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Scientific Evidence for The pH Miracle Lifestyle and Diet!

The Alkaline pH Miracle Diet: Is There Any Published Scientific Evidence Substantiating Any Health Benefits for Dr. Robert O. Young’s Plant-Based, Vegan, Alkaline, pH Miracle Lifestyle and Diet?
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Gerry K. Schwalfenberg *

Abstract

This review looks at the role of an alkaline diet in health. Pubmed was searched looking for articles on pH, potential renal acid loads, bone health, muscle, growth hormone, back pain, vitamin D and chemotherapy. Many books written in the lay literature on the alkaline diet were also reviewed and evaluated in light of the published medical literature. There may be some value in considering an alkaline diet in reducing morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases and further studies are warranted in this area of medicine.

1. Background

Life on earth depends on appropriate pH levels in and around living organisms and cells. Human life requires a tightly controlled pH level in the serum of about 7.4 (a slightly alkaline range of 7.35 to 7.45) to survive [1].

As a comparison, in the past 100 years with increasing industrialization, the pH of the ocean has dropped from 8.2 to 8.1 because of increasing CO2 deposition. This has a negative impact on life in the ocean [1, 2] and may lead to the collapse of the coral reefs [3]. Even the pH of the soil in which plants are grown can have considerable influence on the mineral content of the food we eat (as minerals are used as buffers to maintain pH). The ideal pH of soil for the best overall availability of essential nutrients is between 6 and 7. Acidic soils below pH of 6 may have reduced calcium and magnesium, and soil above pH 7 may result in chemically unavailable iron, manganese, copper and zinc. Adding dolomite and manure are ways of raising pH in an acid soil environment when the pH is below 6 [4].

When it comes to the pH and net acid load in the human diet, there has been considerable change from the hunter gather civilization to the present [5]. With the agricultural revolution (last 10,000 years) and even more recently with industrialization (last 200 years), there has been an decrease in potassium (K) compared to sodium (Na) and an increase in chloride compared to bicarbonate found in the diet [6]. The ratio of potassium to sodium has reversed, K/Na previously was 10 to 1 whereas the modern diet has a ratio of 1 to 3 [7]. It is generally accepted that agricultural humans today have a diet poor in magnesium and potassium as well as fiber and rich in saturated fat, simple sugars, sodium, and chloride as compared to the preagricultural period [6]. This results in a diet that may induce metabolic acidosis which is mismatched to the genetically determined nutritional requirements [8]. With aging, there is a gradual loss of renal acid-base regulatory function and a resultant increase in diet-induced metabolic acidosis while on the modern diet [9]. A low-carbohydrate high-protein diet with its increased acid load results in very little change in blood chemistry, and pH, but results in many changes in urinary chemistry. Urinary magnesium levels, urinary citrate and pH are decreased, urinary calcium, undissociated uric acid, and phosphate are increased. All of these result in an increased risk for kidney stones [10].

Much has been written in the lay literature as well as many online sites expounding on the benefits of the alkaline diet. This paper is an attempt to balance the evidence that is found in the scientific literature.

2. The Role of pH in Various Cells, Organs, and Membranes

The pH in our body may vary considerably from one area to another with the highest acidity in the stomach (pH of 1.35 to 3.5) to aid in digestion and protect against opportunistic microbial organisms. But even in the stomach, the layer just outside the epithelium is quite basic to prevent mucosal injury. It has been suggested that decreased gastric lining secretion of bicarbonates and a decrease in the alkaline/acid secretion in duodenal ulcer patients may play a significant role in duodenal ulcers [11]. The skin is quite acidic (pH 4–6.5) to provide an acid mantle as a protective barrier to the environment against microbial overgrowth. There is a gradient from the outer horny layer (pH 4) to the basal layer (pH 6.9) [12]. This is also seen in the vagina where a pH of less than 4.7 protects against microbial overgrowth [13].

The urine may have a variable pH from acid to alkaline depending on the need for balancing the internal environment. Acid excretion in the urine can be estimated by a formula described by Remer (sulfate + chloride + 1.8x phosphate + organic acids) minus (sodium + potassium + 2x calcium + 2x magnesium) mEq [14]. Foods can be categorized by the potential renal acid loads (PRALs) see Table 2. Fruits, vegetables, fruit juices, potatoes, and alkali-rich and low phosphorus beverages (red and white wine, mineral soda waters) having a negative acid load. Whereas, grain products, meats, dairy products, fish, and alkali poor and low phosphorus beverages (e.g., pale beers, cocoa) have relatively high acid loads [15].

Measurement of pH of the urine (reviewed in a recent study with two morning specimens done over a five-year span) did not predict bone fractures or loss of bone mineral density [16]. However, this may not be reflective of being on an alkaline or acid diet throughout this time. For more details, see Table 1.

Table 1
PH of selected fluids, organs, and membranes.

Table 2
Potential renal acid loads (PRALs) of selected foods [20].

3. Chronic Acidosis and Bone Disease

Calcium in the form of phosphates and carbonates represents a large reservoir of base in our body. In response to an acid load such as the modern diet these salts are released into the systemic circulation to bring about pH homeostasis [7]. It has been estimated that the quantity of calcium lost in the urine with the modern diet over time could be as high as almost 480gm over 20 years or almost half the skeletal mass of calcium [21]. However, urinary losses of calcium are not a direct measure of osteoporosis. There are many regulatory factors that may compensate for the urinary calcium loss. When the arterial pH is in the normal range, a mild reduction of plasma bicarbonate results in a negative calcium balance which could benefit from supplementing bicarbonate in the form of potassium bicarbonate [22]. It has been found that bicarbonate, which increases the alkali content of a diet, but not potassium may attenuate bone loss in healthy older adults [23]. The bone minerals that are wasted in the urine may not have complete compensation through intestinal absorption, which is thought to result in osteoporosis. However, adequate vitamin D with a 25(OH)D level of >80nmol/L may allow for appropriate intestinal absorption of calcium and magnesium and phosphate when needed [24]. Sadly, most populations are generally deficient in vitamin D especially in northern climates [25]. In chronic renal failure, correction of metabolic acidosis with bicarbonate significantly improves parathyroid levels and levels of the active form of vitamin D 1,25(OH)2D3 [26].

Recently, a study has shown the importance of phosphate in Remer’s PRAL formula. According to the formula it would be expected that an increase in phosphate should result in an increase in urinary calcium loss and a negative calcium balance in bone [27]. It should be noted that supplementation with phosphate in patients with bed rest reduced urinary calcium excretion but did not prevent bone loss [28]. The most recent systematic review and meta-analysis has shown that calcium balance is maintained and improved with phosphate which is quite contrary to the acid-ash hypothesis [29]. As well a recent study looking at soda intake (which has a significant amount of phosphate) and osteoporosis in postmenopausal American first nations women did not find a correlation [30]. It is quite possible that the high acid content according to Remer’s classification needs to be looked at again in light of compensatory phosphate intake. There is online information promoting an alkaline diet for bone health as well as a number of books. However, a recent systematic review of the literature looking for evidence supporting the alkaline diet for bone health found no protective role of dietary acid load in osteoporosis [31].

Another element of the modern diet is the excess of sodium in the diet. There is evidence that in healthy humans the increased sodium in the diet can predict the degree of hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis when consuming a net acid producing diet [32]. As well, there is evidence that there are adverse effects of sodium chloride in the aging population. A high sodium diet will exacerbate disuse-induced bone and muscle loss during immobilization by increasing bone resorption and protein wasting [33]. Excess dietary sodium has been shown to result in hypertension and osteoporosis in women [34, 35]. As well, dietary potassium which is lacking in the modern diet would modulate pressor and hypercalciuric effects of excess of sodium chloride [36].

Excess dietary protein with high acid renal load may decrease bone density if not buffered by ingestion of supplements or foods that are alkali rich [37]. However, adequate protein is necessary for prevention of osteoporosis and sarcopenia; therefore, increasing the amount of fruit and vegetables may be necessary rather than reducing protein [38].

4. Alkaline Diets and Muscle

As we age, there is a loss of muscle mass, which may predispose to falls and fractures. A three-year study looking at a diet rich in potassium, such as fruits and vegetables, as well as a reduced acid load, resulted in preservation of muscle mass in older men and women [39]. Conditions such as chronic renal failure that result in chronic metabolic acidosis result in accelerated breakdown in skeletal muscle [40]. Correction of acidosis may preserve muscle mass in conditions where muscle wasting is common such as diabetic ketosis, trauma, sepsis, chronic obstructive lung disease, and renal failure [41]. In situations that result in acute acidosis, supplementing younger patients with sodium bicarbonate prior to exhaustive exercise resulted in significantly less acidosis in the blood than those that were not supplemented with sodium bicarbonate [42].

