Category Archives: Nutrition

Cancer is a Preventable and Treatable Disease that Requires Major Lifestyle Changes!

“The cure for cancer is NOT found in its treatment but is found in its prevention”  –  Dr. Robert O. Young

Ninety-five-percent (95%) of ALL sickness and diseases are caused by what you eat, what you drink, what you breath and what you think.  Only five-percent (5%) of ALL sickness and diseases are caused by genetics.  The five-percent (5%) of All genetic factors are triggered by the epi-genetics or the alkaline environment of interstitial fluids determined by what you eat, what you drink, what you breath, and what you thing,  Therefore, one-hundred-percent (100%) is caused by what you eat, what you drink, what you breath and what you think.
(Sympathetic Resonance Technology, Scientific Foundations and Summary of Biologic and Clinical Studies, Dec. 2002, Vol. 8, No. 6: 835-842, Alkalizing Nutritional Therapy, medcraveonline.com/IJCAM/IJCAM-02-00046.php Robert O Young and Galina Migalko. Universal Medical Imaging Group, Medical doctor, non-invasive medical diagnostics, USA)

Abstract

This year, more than 1.5 million Americans and more than 18 million people worldwide are expected to be diagnosed with cancer, a disease commonly believed to be preventable. Only 5–10% of all cancer cases can be attributed to genetic defects, whereas the remaining 90–95% have their roots in the environment and lifestyle. The lifestyle factors include cigarette smoking, diet (fried foods, red meat), alcohol, sun exposure, environmental pollutants, infections, stress, obesity, and physical inactivity. The evidence indicates that of all cancer-related deaths, almost 25–30% are due to tobacco, as many as 30–35% are linked to diet, about 15–20% are due to infections, and the remaining percentage are due to other factors like radiation, stress, physical activity, environmental pollutants etc. Therefore, cancer prevention requires smoking cessation, increased ingestion of fruits and vegetables, moderate use of alcohol, caloric restriction, exercise, avoidance of direct exposure to sunlight, minimal meat consumption, use of whole grains, use of vaccinations, and regular check-ups. In this review, we present evidence that inflammation is the link between the agents/factors that cause cancer and the agents that prevent it. In addition, we provide evidence that cancer is a preventable disease that requires major lifestyle changes.

INTRODUCTION

After sequencing his own genome, pioneer genomic researcher Craig Venter remarked at a leadership for the twenty-first century conference, “Human biology is actually far more complicated than we imagine. Everybody talks about the genes that they received from their mother and father, for this trait or the other. But in reality, those genes have very little impact on life outcomes. Our biology is way too complicated for that and deals with hundreds of thousands of independent factors. Genes are absolutely not our fate. They can give us useful information about the increased risk of a disease, but in most cases they will not determine the actual cause of the disease, or the actual incidence of somebody getting it. Most biology will come from the complex interaction of all the proteins and cells working with environmental factors, not driven directly by the genetic code” (http://indiatoday.digitaltoday.in/index.php?

This statement is very important because looking to the human genome for solutions to most chronic illnesses, including the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of cancer, is overemphasized in today’s world. Observational studies, however, have indicated that as we migrate from one country to another, our chances of being diagnosed with most chronic illnesses are determined not by the country we come from but by the country we migrate to (1–4). In addition, studies with identical twins have suggested that genes are not the source of most chronic illnesses. For instance, the concordance between identical twins for breast cancer was found to be only 20% (5). Instead of our genes, our lifestyle and environment account for 90–95% of our most chronic illnesses.

Cancer continues to be a worldwide killer, despite the enormous amount of research and rapid developments seen during the past decade. According to recent statistics, cancer accounts for about 23% of the total deaths in the USA and is the second most common cause of death after heart disease (6). Death rates for heart disease, however, have been steeply decreasing in both older and younger populations in the USA from 1975 through 2002. In contrast, no appreciable differences in death rates for cancer have been observed in the United States (6).

By 2020, the world population is expected to have increased to 7.5 billion; of this number, approximately 15 million new cancer cases will be diagnosed, and 12 million cancer patients will die (7). These trends of cancer incidence and death rates again remind us of Dr. John Bailer’s May 1985 judgment of the US national cancer program as a “qualified failure,” a judgment made 14 years after President Nixon’s official declaration of the “War on Cancer.” Even after an additional quarter century of extensive research, researchers are still trying to determine whether cancer is preventable and are asking “If it is preventable, why are we losing the war on cancer?” In this review, we attempt to answer this question by analyzing the potential risk factors of cancer and explore our options for modulating these risk factors.

Cancer is caused by both internal factors (such as inherited mutations, hormones, and immune conditions) and environmental/acquired factors (such as tobacco, diet, radiation, and infectious organisms; Fig. 1). The link between diet and cancer is revealed by the large variation in rates of specific cancers in various countries and by the observed changes in the incidence of cancer in migrating. For example, Asians have been shown to have a 25 times lower incidence of prostate cancer and a ten times lower incidence of breast cancer than do residents of Western countries, and the rates for these cancers increase substantially after Asians migrate to the West (http://www.dietandcancerreportorg/?p=ER).

Fig 1

The role of genes and environment in the development of cancer. A The percentage contribution of genetic and environmental factors to cancer. The contribution of genetic factors and environmental factors towards cancer risk is 5–10% and 90–95% respectively. B Family risk ratios for selected cancers. The numbers represent familial risk ratios, defined as the risk to a given type of relative of an affected individual divided by the population prevalence. The data shown here is taken from a study conducted in Utah to determine the frequency of cancer in the first-degree relatives (parents + siblings + offspring). The familial risk ratios were assessed as the ratio of the observed number of cancer cases among the first degree relatives divided by the expected number derived from the control relatives, based on the years of birth (cohort) of the case relatives. In essence, this provides an age-adjusted risk ratio to first-degree relatives of cases compared with the general population.

