Eat Avocado to Prevent and/or Reverse Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes and Cancer!

The Avocado – The Food of the Gods – The Banana – The Food of Monkeys

The avocado or the food of the GODS may be the perfect food.  It has higher potassium at 486mg compared to a banana at 358mg for helping to maintain the alkaline design of the body fluids, especially the blood, without all the acidic sugar content at 12.23 grams for a banana and less than a gram for an avocado.  Each 100 grams of avocado has 2 grams of protein and 14.66 grams of Oleic fat that helps to reduce dietary and metabolic acid and thus reduces the need for LDL cholesterol.  The big benefit of the avocado is the cancer preventing and reversing phytonutrients of Lutein and Zeazanathin at 271 ug compared to a banana which only has 22 ug.  There is no question that the avocado is a superior alkalizing and health promoting food.  I recommend eating at least 2 to 3 Haas avocados a day. And stay away from bananas – they are acidic.

The nutritional facts for a raw avocado.

Nutrition Facts
Avocados Raw All Commercial Varieties
Serving Size 100g
Calories 160
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 14.66g 23%
    Saturated Fat 2.126g 11%
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 7mg 0%
Total Carbohydrate 8.53g 3%
    Dietary Fiber 6.7g 27%
    Sugar 0.66g ~
Protein 2g ~
Vitamin A 3% Vitamin C 17%
Calcium 1% Iron 3%
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Vitamins   %DV
Vitamin A 146IU 3%
    Retinol equivalents 7μg ~
    Retinol 0μg ~
    Alpha-carotene 24μg ~
    Beta-carotene 62μg ~
    Beta-cryptoxanthin 28μg ~
Vitamin C 10mg 17%
Vitamin E 2.07mg 7%
Vitamin K 21μg 26%
Vitamin B12 0μg 0%
Thiamin 0.067mg 4%
Riboflavin 0.13mg 8%
Niacin 1.738mg 9%
Pantothenic acid 1.389mg 14%
Vitamin B6 0.257mg 13%
Folate 81μg 20%
    Folic Acid 0μg ~
    Food Folate 81μg ~
    Dietary Folate Equivalents 81μg ~
Choline 14.2mg ~
Lycopene 0μg ~
Lutein+zeazanthin 271μg ~
Minerals   %DV
Calcium 12mg 1%
Iron 0.55mg 3%
Magnesium 29mg 7%
Phosphorus 52mg 5%
Sodium 7mg 0%
Potassium 485mg 14%
Zinc 0.64mg 4%
Copper 0.19mg 10%
Manganese 0.142mg 7%
Selenium 0.4μg 1%
Water 73.23g ~
Ash 1.58g ~

Useful Stats
Percent of Daily Calorie Target
(2000 calories)
8%
Percent Water Composition 73.23%
Protein to Carb Ratio (g/g) 0.23g

Health Benefits of Avocados:

  • Supports Immune Function
  • Reduced Cancer Risk
  • Protection Against Heart Disease
  • Regulation of Blood Sugar and Insulin Dependence
  • Reduces acids and thus the progression of AIDS
  • Slowing Aging
  • DNA Repair and Protection
  • Alleviation of Cardiovascular Disease
  • Alleviation of Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)
  • Alzheimer’s Protection
  • Osteoporosis Protection
  • Stroke Prevention
  • Reduced Risk of Type I and II Diabetes
  • Reduced Frequency of Migraine Headaches
  • Alleviation of Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS)
  • Antioxidant or Anti-acid Protection
  • Prevention of Epileptic Seizures
  • Prevention of Alopecia (Spot Baldness)
  • Avocados are high in monounsaturated “good for your heart” fats. Oleic acid in particular is known to reduce dietary and metabolic acids and thus lowering LDL cholesterol. 
  • High in alkaline buffers of potassium and Oleic oil to help maintain the alkaline design of the blood, tissues, organs and glands.

The nutritional facts for a raw banana. 

Nutrition Facts
Bananas Raw
Serving Size 100g
Calories 89
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.33g 1%
    Saturated Fat 0.112g 1%
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 1mg 0%
Total Carbohydrate 22.84g 8%
    Dietary Fiber 2.6g 10%
    Sugar 12.23g ~
Protein 1.09g ~
Vitamin A 1% Vitamin C 15%
Calcium 1% Iron 1%
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Vitamins   %DV
Vitamin A 64IU 1%
    Retinol equivalents 3μg ~
    Retinol 0μg ~
    Alpha-carotene 25μg ~
    Beta-carotene 26μg ~
    Beta-cryptoxanthin 0μg ~
Vitamin C 8.7mg 15%
Vitamin E 0.1mg 0%
Vitamin K 0.5μg 1%
Vitamin B12 0μg 0%
Thiamin 0.031mg 2%
Riboflavin 0.073mg 4%
Niacin 0.665mg 3%
Pantothenic acid 0.334mg 3%
Vitamin B6 0.367mg 18%
Folate 20μg 5%
    Folic Acid 0μg ~
    Food Folate 20μg ~
    Dietary Folate Equivalents 20μg ~
Choline 9.8mg ~
Lycopene 0μg ~
Lutein+zeazanthin 22μg ~
Minerals   %DV
Calcium 5mg 1%
Iron 0.26mg 1%
Magnesium 27mg 7%
Phosphorus 22mg 2%
Sodium 1mg 0%
Potassium 358mg 10%
Zinc 0.15mg 1%
Copper 0.078mg 4%
Manganese 0.27mg 14%
Selenium 1μg 1%
Water 74.91g ~
Ash 0.82g ~

Useful Stats
Percent of Daily Calorie Target
(2000 calories)
4.45%
Percent Water Composition 74.91%
Protein to Carb Ratio (g/g) 0.05g

Because of the high acid levels or sugar levels that increases tissue acidosis and the low fat levels that would help to reduce tissue acidosis I do not recommend eating banana.  The banana is high in potassium at 358 mgs. but is negated by the high sugar content causing a loss all of its alkalizing potential and making it a highly acidic fruit.  The banana is NOT a Superfood and is acidifying to the blood and tissues.  Its lutein content is only 22 ug compared to the Avocado at 271 ug.
To order your organically grown Haas avocados and Haas avocado oils go to:  http://phmiracleliving.com/c-5-food.aspx

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