5. Alkaline Supplementation and Growth Hormone

It has long been known that severe forms of metabolic acidosis in children, such as renal tubular acidosis, are associated with low levels of growth hormone with resultant short stature. Correction of the acidosis with bicarbonate [7] or potassium citrate [43] increases growth hormone significantly and improved growth. The use of enough potassium bicarbonate in the diet to neutralize the daily net acid load in postmenopausal women resulted in a significant increase in growth hormone and resultant osteocalcin [44]. Improving growth hormone levels may improve quality of life, reduce cardiovascular risk factors, improve body composition, and even improve memory and cognition [45]. As well this results in a reduction of urinary calcium loss equivalent to 5% of bone calcium content over a period of 3 years [46].

6. Alkaline Diet and Back Pain

There is some evidence that chronic low back pain improves with the supplementation of alkaline minerals [47]. With supplementation there was a slight but significant increase in blood pH and intracellular magnesium. Ensuring that there is enough intracellular magnesium allows for the proper function of enzyme systems and also allows for activation of vitamin D [48]. This in turn has been shown to improve back pain [49].

7. Alkalinity and Chemotherapy

The effectiveness of chemotherapeutic agents is markedly influenced by pH. Numerous agents such as epirubicin and adriamycin require an alkaline media to be more effective. Others, such as cisplatin, mitomycin C, and thiotepa, are more cytotoxic in an acid media [50]. Cell death correlates with acidosis and intracellular pH shifts higher (more alkaline) after chemotherapy may reflect response to chemotherapy [51]. It has been suggested that inducing metabolic alkalosis may be useful in enhancing some treatment regimes by using sodium bicarbonate, carbicab, and furosemide [52]. Extracellular alkalinization by using bicarbonate may result in improvements in therapeutic effectiveness [53]. There is no scientific literature establishing the benefit of an alkaline diet for the prevention of cancer at this time.

8. Discussion

The human body has an amazing ability to maintain a steady pH in the blood with the main compensatory mechanisms being renal and respiratory. Many of the membranes in our body require an acid pH to protect us and to help us digest food. It has been suggested that an alkaline diet may prevent a number of diseases and result in significant health benefits. Looking at the above discussion on bone health alone, certain aspects have doubtful benefit. There does not seem to be enough evidence that milk or cheese may be as detrimental as Remer’s formula suggests since phosphate does benefit bone health and result in a positive calcium balance. However, another mechanism for the alkaline diet to benefit bone health may be the increase in growth hormone and resultant increase in osteocalcin. There is some evidence that the K/Na ratio does matter and that the significant amount of salt in our diet is detrimental. Even some governments are demanding that the food industry reduce the salt load in our diet. High-protein diets may also affect bone health but some protein is also needed for good bone health.

Muscle wasting however seems to be reduced with an alkaline diet and back pain may benefit from this as well. An alkaline environment may improve the efficacy of some chemotherapy agents but not others.

9. Conclusion

Alkaline diets result in a more alkaline urine pH and may result in reduced calcium in the urine, however, as seen in some recent reports, this may not reflect total calcium balance because of other buffers such as phosphate. There is no substantial evidence that this improves bone health or protects from osteoporosis. However, alkaline diets may result in a number of health benefits as outlined below:

– Increased fruits and vegetables in an alkaline diet would improve the K/Na ratio and may benefit bone health, reduce muscle wasting, as well as mitigate other chronic diseases such as hypertension and strokes.
The resultant increase in growth hormone with an alkaline diet may improve many outcomes from cardiovascular health to memory and cognition.

– An increase in intracellular magnesium, which is required for the function of many enzyme systems, is another added benefit of the alkaline diet. Available magnesium, which is required to activate vitamin D, would result in numerous added benefits in the vitamin D apocrine/exocrine systems.
Alkalinity may result in added benefit for some chemotherapeutic agents that require a higher pH.

From the evidence outlined above, it would be prudent to consider an alkaline diet to reduce morbidity and mortality of chronic disease that are plaguing our aging population. One of the first considerations in an alkaline diet, which includes more fruits and vegetables, is to know what type of soil they were grown in since this may significantly influence the mineral content. At this time, there are limited scientific studies in this area, and many more studies are indicated in regards to muscle effects, growth hormone, and interaction with vitamin D.