C Percentage contribution of each environmental factor. The percentages represented here indicate the attributable-fraction of cancer deaths due to the specified environmental risk factor.

The importance of lifestyle factors in the development of cancer was also shown in studies of monozygotic twins (8). Only 5–10% of all cancers are due to an inherited gene defect. Various cancers that have been linked to genetic defects are shown in Fig. 2. Although all cancers are a result of multiple mutations (9, 10), these mutations are due to interaction with the environment (11, 12).

 Fig. 2

Genes associated with risk of different cancers

These observations indicate that most cancers are not of hereditary origin and that lifestyle factors, such as dietary habits, smoking, alcohol consumption, and infections, have a profound influence on their development (13). Although the hereditary factors cannot be modified, the lifestyle and environmental factors are potentially modifiable. The lesser hereditary influence of cancer and the modifiable nature of the environmental factors point to the preventability of cancer. The important lifestyle factors that affect the incidence and mortality of cancer include tobacco, alcohol, diet, obesity, infectious agents, environmental pollutants, and radiation.

RISK FACTORS OF CANCER

Tobacco

Smoking was identified in 1964 as the primary cause of lung cancer in the US Surgeon General’s Advisory Commission Report (http://profiles.nlm.nih.gov/NN/Views/AlphaChron/date/10006/05/01/2008), and ever since, efforts have been ongoing to reduce tobacco use. Tobacco use increases the risk of developing at least 14 types of cancer (Fig. 3). In addition, it accounts for about 25–30% of all deaths from cancer and 87% of deaths from lung cancer. Compared with nonsmokers, male smokers are 23 times and female smokers 17 times more likely to develop lung cancer.

(http://www.cancer.org/docroot/STT/content/STT_1x_Cancer_Facts_and_Figures_2008.asp accessed on 05/01/2008).

The carcinogenic effects of active smoking are well documented; the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, for example, in 1993 classified environmental tobacco smoke (from passive smoking) as a known (Group A) human lung carcinogen.

(http://cfpub2.epa.gov/ncea/cfm/recordisplay.cfm?deid=2835 accessed on 05/01/2008).

Tobacco contains at least 50 carcinogens. For example, one tobacco metabolite, benzopyrenediol epoxide, has a direct etiologic association with lung cancer (14). Among all developed countries considered in total, the prevalence of smoking has been slowly declining; however, in the developing countries where 85% of the world’s population resides, the prevalence of smoking is increasing. According to studies of recent trends in tobacco usage, developing countries will consume 71% of the world’s tobacco by 2010, with 80% increased usage projected for East Asia.

(http://www.fao.org/DOCREP/006/Y4956E/Y4956E00.HTM accessed on 01/11/08)

The use of accelerated tobacco-control programs, with an emphasis in areas where usage is increasing, will be the only way to reduce the rates of tobacco-related cancer mortality.

 Fig. 3

Cancers that have been linked to alcohol and smoking

Percentages represent the cancer mortality attributable to alcohol and smoking in men and women as reported by Irigaray et al. (see 13).

How smoking contributes to cancer is not fully understood. We do know that smoking can alter a large number of cell-signaling pathways. Results from studies in our group have established a link between cigarette smoke and inflammation. Specifically, we showed that tobacco smoke can induce activation of NF-κB, an inflammatory marker (15,16). Thus, anti-inflammatory agents that can suppress NF-κB activation may have potential applications against cigarette smoke.

We also showed that curcumin, derived from the dietary spice turmeric, can block the NF-κB induced by cigarette smoke (15). In addition to curcumin, we discovered that several natural phytochemicals also inhibit the NF-κB induced by various carcinogens (17). Thus, the carcinogenic effects of tobacco appear to be reduced by these dietary agents. A more detailed discussion of dietary agents that can block inflammation and thereby provide chemopreventive effects is presented in the following section.

Alcohol

The first report of the association between alcohol and an increased risk of esophageal cancer was published in 1910 (18). Since then, a number of studies have revealed that chronic alcohol consumption is a risk factor for cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract, including cancers of the oral cavity, pharynx, hypopharynx, larynx, and esophagus (18–21), as well as for cancers of the liver, pancreas, mouth, and breast (Fig. 3). Williams and Horn (22), for example, reported an increased risk of breast cancer due to alcohol. In addition, a collaborative group who studied hormonal factors in breast cancer published their findings from a reanalysis of more than 80% of individual epidemiological studies that had been conducted worldwide on the association between alcohol and breast cancer risk in women. Their analysis showed a 7.1% increase in relative risk of breast cancer for each additional 10 g/day intake of alcohol (23). In another study, Longnecker et al., (24) showed that 4% of all newly diagnosed cases of breast cancer in the USA are due to alcohol use. In addition to it being a risk factor for breast cancer, heavy intake of alcohol (more than 50–70 g/day) is a well-established risk factor for liver (25) and colorectal (26,27) cancers.

There is also evidence of a synergistic effect between heavy alcohol ingestion and hepatitis C virus (HCV) or hepatitis B virus (HBV), which presumably increases the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by more actively promoting cirrhosis. For example, Donato et al. (28) reported that among alcohol drinkers, HCC risk increased linearly with a daily intake of more than 60 g. However, with the concomitant presence of HCV infection, the risk of HCC was two times greater than that observed with alcohol use alone (i.e., a positive synergistic effect). The relationship between alcohol and inflammation has also been well established, especially in terms of alcohol-induced inflammation of the liver.

