Sing Your Way To a Long and Healthy Life!

I Love To Sing -  It Makes My Heart Happy!
I Love To Sing – It Makes My Heart Happy! 

Singing Daily Reduces Stress, Clears Sinuses, and Helps YOU Live Longer

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cODGupi1ir8&t=14s

Music makes everything better! It can relieve pain, reduces stress, makes you work harder, and helps you relax. Music is one of life’s most beautiful gifts.

Jimi Hendrix had this to say about music, “music doesn’t lie”. If there is something to be changed in this world, then it can happen through music.

 

One of the best ways to capture the benefits of music is through singing. It allows you to truly feel the song with your mind, body, and soul.

Research has shown singing can improve your health, increase happiness and even extend your life!

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2013.00334/full

No matter who or where you are, you can reap the many benefits of music by singing along to some tunes! Sing wherever you are.

“Singing is good for your brain and can make you feel high. All I know is it makes me happy and gives me a greater sense of gratitude and love for God, family and friends”. Dr. Robert O. Young

 

https://m.starmakerstudios.com/share?recording_id=4785074259088880&share_type=fb&app=sm

It releases endorphins, hormones that produce pleasure, simultaneous to oxytocin, hormones that diminish stress and anxiety.

Oxytocin also decreases feelings of depression and loneliness, making us feel more connected with the world, which is precisely why singing with other people feels even better!

A study done by scientists at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden found people who sing together become so connected they exhibit synchronized heartbeats.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/health/10168914/All-together-now-singing-is-good-for-your-body-and-soul.html

 

Anyone who has ever been in choir can attest to this. When the magical sound of several people singing together is created, there is an unexplained unity between those singing.

Singing also requires deep concentration on breathing, which works major muscle groups in the upper body and is great for both lung and cardiovascular health.

Björn Vickhoff, the leader of the study, stated:

“Song is a form of regular, controlled breathing, since breathing out occurs on the song phrases and inhaling takes place between these. It gives you pretty much the same effect as yoga breathing. It helps you relax, and there are indications that it does provide a heart benefit.”

Therefore, one could make the argument that singing is better for you than doing yoga!

Research has also proven that singing produces lower levels of cortisol, reducing stress while improving our immune systems.

Lastly, a joint study from Harvard and Yale Universities in 2008 found singing increases life expectancy. If you want to feel less stressed, become happier, and live longer: Start singing!

 

Do you want to stress less, sleep better, and feel abundantly happier… without drugs or anything crazy?

Start Singing!

http://www.drrobertyoung.com

http://www.phmiracleretreat.com

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