References

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80nmol/L may allow for appropriate intestinal absorption of calcium and magnesium and phosphate when needed [24]. Sadly, most populations are generally deficient in vitamin D especially in northern climates [25]. In chronic renal failure, correction of metabolic acidosis with bicarbonate significantly improves parathyroid levels and levels of the active form of vitamin D 1,25(OH)2D3 [26]. Recently, a study has shown the importance of phosphate in Remer’s PRAL formula. According to the formula it would be expected that an increase in phosphate should result in an increase in urinary calcium loss and a negative calcium balance in bone [27]. It should be noted that supplementation with phosphate in patients with bed rest reduced urinary calcium excretion but did not prevent bone loss [28]. The most recent systematic review and meta-analysis has shown that calcium balance is maintained and improved with phosphate which is quite contrary to the acid-ash hypothesis [29]. As well a recent study looking at soda intake (which has a significant amount of phosphate) and osteoporosis in postmenopausal American first nations women did not find a correlation [30]. It is quite possible that the high acid content according to Remer’s classification needs to be looked at again in light of compensatory phosphate intake. There is online information promoting an alkaline diet for bone health as well as a number of books. However, a recent systematic review of the literature looking for evidence supporting the alkaline diet for bone health found no protective role of dietary acid load in osteoporosis [31]. Another element of the modern diet is the excess of sodium in the diet. There is evidence that in healthy humans the increased sodium in the diet can predict the degree of hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis when consuming a net acid producing diet [32]. As well, there is evidence that there are adverse effects of sodium chloride in the aging population. A high sodium diet will exacerbate disuse-induced bone and muscle loss during immobilization by increasing bone resorption and protein wasting [33]. Excess dietary sodium has been shown to result in hypertension and osteoporosis in women [34, 35]. As well, dietary potassium which is lacking in the modern diet would modulate pressor and hypercalciuric effects of excess of sodium chloride [36]. Excess dietary protein with high acid renal load may decrease bone density if not buffered by ingestion of supplements or foods that are alkali rich [37]. However, adequate protein is necessary for prevention of osteoporosis and sarcopenia; therefore, increasing the amount of fruit and vegetables may be necessary rather than reducing protein [38]. 4. Alkaline Diets and Muscle As we age, there is a loss of muscle mass, which may predispose to falls and fractures. A three-year study looking at a diet rich in potassium, such as fruits and vegetables, as well as a reduced acid load, resulted in preservation of muscle mass in older men and women [39]. Conditions such as chronic renal failure that result in chronic metabolic acidosis result in accelerated breakdown in skeletal muscle [40]. Correction of acidosis may preserve muscle mass in conditions where muscle wasting is common such as diabetic ketosis, trauma, sepsis, chronic obstructive lung disease, and renal failure [41]. In situations that result in acute acidosis, supplementing younger patients with sodium bicarbonate prior to exhaustive exercise resulted in significantly less acidosis in the blood than those that were not supplemented with sodium bicarbonate [42]. 5. Alkaline Supplementation and Growth Hormone It has long been known that severe forms of metabolic acidosis in children, such as renal tubular acidosis, are associated with low levels of growth hormone with resultant short stature. Correction of the acidosis with bicarbonate [7] or potassium citrate [43] increases growth hormone significantly and improved growth. The use of enough potassium bicarbonate in the diet to neutralize the daily net acid load in postmenopausal women resulted in a significant increase in growth hormone and resultant osteocalcin [44]. Improving growth hormone levels may improve quality of life, reduce cardiovascular risk factors, improve body composition, and even improve memory and cognition [45]. As well this results in a reduction of urinary calcium loss equivalent to 5% of bone calcium content over a period of 3 years [46]. 6. Alkaline Diet and Back Pain There is some evidence that chronic low back pain improves with the supplementation of alkaline minerals [47]. With supplementation there was a slight but significant increase in blood pH and intracellular magnesium. Ensuring that there is enough intracellular magnesium allows for the proper function of enzyme systems and also allows for activation of vitamin D [48]. This in turn has been shown to improve back pain [49]. 7. Alkalinity and Chemotherapy The effectiveness of chemotherapeutic agents is markedly influenced by pH. Numerous agents such as epirubicin and adriamycin require an alkaline media to be more effective. Others, such as cisplatin, mitomycin C, and thiotepa, are more cytotoxic in an acid media [50]. Cell death correlates with acidosis and intracellular pH shifts higher (more alkaline) after chemotherapy may reflect response to chemotherapy [51]. It has been suggested that inducing metabolic alkalosis may be useful in enhancing some treatment regimes by using sodium bicarbonate, carbicab, and furosemide [52]. Extracellular alkalinization by using bicarbonate may result in improvements in therapeutic effectiveness [53]. There is no scientific literature establishing the benefit of an alkaline diet for the prevention of cancer at this time. 8. Discussion The human body has an amazing ability to maintain a steady pH in the blood with the main compensatory mechanisms being renal and respiratory. Many of the membranes in our body require an acid pH to protect us and to help us digest food. It has been suggested that an alkaline diet may prevent a number of diseases and result in significant health benefits. Looking at the above discussion on bone health alone, certain aspects have doubtful benefit. There does not seem to be enough evidence that milk or cheese may be as detrimental as Remer’s formula suggests since phosphate does benefit bone health and result in a positive calcium balance. However, another mechanism for the alkaline diet to benefit bone health may be the increase in growth hormone and resultant increase in osteocalcin. There is some evidence that the K/Na ratio does matter and that the significant amount of salt in our diet is detrimental. Even some governments are demanding that the food industry reduce the salt load in our diet. High-protein diets may also affect bone health but some protein is also needed for good bone health. Muscle wasting however seems to be reduced with an alkaline diet and back pain may benefit from this as well. An alkaline environment may improve the efficacy of some chemotherapy agents but not others. 9. Conclusion Alkaline diets result in a more alkaline urine pH and may result in reduced calcium in the urine, however, as seen in some recent reports, this may not reflect total calcium balance because of other buffers such as phosphate. There is no substantial evidence that this improves bone health or protects from osteoporosis. However, alkaline diets may result in a number of health benefits as outlined below: – Increased fruits and vegetables in an alkaline diet would improve the K/Na ratio and may benefit bone health, reduce muscle wasting, as well as mitigate other chronic diseases such as hypertension and strokes. The resultant increase in growth hormone with an alkaline diet may improve many outcomes from cardiovascular health to memory and cognition. – An increase in intracellular magnesium, which is required for the function of many enzyme systems, is another added benefit of the alkaline diet. Available magnesium, which is required to activate vitamin D, would result in numerous added benefits in the vitamin D apocrine/exocrine systems. Alkalinity may result in added benefit for some chemotherapeutic agents that require a higher pH. From the evidence outlined above, it would be prudent to consider an alkaline diet to reduce morbidity and mortality of chronic disease that are plaguing our aging population. One of the first considerations in an alkaline diet, which includes more fruits and vegetables, is to know what type of soil they were grown in since this may significantly influence the mineral content. At this time, there are limited scientific studies in this area, and many more studies are indicated in regards to muscle effects, growth hormone, and interaction with vitamin D. References 1. Waugh A, Grant A. Anatomy and Physiology in Health and Illness. 10th edition. Philadelphia, Pa, USA: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier; 2007. 2. University, Birmingham oAa. Oceans reveal further impacts of climate change. ScienceDaily, 2010. 3. Hoegh-Guldberg O, Mumby PJ, Hooten AJ, et al. Coral reefs under rapid climate change and ocean acidification. Science. 2007;318(5857):1737–1742. [PubMed] 4. Dam-ampai SO J, Nilnond C. Effect of cattle manure and dolomite on soil properties and plant growth in acid upland soils. Songklanakarin Journal of Science and Technologh. 2005;27(supplement 3):727–737. 5. Ströhle A, Hahn A, Sebastian A. Estimation of the diet-dependent net acid load in 229 worldwide historically studied hunter-gatherer societies. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2010;91(2):406–412. [PubMed] 6. Sebastian A, Frassetto LA, Sellmeyer DE, Merriam RL, Morris RC., Jr. Estimation of the net acid load of the diet of ancestral preagricultural Homo sapiens and their hominid ancestors. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2002;76(6):1308–1316. [PubMed] 7. Frassetto L, Morris, Jr. R.C. RC, Jr., Sellmeyer DE, Todd K, Sebastian A. Diet, evolution and aging—the pathophysiologic effects of the post-agricultural inversion of the potassium-to-sodium and base-to-chloride ratios in the human diet. European Journal of Nutrition. 2001;40(5):200–213. [PubMed] 8. Konner M, Boyd Eaton S. Paleolithic nutrition: twenty-five years later. Nutrition in Clinical Practice. 2010;25(6):594–602. [PubMed] 9. Lindeman RD, Goldman R. Anatomic and physiologic age changes in the kidney. Experimental Gerontology. 1986;21(4-5):379–406. [PubMed] 10. Reddy ST, Wang CY, Sakhaee K, Brinkley L, Pak CY. Effect of low-carbohydrate high-protein diets on acid-base balance, stone-forming propensity, and calcium metabolism. American Journal of Kidney Diseases. 2002;40(2):265–274. [PubMed] 11. Malov YS, Kulikov AN. Bicarbonate deficiency and duodenal ulcer. Terapevticheskii Arkhiv. 1998;70(2):28–32. [PubMed] 12. Ohman H, Vahlquist A. In vivo studies concerning a pH gradient in human stratum corneum and upper epidermis. Acta Dermato-Venereologica. 1994;74(5):375–379. [PubMed] 13. Ferris DG, Francis SL, Dickman ED, Miler-Miles K, Waller JL, McClendon N. Variability of vaginal pH determination by patients and clinicians. Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine. 2006;19(4):368–373. [PubMed] 14. Remer T, Manz F. Estimation of the renal net acid excretion by adults consuming diets containing variable amounts of protein. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1994;59(6):1356–1361. [PubMed] 15. Remer T. Influence of diet on acid-base balance. Seminars in Dialysis. 2000;13(4):221–226. [PubMed] 16. Fenton TR, Eliasziw M, Tough SC, Lyon AW, Brown JP, Hanley DA. Low urine pH and acid excretion do not predict bone fractures or the loss of bone mineral density: a prospective cohort study. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders. 2010;11, article 88 [PMC free article] [PubMed] 17. Boelsma E, van de Vijver LPL, Goldbohm RA, Klöpping-Ketelaars IAA, Hendriks HFJ, Roza L. Human skin condition and its associations with nutrient concentrations in serum and diet. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2003;77(2):348–355. [PubMed] 18. Ince BA, Anderson EJ, Neer RM. Lowering dietary protein to U.S. recommended dietary allowance levels reduces urinary calcium excretion and bone resorption in young women. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2004;89(8):3801–3807. [PubMed] 19. Boron WF. Regulation of intracellular pH. Advances in Physiology Education. 2004;28:160–179. [PubMed] 20. Remer T, Manz F. Potential renal acid load of foods and its influence on urine pH. Journal of the American Dietetic Association. 1995;95(7):791–797. [PubMed] 21. Fenton TR, Eliasziw M, Lyon AW, Tough SC, Hanley DA. Meta-analysis of the quantity of calcium excretion associated with the net acid excretion of the modern diet under the acid-ash diet hypothesis. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2008;88(4):1159–1166. [PubMed] 22. Sebastian A, Morris RC., Jr. Improved mineral balance and skeletal metabolism in postmenopausal women treated with potassium bicarbonate. New England Journal of Medicine. 1994;331(4):p. 279. [PubMed] 23. Dawson-Hughes B, Harris SS, Palermo NJ, Castaneda-Sceppa C, Rasmussen HM, Dallal GE. Treatment with potassium bicarbonate lowers calcium excretion and bone resorption in older men and women. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2009;94(1):96–102. [PMC free article] [PubMed] 24. Heaney RP, Dowell MS, Hale CA, Bendich A. Calcium absorption varies within the reference range for serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Journal of the American College of Nutrition. 2003;22(2):142–146. [PubMed] 25. Schwalfenberg GK, Genuis SJ, Hiltz MN. Addressing vitamin D deficiency in Canada: a public health innovation whose time has come. Public Health. 2010;124(6):350–359. [PubMed] 26. Lu KC, Lin SH, Yu FC, Chyr SH, Shieh SD. Influence of metabolic acidosis on serum 1,25(OH)2D3 levels in chronic renal failure. Mineral and Electrolyte Metabolism. 1995;21(6):398–402. [PubMed] 27. Fenton TR, Lyon AW, Eliasziw M, Tough SC, Hanley DA. Phosphate decreases urine calcium and increases calcium balance: a meta-analysis of the osteoporosis acid-ash diet hypothesis. Nutrition Journal. 2009;8, article 41 [PMC free article] [PubMed] 28. Hulley SB, Vogel JM, Donaldson CL, Bayers JH, Friedman RJ, Rosen SN. The effect of supplemental oral phosphate on the bone mineral changes during prolonged bed rest. Journal of Clinical Investigation. 1971;50(12):2506–2518. [PMC free article] [PubMed] 29. Fenton TR, Lyon AW, Eliasziw M, Tough SC, Hanley DA. Meta-analysis of the effect of the acid-ash hypothesis of osteoporosis on calcium balance. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. 2009;24(11):1835–1840. [PubMed] 30. Supplee JD, Duncan GE, Bruemmer B, Goldberg J, Wen Y, Henderson JA. Soda intake and osteoporosis risk in postmenopausal American-Indian women. Public Health Nutrition. 2011:1–7. [PubMed] 31. Fenton TR, Tough SC, Lyon AW, Eliasziw M, Hanley DA. Causal assessment of dietary acid load and bone disease: a systematic review & meta-analysis applying Hill’s epidemiologic criteria for causality. Nutrition Journal. 2011;10(1, article 41) [PMC free article] [PubMed] 32. Frassetto LA, Morris RC, Jr., Sebastian A. Dietary sodium chloride intake independently predicts the degree of hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis in healthy humans consuming a net acid-producing diet. American Journal of Physiology—Renal Physiology. 2007;293(2):F521–F525. [PubMed] 33. Frings-Meuthen P, Buehlmeier J, Baecker N, et al. High sodium chloride intake exacerbates immobilization-induced bone resorption and protein losses. Journal of Applied Physiology. 2011;111(2):537–542. [PubMed] 34. Cappuccio FP, Meilahn E, Zmuda JM, Cauley JA. High blood pressure and bone-mineral loss in elderly white women: a prospective study. Lancet. 1999;354(9183):971–975. [PubMed] 35. Devine A, Criddle RA, Dick IM, Kerr DA, Prince RL. A longitudinal study of the effect of sodium and calcium intakes on regional bone density in postmenopausal women. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1995;62(4):740–745. [PubMed] 36. Morris RC, Jr., Schmidlin O, Frassetto LA, Sebastian A. Relationship and interaction between sodium and potassium. Journal of the American College of Nutrition. 2006;25(3):262S–270S. [PubMed] 37. Barzel US, Massey LK. Excess dietary protein may can adversely affect bone. Journal of Nutrition. 1998;128(6):1051–1053. [PubMed] 38. Heaney RP, Layman DK. Amount and type of protein influences bone health. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2008;87(5):156S–157S. [PubMed] 39. Dawson-Hughes B, Harris SS, Ceglia L. Alkaline diets favor lean tissue mass in older adults. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2008;87(3):662–665. [PMC free article] [PubMed] 40. Garibotto G, Russo R, Sofia A, et al. Muscle protein turnover in chronic renal failure patients with metabolic acidosis or normal acid-base balance. Mineral and Electrolyte Metabolism. 1996;22(1–3):58–61. [PubMed] 41. Caso G, Garlick PJ. Control of muscle protein kinetics by acid-base balance. Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care. 2005;8(1):73–76. [PubMed] 42. Webster MJ, Webster MN, Crawford RE, Gladden LB. Effect of sodium bicarbonate ingestion on exhaustive resistance exercise performance. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 1993;25(8):960–965. [PubMed] 43. McSherry E, Morris RC., Jr. Attainment and maintenance of normal stature with alkali therapy in infants and children with classic renal tubular acidosis. Journal of Clinical Investigation. 1978;61(2):509–527. [PMC free article] [PubMed] 44. Frassetto L, Morris RC, Jr., Sebastian A. Potassium bicarbonate reduces urinary nitrogen excretion in postmenopausal women. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 1997;82(1):254–259. [PubMed] 45. Wass JAH, Reddy R. Growth hormone and memory. Journal of Endocrinology. 2010;207(2):125–126. [PubMed] 46. Frassetto L, Morris RC, Jr., Sebastian A. Long-term persistence of the urine calcium-lowering effect of potassium bicarbonate in postmenopausal women. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2005;90(2):831–834. [PubMed] 47. Vormann J, Worlitschek M, Goedecke T, Silver B. Supplementation with alkaline minerals reduces symptoms in patients with chronic low back pain. Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology. 2001;15(2-3):179–183. [PubMed] 48. Zofková I, Kancheva RL. The relationship between magnesium and calciotropic hormones. Magnesium Research. 1995;8(1):77–84. [PubMed] 49. Schwalfenberg G. Improvement of chronic back pain or failed back surgery with vitamin D repletion: a case series. Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine. 2009;22(1):69–74. [PubMed] 50. Groos E, Walker L, Masters JR. Intravesical chemotherapy. Studies on the relationship between pH and cytotoxicity. Cancer. 1986;58(6):1199–1203. [PubMed] 51. Smith SR, Martin PA, Edwards RHT. Tumour pH and response to chemotherapy: an in vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy study in non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. British Journal of Radiology. 1991;64(766):923–928. [PubMed] 52. Raghunand N, Gillies RJ. pH and chemotherapy. Novartis Foundation Symposium. 2001;240:199–211. [PubMed] 53. Raghunand N, He X, Van Sluis R, et al. Enhancement of chemotherapy by manipulation of tumour pH. British Journal of Cancer. 1999;80(7):1005–1011. [PMC free article] [PubMed]” class=”scaledImageFitWidth img” height=”301″ src=”https://scontent-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xap1/t1.0-9/10456030_1433458860254363_314050895636267033_n.jpg” style=”border-bottom-width: 0px; border-color: initial; border-left-width: 0px; border-right-width: 0px; border-style: initial; border-top-width: 0px; height: auto; min-height: 100%; position: relative; width: 302px;” width=”302″ />