How alcohol contributes to carcinogenesis is not fully understood but ethanol may play a role. Study findings suggest that ethanol is not a carcinogen but is a cocarcinogen (29). Specifically, when ethanol is metabolized, acetaldehyde and free radicals are generated; free radicals are believed to be predominantly responsible for alcohol-associated carcinogenesis through their binding to DNA and proteins, which destroys folate and results in secondary hyperproliferation. Other mechanisms by which alcohol stimulates carcinogenesis include the induction of cytochrome P-4502E1, which is associated with enhanced production of free radicals and enhanced activation of various procarcinogens present in alcoholic beverages; a change in metabolism and in the distribution of carcinogens, in association with tobacco smoke and diet; alterations in cell-cycle behavior such as cell-cycle duration leading to hyperproliferation; nutritional deficiencies, for example, of methyl, vitamin E, folate, pyridoxal phosphate, zinc, and selenium; and alterations of the immune system. Tissue injury, such as that occurring with cirrhosis of the liver, is a major prerequisite to HCC. In addition, alcohol can activate the NF-κB proinflammatory pathway (30), which can also contribute to tumorigenesis (31). Furthermore, it has been shown that benzopyrene, a cigarette smoke carcinogen, can penetrate the esophagus when combined with ethanol (32). Thus anti-inflammatory agents may be effective for the treatment of alcohol-induced toxicity.

In the upper aerodigestive tract, 25–68% of cancers are attributable to alcohol, and up to 80% of these tumors can be prevented by abstaining from alcohol and smoking (33). Globally, the attributable fraction of cancer deaths due to alcohol drinking is reported to be 3.5% (34). The number of deaths from cancers known to be related to alcohol consumption in the USA could be as low as 6% (as in Utah) or as high as 28% (as in Puerto Rico). These numbers vary from country to country, and in France have approached 20% in males (18).

Diet

In 1981, Doll and Peto (21) estimated that approximately 30–35% of cancer deaths in the USA were linked to diet (Fig. 4). The extent to which diet contributes to cancer deaths varies a great deal, according to the type of cancer (35). For example, diet is linked to cancer deaths in as many as 70% of colorectal cancer cases. How diet contributes to cancer is not fully understood. Most carcinogens that are ingested, such as nitrates, nitrosamines, pesticides, and dioxins, come from food or food additives or from cooking.

 Fig. 4

Cancer deaths (%) linked to diet as reported by Willett (see 35)

Heavy consumption of red meat is a risk factor for several cancers, especially for those of the gastrointestinal tract, but also for colorectal (36–38), prostate (39), bladder (40), breast (41), gastric (42), pancreatic, and oral (43) cancers. Although a study by Dosil-Diaz et al., (44) showed that meat consumption reduced the risk of lung cancer, such consumption is commonly regarded as a risk for cancer for the following reasons. The heterocyclic amines produced during the cooking of meat are carcinogens. Charcoal cooking and/or smoke curing of meat produces harmful carbon compounds such as pyrolysates and amino acids, which have a strong cancerous effect. For instance, PhIP (2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenyl-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine) is the most abundant mutagen by mass in cooked beef and is responsible for ~20% of the total mutagenicity found in fried beef. Daily intake of PhIP among Americans is estimated to be 280–460 ng/day per person (45).

Nitrites and nitrates are used in meat because they bind to myoglobin, inhibiting botulinum exotoxin production; however, they are powerful carcinogens (46). Long-term exposure to food additives such as nitrite preservatives and azo dyes has been associated with the induction of carcinogenesis (47). Furthermore, bisphenol from plastic food containers can migrate into food and may increase the risk of breast (48) and prostate (49) cancers. Ingestion of arsenic may increase the risk of bladder, kidney, liver, and lung cancers (50). Saturated fatty acids, trans fatty acids, and refined sugars and flour present in most foods have also been associated with various cancers. Several food carcinogens have been shown to activate inflammatory pathways.

Obesity

According to an American Cancer Society study (51), obesity has been associated with increased mortality from cancers of the colon, breast (in postmenopausal women), endometrium, kidneys (renal cell), esophagus (adenocarcinoma), gastric cardia, pancreas, prostate, gallbladder, and liver (Fig. 5). Findings from this study suggest that of all deaths from cancer in the United States, 14% in men and 20% in women are attributable to excess weight or obesity. Increased modernization and a Westernized diet and lifestyle have been associated with an increased prevalence of overweight people in many developing countries (52).

 Fig. 5

Various cancers that have been linked to obesity. In the USA overweight and obesity could account for 14% of all deaths from cancer in men and 20% of those in women (see 51).

Studies have shown that the common denominators between obesity and cancer include neurochemicals; hormones such as insulinlike growth factor 1 (IGF-1), insulin, leptin; sex steroids; adiposity; insulin resistance; and inflammation (53).

Involvement of signaling pathways such as the IGF/insulin/Akt signaling pathway, the leptin/JAK/STAT pathway, and other inflammatory cascades have also been linked with both obesity and cancer (53). For instance, hyperglycemia, has been shown to activate NF-κB (54), which could link obesity with cancer. Also known to activate NF-κB are several cytokines produced by adipocytes, such as leptin, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and interleukin-1 (IL-1) (55). Energy balance and carcinogenesis has been closely linked (53). However, whether inhibitors of these signaling cascades can reduce obesity-related cancer risk remains unanswered. Because of the involvement of multiple signaling pathways, a potential multi-targeting agent will likely be needed to reduce obesity-related cancer risk.

Infectious Agents

Worldwide, an estimated 17.8% of neoplasms are associated with infections; this percentage ranges from less than 10% in high-income countries to 25% in African countries (56, 57). Viruses account for most infection-caused cancers (Fig. 6). Human papillomavirus, Epstein Barr virus, Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpes virus, human T-lymphotropic virus 1, HIV, HBV, and HCV are associated with risks for cervical cancer, anogenital cancer, skin cancer, nasopharyngeal cancer, Burkitt’s lymphoma, Hodgkin’s lymphoma, Kaposi’s sarcoma, adult T-cell leukemia, B-cell lymphoma, and liver cancer.

