliving.com/p-565-l-arginine-plus.aspx

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