Meat Declared TOO Dangerous/ACIDIC for Human Consumption – Causes Cancer!

Processed Meats Declared too Dangerous/Acidic for Human Consumption

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The World Cancer Research Fund recently completed a detailed review of 7,000 clinical studies covering links between diet and cancer. Upon conclusion it is evident that processed meats are dangerous for human consumption and consumers should stop buying and eating processed meats.
What are processed meats?Processed meats include bacon, sausage, hot dogs, sandwich meat, packaged ham, pepperoni, salami and nearly all meat found in prepared frozen meals. Processed meats are usually manufactured with a carcinogenic (linked to promote and cause cancer) ingredient known as sodium nitrate. Sodium nitrate is primarily used as a colour fixer by meat companies to make the packaged meats look bright red and fresh. Monosodium glutamate is also added on a regular basis to enhance the savoury flavour.
Sodium Nitrate has been strongly linked to the formation of cancer-causing nitrasamines in the human body, leading to a sharp increase in the risk of cancer for those consuming them. A 2005 Hawaii University study found that eating processed meats increased the risk of pancreatic cancer by 67%, whilst another study found that it increased the risk of colorectal cancer by 50%. These are scary numbers for those consuming processed meats on a regular basis.
Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a second dangerous chemical found in virtually all processed meat products. MSG is a dangerous excitotoxin linked to neurological disorders such as migraine headaches, Alzheimer’s disease, loss of appetite control, obesity and many other serious health conditions. Manufacturers use MSG to add an addictive savory flavor to dead-tasting processed meat products.
Foods to NEVER eat:
  • Beef jerky
  • Bacon
  • Sausage
  • Pepperoni
  • Hot dogs
  • Sandwich meat
  • Deli slices
  • Ham/Pork
  • Frozen pizzas with meat
  • Canned soups containing meat
  • Frozen meals with meat
  • Ravioli and meat pasta foods
  • Turkey
  • Chicken
  • Beef
…and many more meat products
If its so dangerous to consume why are they allowed to sell it?
Unfortunately now days the food industry interests now dominate the actions of the government regulators. The USDA for example tried to ban sodium nitrate in the late 1970′s but were overridden by the meat industry insisting the chemical was ‘safe’. Today the food and agriculture corporations hold tremendous influence over the food industry and as a result  consumers have little protection from dangerous chemicals intentionally added to foods, medicines and personal care products.
To avoid the dangers of processed meats:
  • Always read ingredient labels
  • Don’t buy anything made with sodium nitrate or MSG
  • Avoid eating red meats served by restaurants, schools, hospitals, hotels or other institutions without asking for details
  • Eat more fresh green organic fruit and vegetables
  • Avoid processed meats always
  • Spread the word and tell others about the dangers of sodium nitrate and MSG and the acids in meat including nitric acid, sulphuric acid, phosphuric acid and uric acid, all poisons to the body.
Antioxidants naturally found in fresh organ fruits and vegetables have been shown to help prevent the formation of cancerous-causing nitrosamines, protecting you from the devastating health effects of animal proteins. The best defence of course is to avoid animal protein/flesh all together!

The Truth About Alkalizing Your Blood, Interstitial and Intracellular Fluids!

The following article is Dr. Robert O. Young’s rebuttal to Dr. Ben Kim’s felacous statements concerning the bio-electro/chemistry of the blood and tissues.
 

April 12, 2012

The Truth About Alkalizing Your Blood

Dr. Ben Kim states: Is it true that the foods and beverages you consume cause your blood to become more alkaline or acidic? Contrary to popular hype, the answer is: not to any significant degree.

Dr. Robert O. Young states: The pH of blood and interstitial fluids are constantly being challenged with environmental, dietary, respiratory, and metabolic acids. The body deals with blood acids by eliminating these acids through the four channels of elimination (urination, perspiration, defecation and respiration) and the buffering of acids through the alkaline buffering system in order to maintain the delicate pH balance of the blood plasma and interstitial fluids at 7.365.

Dr. Kim Ben states: The pH of your blood is tightly regulated by a complex system of buffers that are continuously at work to maintain a range of 7.35 to 7.45, which is slightly more alkaline than pure water.