Fig. 6

Various cancers that have been linked to infection. The estimated total of infection attributable cancer in the year 2002 is 17.8% of the global cancer burden. The infectious agents associated with each type of cancer is shown in the bracket. HPV Human papilloma virus, HTLV human T-cell leukemia virus, HIV human immunodeficiency virus, EBV Epstein–Barr virus (see 57).

In Western developed countries, human papillomavirus and HBV are the most frequently encountered oncogenic DNA viruses. Human papillomavirus is directly mutagenic by inducing the viral genes E6 and E7 (58), whereas HBV is believed to be indirectly mutagenic by generating reactive oxygen species through chronic inflammation (59–61). Human T-lymphotropic virus is directly mutagenic, whereas HCV (like HBV) is believed to produce oxidative stress in infected cells and thus to act indirectly through chronic inflammation (62, 63). However, other microorganisms, including selected parasites such as Opisthorchis viverrini or Schistosoma haematobium and bacteria such as Helicobacter pylori, may also be involved, acting as cofactors and/or carcinogens (64).

The mechanisms by which infectious agents promote cancer are becoming increasingly evident. Infection-related inflammation is the major risk factor for cancer, and almost all viruses linked to cancer have been shown to activate the inflammatory marker, NF-κB (65). Similarly, components of Helicobacter pylorihave been shown to activate NF-κB (66). Thus, agents that can block chronic inflammation should be effective in treating these conditions.

Environmental Pollution

Environmental pollution has been linked to various cancers (Fig. 7). It includes outdoor air pollution by carbon particles associated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs); indoor air pollution by environmental tobacco smoke, formaldehyde, and volatile organic compounds such as benzene and 1,3-butadiene (which may particularly affect children); food pollution by food additives and by carcinogenic contaminants such as nitrates, pesticides, dioxins, and other organochlorines; carcinogenic metals and metalloids; pharmaceutical medicines; and cosmetics (64).

Fig. 7

Various cancers that have been linked to environmental carcinogens. The carcinogens linked to each cancer is shown inside bracket. (see 64).

Numerous outdoor air pollutants such as PAHs increase the risk of cancers, especially lung cancer. PAHs can adhere to fine carbon particles in the atmosphere and thus penetrate our bodies primarily through breathing. Long-term exposure to PAH-containing air in polluted cities was found to increase the risk of lung cancer deaths. Aside from PAHs and other fine carbon particles, another environmental pollutant, nitric oxide, was found to increase the risk of lung cancer in a European population of nonsmokers. Other studies have shown that nitric oxide can induce lung cancer and promote metastasis. The increased risk of childhood leukemia associated with exposure to motor vehicle exhaust was also reported (64).

Indoor air pollutants such as volatile organic compounds and pesticides increase the risk of childhood leukemia and lymphoma, and children as well as adults exposed to pesticides have increased risk of brain tumors, Wilm’s tumors, Ewing’s sarcoma, and germ cell tumors. In utero exposure to environmental organic pollutants was found to increase the risk for testicular cancer. In addition, dioxan, an environmental pollutant from incinerators, was found to increase the risk of sarcoma and lymphoma.

Long-term exposure to chlorinated drinking water has been associated with increased risk of cancer. Nitrates, in drinking water, can transform to mutagenic N-nitroso compounds, which increase the risk of lymphoma, leukemia, colorectal cancer, and bladder cancer (64).

Radiation

Up to 10% of total cancer cases may be induced by radiation (64), both ionizing and non-ionizing, typically from radioactive substances and ultraviolet (UV), pulsed electromagnetic fields. Cancers induced by radiation include some types of leukemia, lymphoma, thyroid cancers, skin cancers, sarcomas, lung and breast carcinomas. One of the best examples of increased risk of cancer after exposure to radiation is the increased incidence of total malignancies observed in Sweden after exposure to radioactive fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. Radon and radon decay products in the home and/or at workplaces (such as mines) are the most common sources of exposure to ionizing radiation. The presence of radioactive nuclei from radon, radium, and uranium was found to increase the risk of gastric cancer in rats. Another source of radiation exposure is x-rays used in medical settings for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. In fact, the risk of breast cancer from x-rays is highest among girls exposed to chest irradiation at puberty, a time of intense breast development. Other factors associated with radiation-induced cancers in humans are patient age and physiological state, synergistic interactions between radiation and carcinogens, and genetic susceptibility toward radiation.

Non-ionizing radiation derived primarily from sunlight includes UV rays, which are carcinogenic to humans. Exposure to UV radiation is a major risk for various types of skin cancers including basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma. Along with UV exposure from sunlight, UV exposure from sun beds for cosmetic tanning may account for the growing incidence of melanoma. Depletion of the ozone layer in the stratosphere can augment the dose-intensity of UVB and UVC, which can further increase the incidence of skin cancer.

Low-frequency electromagnetic fields can cause clastogenic DNA damage. The sources of electromagnetic field exposure are high-voltage power lines, transformers, electric train engines, and more generally, all types of electrical equipments. An increased risk of cancers such as childhood leukemia, brain tumors and breast cancer has been attributed to electromagnetic field exposure. For instance, children living within 200 m of high-voltage power lines have a relative risk of leukemia of 69%, whereas those living between 200 and 600 m from these power lines have a relative risk of 23%. In addition, a recent meta-analysis of all available epidemiologic data showed that daily prolonged use of mobile phones for 10 years or more showed a consistent pattern of an increased risk of brain tumors (64).