Dr. Robert O. Young states: The pH of your extracellular fluids, which includes the blood plasma and the interstitial fluids are kept at a very narrow range at 7.365 to 7.385. Any pH measurement of blood plasma in excess of 7.385 indicates a condition of compensated acidosis and any pH measurement of blood plasma or interstitial fluids below 7.365 indicates a condition of decompensated acidosis.

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When the pH of the blood plasma increases above the 7.385 this is the result of the blood pushing environmental, dietary, respiratory and metabolic acids out into the interstitial fluids of the colloidal connective tissues of the schade as the blood is pulling alkaline mineral salts such as calcium ions from the bones or magnesium ions from the muscles to offset the increase of acids in the blood. It is always a sure sign that as the blood plasma is becoming more alkaline the interstitial fluids of  the colloidal connective tissues of the schade are becoming more acidic and this is the cause of ALL inflammatory and degenerative diseases.

When the body tissues, organs, cells, or the alkaline reserves (sodium, calcium, magnesium and potassium) become deficient in alkaline minerals the blood plasma pH will drop below the ideal 7.365 causing decompensated acidosis leading to hemolysis at a pH below 7.365 or a coma and/or death at a pH below 7.2.

Dr. Kim Ben states: If the pH of your blood falls below 7.35, the result is a condition called acidosis, a state that leads to central nervous system depression. Severe acidosis – where blood pH falls below 7.00 – can lead to a coma and even death.

Dr. Robert O. Young states: If pH of the blood plasma drops below 7.365 the result is called decompenated acidosis.  If the pH of the blood plasma stays at the ideal 7.365 this is called compensated acidosis. And if the pH of the blood plasma increases above the 7.365 this is called “latent tissue acidosis” in the interstitial fluids of the colloidal connective tissues of the schade.

The blood plasma pH always goes alkaline when the blood pushes out environmental, dietary, respiratory or metabolic acids out into the interstitial fluids of the colloidal connective tissues of the schade. These acids are always deposited into what I call the ‘acid catchers’ which are the connective tissues of the schade. This leads to what I call ‘latent tissue acidosis’.

As acids build-up in the colloidal connective tissues of the schade and if NOT eliminated by the lymphatic system and the out through the channels of elimination, including the skin, lungs, bowels or urine this will result in ALL the connective tissue diseases and degenerative diseases, including ALL cancerous conditions.

Dr. Kim Ben states: If the pH of your blood rises above 7.45, the result is alkalosis. Severe alkalosis can also lead to death, but through a different mechanism; alkalosis causes all of the nerves in your body to become hypersensitive and over-excitable, often resulting in muscle spasms, nervousness, and convulsions; it’s usually the convulsions that cause death in severe cases.

Dr. Robert O. Young states: If the blood plasma pH increases over 7.385 you are in a state of ‘latent tissue acidosis’ of the interstitial fluids on the colloidal connective tissue of the shade and a high risk for cancer. This is what I call the “tee-ter-totter effect”. The body is pulling alkaline minerals into the blood to compensate for an equal amount of acids being pushed out into the interstitial fluids of the connective tissues of the schade to keep the blood plasma in an alkaline state. The result is tissue acidosis which then leads to hypersensitivity and over-excitable nerves, muscle spasms, nervousness and convulsions that can lead to coma or even death.  All of these symptoms are NOT a result of too much base or alkalinity but the result of too much acid from the blood being deposited into the interstitial fluids of the colloidal connective tissues of the schade. The cause of ‘latent tissue acidosis’ is caused by an acidic lifestyle and dietary choices.

Dr. Kim Ben states: The bottom line is that if you’re breathing and going about your daily activities, your body is doing an adequate job of keeping your blood pH somewhere between 7.35 to 7.45, and the foods that you are eating are not causing any wild deviations of your blood pH.

Dr. Robert O. Young: The bottom line is when you understand that having an acidic lifestyle and diet does affect the blood plasma and interstitial fluid pH in a negative way.

The blood responds to increased acids from lifestyle and diet by pushing them out into the interstitial fluids of the connective tissues or the colloidal connective tissues of the schade. The foods you eat, the liquids you drink, the air you breath, even your thoughts will effect the pH of blood and then the interstitial fluids of the colloidal connective tissues. The blood is constantly responding to the acidic wastes of lifestyle and diet choices!!!!!!!!!!!

Dr. Kim Ben stated: So what’s up with all the hype about the need to alkalize your body? And what’s to be made of the claim that being too acidic can cause osteoporosis, kidney stones, and a number of other undesirable health challenges?

Dr. Robert O. Young states: The hype about alkalizing your blood and then interstitial fluids of the connective tissues is important because the human body is alkaline by design and acidic by function. This is the foundation for understanding the true cause of ALL sickness and disease.

Dr. Kim Ben states: As usual, the answers to such questions about human health can be found in understanding basic principles of human physiology. So let’s take a look at the fundamentals of pH and how your body regulates the acid-alkaline balance of its fluids on a moment-to-moment basis.

Dr. Robert O. Young states: The problems with current understanding of the basic principals of human physiology is the basic principals do NOT understand that the human body is alkaline by design and acidic by function. Current medical savants DO NOT understand that there is only one health, one sickness, one disease and one treatment. The one health is to maintain the alkaline design of the blood and interstitial fluids of the connective tissues with an alkaline lifestyle and diet. The one sickness and one disease is the over-acidification of the blood and then tissues due to an inverted way of living, eating and thinking. The one treatment is to restore the alkaline design of the body fluids with an alkaline lifestyle and diet. Remember the fish bowl metaphor? It goes like this – When the fish is sick what would you do? Treat the fish or change the water? Remember the fish is only as healthy as the water it swims in.

Dr. Kim Ben states: pH is a measure of how acidic or alkaline a liquid is. With respect to your health, the liquids involved are your body fluids, which can be categorized into two main groups:

  1. Intracellular fluid, is the fluid found in all of your cells. Intracellular fluid is often called cytosol, and makes up about two-thirds of the total amount of fluid in your body.

  2. Extracellular fluid, is the fluid found outside of your cells. Extracellular fluids are further classified as one of two types:

    • Plasma, which is fluid that makes up your blood.
    • Interstitial fluid, which occupies all of the spaces that surround your tissues. Interstitial fluid includes the fluids found in your eyes, lymphatic system, joints, nervous system, and between the protective membranes that surround your cardiovascular, respiratory, and abdominal cavities.

      Your blood (plasma) needs to maintain a pH of 7.35 to 7.45 for your cells to function properly. Why your cells require your blood to maintain a pH in this range to stay healthy is beyond the scope of this article, but the most important reason is that all of the proteins that work in your body have to maintain a specific geometric shape to function, and the three-dimensional shapes of the proteins in your body are affected by the tiniest changes in the pH of your body fluids.

Dr. Robert O. Young states: pH is a measurement of the concentrations of hydrogen and hydroxyl ions in a aqueous solution. Any aqueous solutions, including your blood plasma interstitial fluids of the colloidal connective tissues of the schade (the largest organ of the human body) and the intracellular fluids that are saturated in hydrogen ions is less or more acidic and any aqueous solution that is saturated in hydroxyl ions is less or more base or alkaline.

Once again, the human body is alkaline in its design and acidic in its function. Your blood plasma and interstitial fluids of the colloidal connective tissue of the schade needs to be maintained at a delicate pH of 7.365 for your cells to function properly.

I have found in my own blood research that when your pH is stable at 7.365 you find healthy blood which is even in color, even in size and even in shape. The red blood cell is the primary stem cell which becomes all other body cells. And the health of the blood and the interstitial fluid of the colloidal connective tissues of the shcade is directly connected to the health of all body cells. It is blood that becomes, liver, heart, brain and skin cells. All red blood cells and then body cells are made up of microzymas.

Microzymas are the foundational, indestructable matter and intelligent matter that makes up all living cells, including the DNA. The tiniest changes in the pH of the body fluids can cause the microzymas in the red blood cells or body cells to change into bacteria, yeast and/or mold. This is how germs are created – from within NOT from without.

Dr. Kim Ben states: The pH scale ranges from 0 to 14. A liquid that has a pH of 7 is considered to be neutral (pure water is generally considered to have a neutral pH). Fluids that have a pH below 7 – like lemon juice and coffee – are considered to be acidic. And fluids that have a pH above 7 – like human blood and milk of magnesia – are considered to be alkaline.

Dr. Robert O. Young states: The pH scale ranges from 0 to 14 with the pH of 7 being the midpoint (pure water may have a pH of 7 but I have found that the pH of pure water has a range of 6.2 to 7.2 – a 10 times exponential swing. I have also found that pure water has an oxidative reduction potential in a range of +50mV to +150mV) which will drain energy from the body. Lemon is an alkaline fruit not an acidic fruit. This is because of its low sugar and high alkaline mineral content of potassium bicarbonate. Lemons do not draw down on the alkaline buffering system and contributes in excess of 10 times in hydroxyl ions (OH-) in relationship to its hydrogen ion content.