Fruits, vegetables, spices, condiments and cereals with potential to prevent cancer. Fruits include 1 apple, 2apricot, 3 banana, 4 blackberry, 5 cherry, 6 citrus fruits, 7 dessert date, 8 durian, 9 grapes, 10 guava, 11 Indian gooseberry, 12 mango, 13 malay apple, 14 mangosteen, 15 pineapple, 16 pomegranate. Vegetables include 1artichok, 2 avocado, 3 brussels sprout, 4 broccoli, 5 cabbage, 6 cauliflower, 7 carrot, 8 daikon 9 kohlrabi, 10onion, 11 tomato, 12 turnip, 13 ulluco, 14 water cress, 15 okra, 16 potato, 17 fiddle head, 18 radicchio, 19komatsuna, 20 salt bush, 21 winter squash, 22 zucchini, 23 lettuce, 24 spinach. Spices and condiments include 1 turmeric, 2 cardamom, 3 coriander, 4 black pepper, 5 clove, 6 fennel, 7 rosemary, 8 sesame seed, 9 mustard, 10 licorice, 11 garlic, 12 ginger, 13 parsley, 14 cinnamon, 15 curry leaves, 16 kalonji, 17 fenugreek, 18camphor, 19 pecan, 20 star anise, 21 flax seed, 22 black mustard, 23 pistachio, 24 walnut, 25 peanut, 26 cashew nut. Cereals include 1 rice, 2 wheat, 3 oats, 4 rye, 5 barley, 6 maize, 7 jowar, 8 pearl millet, 9 proso millet, 10 foxtail millet, 11 little millet, 12 barnyard millet, 13 kidney bean, 14 soybean, 15 mung bean, 16 black bean, 17 pigeon pea, 18 green pea, 19 scarlet runner bean, 20 black beluga, 21 brown spanish pardina, 22green, 23 green (eston), 24 ivory white, 25 multicolored blend, 26 petite crimson, 27 petite golden, 28 red chief.

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To learn more about a healthy lifestyle and diet for the prevention of all sickness and disease read The pH Miracle revised and updated and The pH Miracle for Cancer – http://www.phoreveryoung.com

Lecture in Dubai – The Annual Conference on Bacterial, Viral and Infectious Diseases

Join Robert O Young PhD and Galina Migalko MD in Dubai on December 5th and 6th, 2018 for the Annual Conference on Bacterial, Viral and Infectious Diseases. They will be Key Note Speakers and doing a workshop on the New Biology.

For more information and to register go to: https://bacterialdiseases.infectiousconferences.com/organizing-committee.php

The following is the abstract for Dr. Young’s lecture:

The Dismantling of the Viral Theory

Robert O Young CPT, MSc, DSc, PhD, Naturopathic Practitioner

Abstract

There is now over 100 years of documented history and research on the Polio virus and whether or not its treatment by inoculation has been successful in eradicating Polio. I am suggesting in this article and in my lecture that there are significant findings based on historical and past and current research, including my own that the viral theory of Polio and possibly other modern-day diseases, such as Post-Polio Syndrome, Polio Vaccine-Induced Paralysis, Legionnaires, CNS disease, Cancer, HIV/AIDS and now Zika may be caused by acidic chemical poisoning from DDT (dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane) and other related DDT pesticides, acidic vaccinations, and other factors including lifestyle and dietary factors rather than from a lone infectious virus. I will present ten historical graphs outlining the history of Polio, the production of DDT, BHC, Lead, Arsenic, Polio vaccinations and the author’s theory that chemical poisoning, vaccination, and lifestyle and dietary choices are a more likely causes for the symptoms of Polio, neurological diseases, Cancer, HIV/AIDS and now Zika.

THE POSSIBLE CAUSE OF POLIO, POST-POLIO, CNS, PVIPD, LEGIONNAIRES, AIDS and the CANCER EPIDEMIC – MASS ACIDIC CHEMICAL POISONING?

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113. A. Tannenbaum, and H. Silverstone. The initiation and growth of tumors. Introduction. I. Effects of underfeeding. Am. J. Cancer. 38:335–350 (1940).

114. S. D. Hursting, J. A. Lavigne, D. Berrigan, S. N. Perkins, and J. C. Barrett. Calorie restriction, aging, and cancer prevention: mechanisms of action and applicability to humans. Annu. Rev. Med.54:131–152 (2003) doi:10.1146/annurev.med.54.101601.152156. [PubMed]

115. M. H. Ross, and G. Bras. Lasting influence of early caloric restriction on prevalence of neoplasms in the rat. J. Natl. Cancer Inst.47:1095–1113 (1971). [PubMed]

116. D. Albanes. Total calories, body weight, and tumor incidence in mice. Cancer Res.47:1987–92 (1987).[PubMed]

117. L. Gross, and Y. Dreyfuss. Reduction in the incidence of radiation-induced tumors in rats after restriction of food intake. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U S A. 81:7596–7598 (1984) doi:10.1073/pnas.81.23.7596. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

118. L. Gross, and Y. Dreyfuss. Prevention of spontaneous and radiation-induced tumors in rats by reduction of food intake. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U S A. 87:6795–6797 (1990) doi:10.1073/pnas.87.17.6795.[PMC free article] [PubMed]

119. K. Yoshida, T. Inoue, K. Nojima, Y. Hirabayashi, and T. Sado. Calorie restriction reduces the incidence of myeloid leukemia induced by a single whole-body radiation in C3H/He mice. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U S A. 94:2615–2619 (1997) doi:10.1073/pnas.94.6.2615. [PMC free article] [PubMed]

120. V. D. Longo, and C. E. Finch. Evolutionary medicine: From dwarf model systems to healthy centenarians? Science. 299:1342–1346 (2003) doi:10.1126/science.1077991. [PubMed]

The Real Truth About How NOT to DIE and DIE-IT!

20 Ways on How to Live Longer and Healthier – Free from ALL Sickness and Disease and Old Age

Have you heard about the ravages of acid rain in Australia and the loss of the coral reef or in Alaska and the loss of millions of pine trees or maybe you have heard about the oceans and the pH dropping because of acid rain. The cause is the result of toxic acidic carbon emissions in the global environment. Acid rain damages the leaves and needles on trees, reduces a tree’s ability to withstand cold, drought, disease and pests, and even inhibits or prevents plant reproduction. The oceans of the World are dying because of acidic carbon emissions from cars and cows. In an effort for the Earth and the oceans to stay alive and combat increased acidic pollution, as tree roots pull important nutrients such as calcium and magnesium from the soil and calcium and the oceans are pulling calcium and magnesium from the coral reefs and sodium from the ocean water increasing acidity. The extraction of alkaline minerals from the soil and water is necessary for all living things on the earth and oceans to stay alive and avoid sudden death. These alkaline nutrients help to balance the increased effects of acid rain, but as they become depleted from the soil or from the ocean, the trees’ and marine life’s ability to survive is strained and placed in certain danger of extinction. Just look at the pictures below and see what is happening to the forests of Denali, Alaska and the great barrier reef in Queensland, Australia. The forests in Alaska and the great barrier reef in Queensland, Australia are both headed towards irreversible extinction because of acid rain.

We Are All Subject to Acid Rain!

What if I told you that most ALL people living today are unknowingly doing similar things to their body? A highly acidic lifestyle and diet is like acid rain in our blood, interstitial fluids and intracellular fluids that constitutes over 65% of the whole body. While the body has an alkaline buffering system (headed up by the stomach) in place to ensure that the blood and the interstitial fluids stay slightly alkaline at 7.365 pH, the depletion of alkaline minerals from the bones, muscles and other parts of your body may leave YOU vulnerable to health issues leading to ALL sickness and disease.

What is pH – The Power of Hydrogen or Perfectly Healthy or Both?

The pH (potential of hydrogen) is the measurement of acid (a measurement of hydrogen ions or protons) or alkalinity (a measurement of reduced hydrogen or electrons) on a scale from 0 to 14 with a midpoint of 7. The lower the number the higher the acidity (or the greater the concentration of hydrogen ions or protons) based upon a logarithm to the power of negative 10! For example, the pH of a healthy ocean environment free from acid rain would be 8.350. If the ocean pH drops 1 point due to acid rain to a pH of 7.350, which is a 10 times drop in pH, all life as we know it in the oceans would die. In fact, if the ocean pH drops from 8.350 to 8.100, which is a .235 drop, ALL life in the oceans would die! That is all it takes for ALL marine life to cease in our Oceans! JUST a small drop of 2/10’s of 1 point for ALL life to end! Here is another very important example that I truly want you to understand. The healthy pH of the human blood and interstitial fluids which makes up 80 percent of ALL body fluids is 7.365. This pH of the blood and interstitial fluids is a dynamic and is always changing. How do I know this? Because Dr. Galina Migalko, MD, NMD and I are the only scientist in the World measuring and comparing the pH and chemistries of the blood against the pH and chemistries of the interstitium. This is critical to truly understand when you are moving toward metabolic alkalosis or metabolic acidosis and preventing and/or reversing any sickness and disease as well as determining the efficacy of any non-invasive or invasive treatments. In other words, are the treatments for any sickness and disease making you sicker or better, whether conventional or traditional? This can now be measured and determined with certainty.

Why is YOUR Stomach So Important to the pH of the Blood and Interstitum

So why does the body, primarily the stomach work so hard to maintain the delicate pH of the blood and interstitial fluids of the interstitium? Here is the most important answer YOU will read in YOUR life! If the blood and interstitial fluids drop below 7.100 from the ideal healthy pH of 7.365 you would go into a coma. When the blood and interstitial fluid pH drops to 6.900 you are DEAD! From what? Not global warming but from body warming or in other words acidosis! The key to avoid death is to maintain the alkaline design of the blood and interstitial fluids at a precise pH of 7.365 which can be measured without drawing one drop of blood or interstitial fluid. The technology is here and the science is real!

What is the Common Denominator of pH in Relationship to the Cause of ALL Sickness and Disease

This is the common denominator for ALL sickness and disease – ALL sickness and disease are caused by acidosis or acid rain or body warming! Therefore, there are NO specific diseases, there are ONLY specific disease or sickness conditions. All sickness and disease is caused by acid rain from within and is exactly what is happening in the oceans, the soils of our planet and in all humanity. Planetary and human sickness and disease is on the rise because of personal acidic lifestyles and dietary choices and because of ignorance. Name any disease and that disease or sickness is caused by metabolic, respiratory, gastrointestinal or environmental acidosis.

Check out this YouTube video on the 7 signs YOU and TOO Acidic

I hope you can see NOW how important it is to understand and then monitor your pH daily by having your your blood and interstitial fluids tested. Unfortunately, this new science and technology for testing the pH of the blood and interstitial fluids is limited Worldwide. (For more information concerning the testing of the blood and interstitial fluids or to make an appointment email: phmiraclelife@gmail.com) In the meantime, there is a simple, inexpensive and noninvasive way for testing the fluids of the interstitium, but not of the blood, for those of you who desire to monitor your interstitial fluid pH daily. You can test the pH of the morning urine, since this urine is a product of the interstitium and NOT of the blood, by using special pHydrion strips (www.phoreveryoung.com). When you measure the pH of your urine using these special pHydrion strips it is important to achieve each morning a pH of at least 7.300 by following the suggested lifestyle and diet as described below. When you are testing your morning urine, which is the most acidic time of the day, you are testing the pH of the interstitial fluids which makes up over 60 percent of the body fluids (25 liters). You can also test your saliva using the same special pHydrion strips. When you are testing your saliva pH you are testing your body reserves available for buffering acid rain. Both the urine and saliva pH should be at least 7.300 and must be tested daily as you follow the pH Miracle alkaline lifestyle and diet in order to achieve an ideal pH for “Perfect Health!”