Dr. Kim Ben states: It’s important to note that on the pH scale, each number represents a tenfold difference from adjacent numbers; in other words, a liquid that has a pH of 6 is ten times more acidic than a liquid that has a pH of 7, and a liquid with a pH of 5 is one hundred times more acidic than pure water.  Most carbonated soft drinks (pop) have a pH of about 3, making them about ten thousand times more acidic than pure water. Please remember this the next time you think about drinking a can of pop.

When you ingest foods and liquids, the end products of digestion and assimilation of nutrients often results in an acid or alkaline-forming effect – the end products are sometimes called acid ash or alkaline ash.

Dr. Robert O. Young states – All food and drink which has a pH of less than 8.4 will cause the production of sodium bicarbonate by the stomach and the release of this sodium bicarbonate via the salivary glands, the pylorus glands, the pancreas, gall bladder and intestinal glands to alkalize whatever ingested. The main purpose of stomach is to prepare the food in a liquid state at a pH of 8.4 for biological transformation into stem cells which takes place in the crypts of the small intestines.

Dr. Kim Ben states: Also, as your cells produce energy on a continual basis, a number of different acids are formed and released into your body fluids. These acids – generated by your everyday metabolic activities – are unavoidable; as long as your body has to generate energy to survive, it will produce a continuous supply of acids.

Dr. Robert O. Young states: Metabolism produces acidic waste products of lactic, uric, citric and glucose if not eliminated will cause dis-ease and then disease. You are only as healthy as the alkaline fluids of the body which includes the extracellular and intracellular fluids.

Dr. Kim Ben states: So there are two main forces at work on a daily basis that can disrupt the pH of your body fluids – these forces are the acid or alkaline-forming effects of foods and liquids that you ingest, and the acids that you generate through regular metabolic activities. Fortunately, your body has three major mechanisms at work at all times to prevent these forces from shifting the pH of your blood outside of the 7.35 to 7.45 range.

Dr. Robert O. Young states: There are seven main sources at work on a daily basis that can disrupt the pH of your body fluids – these forces include acids from the external environment, acids from the foods and liquids ingested, acids from the air you breath, acids from metabolism, acids from cells breaking down or catobolic acitivity, acids from endogenous bacteria, yeast and mold, and acids from respiration. Your body has an elaborate alkalizing buffering system at work at all times to help prevent through chelaton these forces from shifting the pH of the blood plasma pH as well as the interstitial fluid pH at a delicate pH of 7.365. It is important to note that when the alkaline buffering system (a new organ discovered by Dr. Robert O. Young) becomes depleted and acids are being deposited into the interstitial fluids of the colloidal connective tissues and the fatty tissues this is when dis-ease and eventual disease manifests.

Dr. Kim Ben states:

These mechanisms are:

  1. Buffer Systems

    • Carbonic Acid-Bicarbonate Buffer System
    • Protein Buffer System
    • Phosphate Buffer System
  2. Exhalation of Carbon Dioxide
  3. Elimination of Hydrogen Ions via Kidneys
 
Dr. Robert O. Young states: There are ten (10) mechanisms that the body engages to buffer excess acids from lifestyle and dietary choices that are NOT properly eliminated through the four channels of elimination (bowels, kidney, skin and lungs):
1) The sodium bicarbonate system – the main organ of production is the stomach. The stomach is the major organ for sodium bicarbonate production for alkalizing food and maintaining the alkaline pH of the blood, tissues and organs.
2) The hemoglobin buffering system – the hemoglobin is a secondary alkalizing buffer for the blood when there is insufficient elements for the production of the primary buffer, sodium bicarbonate. This is the main cause of ALL blood diseases and why most all the client/patients I see have to a lesser or greater degree anemic and unhealthy blood.
3) The pHosphate buffering system which buffers acids creating phosphoric acid which is then excreted via the urine.
4) The ammonia buffering system reacts with hydrogen ions or acids to form ammonium ions which are excreted into the urine.
5) The plasma protein buffering system helps to chelate acids. The most plentiful type of buffer in the body including glutathione, methionine, cysteine and taurine which are found in the cells, lymph fluid and plasma.  Most plasma protein activity occurs intracellularly to bind or neutralize acids during cellular metabolism and/or disorganization or transformation of the human cell.
6) The electrolyte buffering system which includes the alkalizing mineral salts of sodium, magnesium, potassium and calcium. The chelation of any acid will form a less toxic solid or a stone in the body. All stones and cysts and tumors are the result of excess acids in the extra and intracellular fluids. The electrolyte or mineral buffers work in the blood, lymph, extracellular (blood plasma and interstitial fluids) and intracellular fluids to bind acids which are then removed via the urine. These four elements are recycled by the kidneys into the blood and lymph by binding them to CO2. Over 90 percent of the CO2 produced in the body through cellular fermentation in the production of energy is used to carry out this recycling process.
7) The low density lipo-protein buffering system also referred to as cholesterol works primarily as a binder of acids in the blood, lymph, and extracellular fluids which are then excreted via the urine. If elimination is compromised the fat bound acids are removed away from the organs that sustain life into the body cavities, hips, thighs, buttocks and abdominal area. This is the cause of over-weight and obesity.
8) The endocrine buffering system releases hormones to buffer acids. These hormones include the antidiuretic hormone which regulates the rate at which water is lost or retained by the body and aldosterone which regulates the level of sodium ions and potassium ions in the blood. These two alkaline secretions help the kidneys maintain the alkaline design of the body and reduce excess acidity thus creating pH balance in the body.
9) The release of free radicals or reduced hydrogen (OH- and SO-) by the lymphocytes to buffer excess acids in the blood, interstitial and intracellular fluids.
10) The retention of alkaline water to buffer excess acids in the colloidal connective tissues of the schade. This is the cause of edema or water retention.
Dr. Kim Ben states: It’s not in the scope of this post to discuss the mechanisms listed above in detail. For this article, I only want to point out that these systems are in place to prevent dietary, metabolic, and other factors from pushing the pH of your blood outside of the 7.35 to 7.45 range.
Dr. Robert O. Young states: The blood can be stressed from dietary and metabolic acids which are eliminated through the four channels of elimination or buffered by the ten alkalizing buffering mechanisms to maintain the delicate blood plasma, interstitial and intracellular pH at a healthy 7.365.

Dr. Kim Ben states: When people encourage you to “alkalize your blood,” most of them mean that you should eat plenty of foods that have an alkaline-forming effect on your system. The reason for making this suggestion is that the vast majority of highly processed foods – like white flour products and white sugar – have an acid-forming effect on your system, and if you spend years eating a poor diet that is mainly acid-forming, you will overwork some of the buffering systems mentioned above to a point where you could create undesirable changes in your health.

Dr. Robert O. Young states; Everything you eat, everything you drink, everything you breath, everything you think and everything you do affects the blood and interstitial fluids in an acidic way to a lesser or greater degree. That is why we age. We do not get old we mold from years of acidic lifestyle and dietary choices. The key to a healthy life or a life of sickness and disease and then eventual death is in the blood! Especially the blood plasma.

Dr. Kim Ben states: For example, your phosphate buffer system uses different phosphate ions in your body to neutralize strong acids and bases. About 85% of the phosphate ions that are used in your phosphate buffer system comes from calcium phosphate salts, which are structural components of your bones and teeth. If your body fluids are regularly exposed to large quantities of acid-forming foods and liquids, your body will draw upon its calcium phosphate reserves to supply your phosphate buffer system to neutralize the acid-forming effects of your diet. Over time, this may lead to structural weakness in your bones and teeth.

Dr. Robert O. Young states: Dr Kim Ben has described the cause of bone loss correctly. It is important to remember that the activation of the pHosphate buffering system does not happen when you are on an alkalizing lifestyle and diet and hyper-perfusing the blood and interstitial fluids of the colloidal connective tissues with alkalinity.  The alkaline lifestyle and diet is outlined in my book, The pH Miracle Revised and Updated.

Drawing on your calcium phosphate reserves at a high rate can also increase the amount of calcium that is eliminated via your genito-urinary system, which is why a predominantly acid-forming diet can increase your risk of developing calcium-rich kidney stones.

Dr. Ken Ben states: This is just one example of how your buffering systems can be overtaxed to a point where you experience negative health consequences. Since your buffering systems have to work all the time anyway to neutralize the acids that are formed from everyday metabolic activities, it’s in your best interest to follow a diet that doesn’t create unnecessary work for your buffering systems.

Dr. Robert O. Young states: The protocol that will NOT unnecessarily activate the alkaline buffering systems of the body is outlined in the pH Miracle Revised and Updated by Dr. Robert O. Young.

Dr. Kim Ben states: Generally speaking, most vegetables and fruit have an alkaline-forming effect on your body fluids.

Dr. Robert O. Young states: Generally, all green fruit and vegetables are the ONLY alkalizing foods for the blood and interstitial fluids of the colloidal connective tissues and are critical in building healthy blood and then healthy body cells.