What Does the Stomach Have to Do With pH

An acidic pH of the blood and then interstitial fluids is what causes acid reflux—a condition in which the stomach creates when it is trying to buffer dietary acids from your toxic acidic food or drink ingested or metabolic acids from all functions of the body or respiratory acids from your respiratory system to maintain the pH of the blood and interstitial fluids at a delicate pH of 7.365. The following is the stomach chemistry as it creates sodium bicarbonate to buffer excess acid rain on your blood, interstitial fluids and intercellular fluids: H20 (water) + NaCl (salt) + C02 (carbon dioxide) = NaHC03 (sodium bicarbonate) + HCL (hydrochloric acid).

This may be the first time you have ever heard this, but I have been saying this for many years, “the stomach DOES NOT DIGEST FOOD it ALKALIZES FOOD and protects ALL of our body fluids, organs and tissues from dietary, metabolic, respiratory and environmental acidosis! In other words, the stomach is an organ of contribution and NOT an organ of digestion. Eat any food without chewing it, like a piece of corn and see what happens. The corn comes out of your anus the same way it went into your mouth. The stomach digests nothing. The hydrochloric acid in your stomach is a waste product of sodium bicarbonate production for buffering acid rain or acidic waste from what you eat, what you drink, what you breath and what you think. This is why when an athlete goes into lactic acidosis they throw-up to rid their body of all the hydrochloric acid build-up in the gastric pits of the stomach. You see the body is working hard to buffer the increased lactic acid from increased metabolism so the athlete doesn’t die from acidic rain from a declining pH in the blood and interstitium. Even when a pregnant woman throws-up (generally in her first trimester) her stomach is producing sodium bicarbonate to buffer the acidic loads in her and her unborn child’s blood and interstitium. The increased need for alkalinity during pregnancy is significant and is NOT understood or even considered by medical savants. They think, unknowingly that the body just takes care of the pH of the blood and tissues and that what you eat, what you drink, what you breath, and what you think cannot effect this delicate pH balance. You see, morning sickness is nothing more than increased acids from diet, respiration and metabolism! It requires twice the energy to make a baby and with that the pregnant Mother has increased acid rain. So I want you to understand that the stomach’s main purpose is to maintain the alkaline design of the body to keep it alive. That is IT! Get IT?

To learn more about the physiology of the stomach read the following book. You can order this book online at the following link:

How is acid/base created in the body?

a) The parietal or cover cells of the stomach split the sodium chloride of the blood. The sodium is used to bind with water and carbon dioxide to form the alkaline salt, sodium bicarbonate or NaHCO3. The biochemistry is: H20 + CO2 + NaCl = NaHCO3 + HCL. This is why I call the stomach an alkalizing organ NOT an organ of digestion. The stomach DOES NOT digest the food or liquids you ingest it alkalizes the food and liquid you ingest.

b) For each molecule of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) made, a molecule of hydrochloric acid (HCL) is made and secreted into the so-called digestive system – specifically, the stomach (the gastric pits in the stomach) – to be eliminated. Therefore HCL is an acidic waste product of sodium bicarbonate production created by the stomach to alkalize the food and liquids ingested and to maintain the delicate pH of the blood and interstitial fluids at a pH of 7.365.

c) The chloride ion from the sodium chloride (salt) binds to an acid or proton forming HCL as a waste product of sodium bicarbonate production. HCL has a pH of 1 and is highly toxic to the body and the cause of indigestion, acid reflux, ulcers and cancer. In fact HCL is in all pharmaceuticals and most dietary nutritional supplements.

d) When large amounts of acids, including HCL, enter the stomach from a rich animal protein or dairy product meal, such as meat and cheese, acid is withdrawn from the acid-base household. The organism would die if the resulting alkalosis – or NaHCO3 (base flood) or base surplus – created by the stomach was not taken up by the alkalophile glands (pancreas, gallbladder, Lieberkuhn glands in the liver and the Brunner glands between the pylorus and the junctions of the bile and pancreatic ducts), that need these quick bases in order to build up their strong sodium bicarbonate secretions. These glands and organs, once again are the stomach, pancreas, Brunner’s glands (between the pylorus and the junctions of the bile and pancreatic ducts, Lieberkuhn’s glands in the liver and its bile with its strong acid binding capabilities which it has to release on the highly acidic meat and cheese to buffer its strong acids of nitric, sulphuric, phosphoric, uric and lactic acids.

e) When a rich animal protein and dairy product meal is ingested, the stomach begins to manufacture and secrete sodium bicarbonate (NHCO3) to alkalize the acids from the food ingested. This causes a loss in the alkaline reserves and an increase in acid and/or HCL found in the gastric pits of the stomach. These acids and/or HCL are taken up by the blood which lowers blood plasma pH. The blood eliminates this increase in gastrointestinal acid by throwing it off into the Pishinger’s spaces or what recent scientist are calling the Interstitium pictured below.