Dr. Kim Ben states: Most grains, animal foods, and highly processed foods have an acid-forming effect on your body fluids.

Dr. Robert O. Young states; All grains, animal foods, dairy products, fermented foods, algae, probiotics, enzymes, high sugar fruit, high sugar vegetables, vinegar, corn, nuts, mushrooms, alcohol, carbonate drinks, sport drinks and tobacco products are acidic to the blood and interstitial fluids of the colloidal connective tissues of the schade (the largest organ of the body) and will activate the alkaline buffering systems.

Dr. Kim Ben states: Your health is best served by a good mix of nutrient-dense, alkaline andacid-forming foods; ideally, you want to eat more alkaline-forming foods than acid-forming foods to have the net acid and alkaline-forming effects of your diet match the slightly alkaline pH of your blood.

Dr. Robert O. Young states: The only way to achieve extraordinary health and fitness is with the pH Miracle Lifestyle and Diet as outlined in The pH Miracle Revised and Updated book.

Dr. Kim Ben states: The following lists indicate which common foods have an alkaline-forming effect on your body fluids, and which ones result in acid ash formation when they are digested and assimilated into your system.

Please note that these lists of acid and alkaline-forming foods are not comprehensive, nor are they meant to be.

If you’re eating mainly grains, flour products, animal foods, and washing these foods down with coffee, soda, and milk, you will almost certainly improve your health by replacing some of your food and beverage choices with fresh vegetables and fruits.

Dr. Robert O. Young states: The four alkalizing food groups are chlorophyll from green fruit and green vegetables, mono and polyunsaturated oils, alkalizing water and finally alkalizing mineral salts. I call this the COWS Plan as outlined in The pH Miracle Revised and Updated book.

Dr. Kim Ben states: The primary purpose of this article is to offer information that explains why I believe that you don’t need to take one or more nutritional supplements or “alkalized water” for the sole purpose of alkalizing your body. Your body is already designed to keep the pH of your body fluids in a tight, slightly alkaline range.

Dr. Robert O. Young states: Your body is alkaline by design but acidic by function and that is why you would be wise to follow an alkaline lifestyle and diet to prevent ALL sickness and disease and remain strong, healthy and fit. Drinking alkaline water is essential to maintaining the healthy alkaline state of ALL your body fluids!!!!!!

Dr. Kim Ben states: The ideal scenario is to make fresh vegetables and fruits the centerpieces of your diet, and to eat small amounts of any other nutrient-dense foods that your appetite calls for and that experience shows your body can tolerate.

Dr. Robert O. Young states: The ideal scenario is to make fresh organic electron-rich green alkalizing fruit and vegetables the centerpiece of your diet with liberal amounts of alkalizing polyunsaturated oils, alkalizing water at a pH of 9.5 and finally alkalizing mineral salts of sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium.

Dr. Kim Ben states: I hope these thoughts bring some clarity to this often misunderstood health topic.

Dr. Robert O. Young states: I hope these scientific truths brings some clarity to Dr. Kim Ben and others that are confused about the biochemistry, bioenergetics and the importance of alkalizing the blood and interstitial fluids of the colloidal connective  tissues of the schade (the largest organ of the human body) with an alkaline lifestyle and diet as outlined in my book, The pH Miracle, revised and updated.

For additional information read The pH Miracle Revised and Updated by Dr. Robert O. Young .

 

Why Eating Meat and Cheese Is Making Your Body Dangerously Over-Acid Leading To Sickness and Disease Including Diabetes and/or Cancer!

 

Twenty-Five Scientific Points In Understanding Dr. Young’s “New Biology” and Why Eating Meat and Cheese Is Making Your Body Dangerously Over-Acid Leading To Sickness and Disease Including Diabetes and Cancer!

The following scientific discourse are twenty-five important points to understand concerning the creation of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) and hydrochloric acid (HCL) in the stomach lining, the ingestion of protein, cheese and sugar in any form and how acid/alkaline biochemistry, physiology, and anatomy relate to health, sickness, and disease.

Unfortunately, contemporary medical doctors and scientists as well as alternative health practitioners do not understand how acid/base are created in the body and the onset of latent tissue acidosis in the colloidal connective tissue or the “Schade”. Welcome to the 21st century and Dr. Young’s “New Biology.”

How is acid/base created in the body?

1) The parietal or cover cells of the stomach split the sodium chloride of the blood. The sodium is used to bind with water and carbon dioxide to form the alkaline salt, sodium bicarbonate or NaHCO3. The biochemistry is: H20 + CO2 + NaCl = NaHCO3 + HCL. This is why a call the stomach an alkalizing organ NOT an organ of digestion. The stomach DOES NOT digest the food or liquids you ingest it alkalizes the food and liquid you ingest.

2) For each molecule of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) made, a molecule of hydrochloric acid (HCL) is made and secreted into the so-called digestive system – specifically, the stomach (the gastric pits in the stomach) – to be eliminated. Therefore HCL is an acidic waste product of sodium bicarbonate created by the stomach to alkalize the food and liquids ingested.

3) The chloride ion from the sodium chloride (salt) binds to an acid or proton forming HCL as a waste product of sodium bicarbonate production. HCL has a pH of 1 and is highly toxic to the body and the cause of indigestion, acid reflux, ulcers and cancer.

4) When large amounts of acids, including HCL, enter the stomach from a rich animal protein or dairy product meal, such as meat and cheese, acid is withdrawn from the acid-base household. The organism would die if the resulting alkalosis – or NaHCO3 (base flood) or base surplus – created by the stomach was not taken up by the alkalophile glands that need these quick bases in order to build up their strong sodium bicarbonate secretions. These glands and organs are the stomach, pancreas, Brunner’s glands (between the pylorus and the junctions of the bile and pancreatic ducts), Lieberkuhn’s glands in the liver and its bile with its strong acid binding capabilities which it has to release on the highly acidic meat and cheese to buffer its strong acids of nitric, sulphuric, phosphoric, uric and lactic acids.

5) When a rich animal protein and dairy product meal is ingested, the stomach begins to manufacture and secrete sodium bicarbonate (NHCO3) to alkalize the acids from the food ingested. This causes a loss in the alkaline reserves and an increase in acid and/or HCL found in the gastric pits of the stomach. These acids and/or HCL are taken up by the blood which lowers blood plasma pH. The blood eliminates this increase in gastrointestinal acid by throwing it off into the Pishinger’s spaces.

6) The space enclosed by these finer and finer fibers is called the Pishinger’s space, or the extracellular space that contains the fluids that bath and feed each and every cell while carrying away the acidic waste from those same cells. There is no mention of this organ in American physiology text books. There is mention of the extracellular space but not of any organ that stores acids from metabolism and diet, like the kidney. I call this organ the “pre-kidney” because it stores metabolic and gastrointestinal acids until they can be buffered and eliminated via the skin, urinary tract, or bowels.

7) After a rich animal protein or dairy product meal, the urine pH becomes alkaline. The ingestion of meat and cheese causes a reaction in acidic fashion in the organism by the production of sulfuric, phosporhoric, nitric, uric, lactic, acetylaldehyde and ethanol acids, respectively, but also through the formation and excretion of base in the urine. Therefore eating meat and cheese causes a double loss of bases leading to tissue acidosis and eventual disease, especially inflammation and degenerative diseases.

8) During heavy exercise, if the the resulting lactic acid was not adsorbed by the collagen fibers, the specific acid catchers of the body, the organism would die. The total collection of these fibers is the largest organ of the body called SCHADE, the colloidal connective tissue organ. NO liquid exchange occurs between the blood and the parenchyma cells, or in reverse, unless it passes through this connective tissue organ. This organ connects and holds everything in our bodies in place. This organ is composed of ligaments, tendons, sinew, and the finer fibers that become the scaffolding that holds every single cell in our bodies in place. When acids are stored in this organ, which includes the muscles, inflammation and pain develop. The production of lactic acid is increased with the ingestion of milk, cheese, yogurt, butter and especially ice cream.

That is why I have stated, “acid is pain and pain is acid.” You cannot have one without the other. This is the beginning of latent tissue acidosis leading to irritation, inflammation and degeneration of the cells, tissues and organs.

 

9) The more acidity created from eating meat, cheese, milk or ice cream the more gastrointestinal acids are adsorbed into the the collagen fibers to be neutralized and the less sodium bicarbonate or NaHCO3 that is taken up by the alkalophile glands. The larger the potential difference between the adsorbed acids and the amount of NaHCO3 generated with each meal, the more or less alkaline are the alkalophile glands like the pancreas, gallbladder, pylorus glands, blood, etc. The acid binding power of the connective tissue, the blood, and the alkalophile glands depends on its alkali reserve, which can be determined through blood, urine, and saliva pH, including live and dried blood analysis as taught by Dr. Robert O. Young. The saliva pH is an indication of alkali reserves in the alkalophile glands and the urine pH is an indication of the pH of the fluids that surround the cells or the Pishinger’s space.

10) The iso-structure of the blood maintains the pH of the blood by pushing off gastrointestinal or metabolic acids into the connective tissue or the Pishinger’s space. The blood gives to the urine the same amount of acid that it receives from the tissues and liver so it can retain its iso-form. A base deficiency is always related to the deterioration of the deposit ability of the connective tissues or the Pishinger’s space. As long as the iso-structure of the blood is maintained, the urine – which originates from the blood – remains a faithful reflected image of the acid-base regulation, not of the blood, but of the tissues. The urine therefore is an excretion product of the tissues, not the blood. So when you are testing the pH of the urine, you are testing the pH of the tissues.

11) A latent “acidosis” is the condition that exists when there are not enough bases in the alkalophile glands because they have been used up in the process of neutralizing the acids adsorbed to the collagen fibers. This leads to compensated “acidosis.” This means the blood pH has not changed but other body systems have changed. This can then lead to decompensated “acidosis” where the alkaline reserves of the blood are used up and the pH of the blood is altered. Decompensated “acidosis” can be determined by testing the blood pH, urine pH and the saliva pH. The decrease in the alkaline reserves in the body occurs because of hyper-proteinization, (eating Meat and Cheese!)or too much protein, and hyper-carbonization, or too much sugar. This is why 80 to 90 year old folks are all shrunk up and look like prunes. They have very little or no alkaline reserves in their alkalophile glands. When all the alkaline minerals are gone, so are you and your battery runs down. The charge of your cellular battery can be measured by testing the ORP or the oxidative reduction potential of the blood, urine or saliva using an ORP meter. As you become more acidic this energy potential or ORP increases.

12) If there is not enough base left over after meat and cheese or surgary meal, or enough base to neutralize and clear the acids stored in the connective tissues, a relative base deficiency develops which leads to latent tissue acidosis. When this happens the liver and pancreas are deficient of adequate alkaline juices to ensure proper alkalization of the food in your stomach and small intestine.

13) Digestion or alkalization cannot proceed without enough of these alkaline juices for the liver and pancreas, etc., and so the stomach has to produce more acid in order to make enough base, ad nauseam, and one can develop indigestion, nausea, acid reflux, GERD, ulcers, esophageal cancer and stomach cancer. All of these symptoms are not the result of too much acid or HCL in the stomach. On the contrary, it is the result of too little base in the form of sodium bicarbonate!

14) Therefore the stomach is NOT an organ of digestion as currently taught in ALL biology and medical texts, BUT an organ of contribution or deposit. It’s function is to deposit alkaline juices to the stomach to alkalize the food and to the blood to carry to the alklophile glands!!!!

15) There is a daily rhythm to this acid base ebb and flow of the fluids of the body. The stored acids are mobilized from the connective tissues and Pishinger’s spaces while we sleep.
These acids reach their maximum (base tide) concentration in this fluid, and thereby the urine (around 2 a.m. is the most acidic). The acid content of the urine directly reflects the acid content of the fluid in the Pishinger’s spaces, the extracellular fluid compartments of the body. On the other hand, the Pishinger’s spaces become most alkaline around 2 p.m. (the base flood) as then the most sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) is being generated by the cover cells of the stomach to alkalize the food and drink we have ingested.

16) If your urine is not alkaline by 2 p.m. you are definitely in an ACIDIC condition and lacking in alkaline reserves. The pH of the urine should run between 6.8 and 8.4 but ideally 7.2 or greater.

17) After a high protein meal or meat or cheese, the free acids formed such as sulfuric, phosphoric, uric, and nitric acids stick to the collagen fibers to remove them from the blood and protect the delicate pH of the blood at 7.365. The H+ or proton ions from these acids are neutralized by the next base flood, the sodium bicarbonate produced after the meal. The H+ or proton ion combines with the carbonate or HCO3, converts to carbonic acid, H2CO3, which converts to CO2 and H2O. The sulfuric and other acids from proteins are neutralized as follows where the HR represents any acid with the R as its acid radical (SO4, PO4, or NO3) HR + NaHCO3 H2O + NaR (Ca, Mg, K)+ CO2.

18) Medical doctors and savants are not taught in medical school and therefore do not understand or recognize latent tissue acidosis. They understand and recognize compensated acidosis and decompensated acidosis. In compensated acidosis, breathing increases in order to blow off more carbonic acid which decreases PCO2 because of the lowered carbonate or HCO3. When the breathing rate can no longer get any faster and when the kidneys can no longer increase its’ function to keep up with the acid load, then the blood pH starts to change from a pH of 7.365 to 7.3 then to 7.2. At a blood pH of 6.95 the heart relaxes and the client goes into a coma or dies.

19) Metabolism of a normal adult diet results in the generation of 50 to 100 meq of H+ or proton per day, which must be excreted if the urine acid-base balance is to be maintained. A meq is a milliequivalent which is an expression of concentration of substance per liter of solution, calculated by dividing the concentration in milligrams per 100 milliliters by the molecular weight. This process involves two basis steps; 1) the reabsorption of the filtered sodium bicarbonate or NaHCO3 and, 2) excretion of the 50 to 100 meq of H+ or proton produced each day by the formation of titratable acidity and NH4+ or ammonium. Both steps involve H+ or proton secretion from the cells of the kidney into the urine.

20) Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) must be reabsorbed into the blood stream, since the loss of NaHCO3 will increase the net acid load and lower the plasma NaHCO3 concentration. The loss of NaHCO3 in the urine is equivalent to the addition of H+ to the body since both are derived from the dissociation of H2CO3 or carbonic acid.

21) The biochemistry is: CO2 + H2O = H2CO3 = HCO3 + H+. The normal subject must reabsorb 4300 meq of NaHCO3 each day! The secreted H+ or proton ions are generated within the kidney cells from the dissociation of H2O or water. This process also results in the equimolar production OH- or hydroxyl ions. The OH- ions bind to the active zinc-containing site of the intracellular carbonic anhydrase; they then combine with CO2 to form HCO3- ions which are released back into the kidney cells and returned to the systemic circulation. Second, the dietary acid load is excreted by the secretion of H+ or proton ions from the kidney cells into the urine. These H+ or proton ions can do one of two things: the H+ or proton ions can be combined with the urinary buffers, particularly HPO4, in a process called titratable acidity (The biochemistry is: H+ + HPO4 = H2PO4), or the phosphate buffering system or the H+ or proton ions can combine with ammonia (NH3) to form ammonium as follows: NH3 + H+ = NH4.

22) This ammonia is trapped and concentrated in the kidney as ammonium which is then excreted in the urine.

23) In response to acid load, 36% of the H+ or proton goes intracellular in exchange for the release of Na+ (sodium) into the blood stream. 15% of the acid goes intracellular in exchange for K+ (potassium) – common in diabetics. 6% of the H+ or proton or acid goes directly into the cell to be buffered by intracellular processes. 43% is buffered extracellularly as NaHCO3- or sodium bicarbonate combining with H+ or proton to form H2CO3 or carbonic acid which breaks down to CO2 or carbon dioxide to be released by the lungs. 10% of CO2 or carbon dioxide is excreted through the lungs and 90% is used by the body to reabsorb alkaline minerals and make sodium bicarbonate for buffering gastrointestinal and metabolic acids.

The biochemistry is: CO2 + H2O = H2CO3 = HCO3 + H+.24) Of all the ways the body can buffer metabolic and dietary acids, the excretion of protein (the eating of meat and cheese) generated acid residues is the only process that does not add sodium bicarbonate back into blood circulation. This creates a loss of bases which is the forerunner of all sickness and disease. In the long run, the only way to replace these lost bases is by eating more alkaline electron-rich green foods and long-chain polyunsaturated fats. Eating meat and cheese is definitely hazardous to your health. That is why I say, “a cucumber a day keeps the doctor away while eating meat, cheese and even an apple creates more excess acid in the colloidal connective tissues, leading to latent tissue acidosis.

25) With over 30 years of research and testing over 500,000 samples of blood and over 1,000,000 samples of urine and saliva I have come to the conclusion that the Human Body is an acid producing organism by function – yet, it is an alkaline organism by design. Eating animal protein, especially meat and cheese and sugar from any source are deadly acidic choices – unless you interested in becoming sick, tired and fat over time.

Bottom line – the pH Miracle Lifestyle and Diet is a program that focuses on the foundational principal that the body is alkaline by design and yet acidic by function. This make this program the ultimate program for preventing and reversing aging and the onset of sickness and dis-ease. I would say that the pH Miracle Lifestyle and Diet is the diet for a longer healthier life.

Please remember this very important truth, hydrochloric acid is not the cause of digestion but the result of digestion. Start alkalizing today and begin improving the quality and quantity of your life today.

To learn more about the pH Miracle Lifestyle and Diet go to:
http://www.phmiracleliving.com and http://www.articlesofhealth.blogspot.com