 

f) The space enclosed by these finer and finer fibers is called the Pishinger’s space, or the spaces of the interstitium that contains the fluids that bath and feed each and every cell while carrying away the acidic waste from those same cells. There is no mention of this organ in American physiology or medical school text books. There is mention of the space but not of any organ that stores acids from metabolism, respiration, environment and diet, like the kidney. I call this organ the “pre-kidney” because it stores metabolic respiratory, environmental and gastrointestinal acids until they can be buffered and eliminated via the skin, urinary tract, or bowels.

g) After a rich animal protein or dairy product meal, the urine pH becomes alkaline.The ingestion of meat and cheese causes a reaction in acidic fashion in the organism by the production of sulfuric, phosphoric, nitric, uric, lactic, acetylaldehyde and ethanol acids, respectively, but also through the formation and excretion of base in the urine. Therefore eating meat and cheese causes a double loss of bases leading to tissue acidosis and eventual disease, especially inflammation and degenerative diseases.

h) During heavy exercise, if the the resulting lactic acid was not adsorbed by the collagen fibers, the specific acid catchers of the body, the organism would die. The total collection of these fibers is the largest organ of the body called SCHADE, the colloidal connective tissue organ or the interstitium. NO liquid exchange occurs between the blood and the parenchyma cells, or in reverse, unless it passes through this connective tissue organ or the interstitium. This organ connects and holds everything in our bodies in place. This organ is composed of ligaments, tendons, sinew, and the finer fibers that become the scaffolding that holds every single cell in our bodies in place. When acids are stored in this organ (just discovered by American science in 2018. Dr. Robert O. Young with Dr. Galina Migalko published their pH findings of the blood, interstitial fluids of the Interstitium and the intracellular fluids in 2015. Their publication is pictured below), which includes the muscles, inflammation and pain develop. The production of lactic acid is increased with the ingestion of milk, cheese, yogurt, butter and especially ice cream.

 

That is why I have stated for years, “acid is pain and pain is acid.” You cannot have one without the other. This is the beginning of latent tissue acidosis leading to irritation, inflammation and degeneration of the cells, tissues and organs.

i) The more acidity created from eating meat, cheese, milk or ice cream the more gastrointestinal acids are adsorbed into the the collagen fibers to be neutralized and the less sodium bicarbonate or NaHCO3 that is taken up by the alkalophile glands. The larger the potential difference between the adsorbed acids and the amount of NaHCO3 generated with each meal, the more or less alkaline are the alkalophile glands like the pancreas, gallbladder, pylorus glands, blood, etc. The acid binding power of the connective tissue, the blood, and the alkalophile glands depends on its alkali reserve, which can be determined through blood, urine, and saliva pH testing, including live and dried blood analysis. (Currently we are the only two scientist in the World that are doing non-invasive testing of the stomach, blood, interstitium and intracellular fluid pH with results in less than 15 minutes) The saliva pH is an indication of alkali reserves in the alkalophile glands and the urine pH is an indication of the pH of the fluids that surround the cells or the Pishinger’s space.

 

j) The iso-structure of the blood maintains the pH of the blood by pushing off gastrointestinal or metabolic acids into the connective tissue or the Pishinger’s space or the Interstitium. The blood gives to the urine the same amount of acid that it receives from the tissues and liver so it can retain its iso-form. A base deficiency is always related to the deterioration of the deposit ability of the connective tissues or the Pishinger’s space or interstitial fluid spaces. As long as the iso-structure of the blood is maintained, the urine – which originates from the blood – remains a faithful reflected image of the acid-base regulation, not of the blood, but of the tissues. The urine therefore is an excretion product of the connective tissues or the interstitium, not the blood. So when you are testing the pH of your urine, you are testing the pH of the tissues or the interstitial fluids of the Interstitium.

k) A latent “acidosis” is the condition that exists when there are not enough bases in the alkalophile glands because they have been used up in the process of neutralizing the acids adsorbed to the collagen fibers. This leads to compensated “acidosis.” This means the blood pH has not changed but other body systems have changed. This can then lead to decompensated “acidosis” where the alkaline reserves of the blood are used up and the pH of the blood is altered. Decompensated “acidosis” can be determined by testing the blood pH, urine pH and the saliva pH. The decrease in the alkaline reserves in the body occurs because of hyper-proteinization, (eating Meat and Cheese!)or too much protein, and hyper-carbonization, or too much sugar. This is why 80 to 90 year old folks are all shrunk up and look like prunes. They have very little or no alkaline reserves in their alkalophile glands. When all the alkaline minerals are gone, so are you and your battery runs down. The charge of your cellular battery can be measured by testing the ORP or the oxidative reduction potential of the blood, urine or saliva using an ORP meter. As you become more acidic this energy potential or ORP increases.

l) If there is not enough base left over after meat and cheese or surgary meal, or enough base to neutralize and clear the acids stored in the connective tissues or interstitium, a relative base deficiency develops which leads to latent tissue acidosis.When this happens the liver and pancreas are deficient of adequate alkaline juices to ensure proper alkalization of the food in your stomach and small intestine.

m) Digestion or alkalization cannot proceed without enough of these alkaline juices for the liver and pancreas, etc., and so the stomach has to produce more acid in order to make enough base, ad nauseam, and one can develop indigestion, nausea, acid reflux, GERD, ulcers, esophageal cancer and stomach cancer. All of these symptoms are not the result of too much acid or HCL in the stomach. On the contrary, it is the result of too little base in the form of sodium bicarbonate!

n) Therefore the stomach is NOT an organ of digestion as currently taught in ALL biology and medical texts, BUT an organ of contribution or deposit. It’s function is to deposit alkaline juices to the stomach to alkalize the food and to the blood to carry to the alklophile glands!!!!

o) There is a daily rhythm to this acid base ebb and flow of the fluids of the body. The stored acids are mobilized from the connective tissues and Pishinger’s spaces or the spaces of the interstitium while we sleep.

These acids reach their maximum (base tide) concentration in this fluid, and thereby the urine (around 2 a.m. is the most acidic). The acid content of the urine directly reflects the acid content of the fluid in the Pishinger’s spaces, the interstitial fluid compartments of the body. On the other hand, the Pishinger’s spaces become most alkaline around 2 p.m. (the base flood) as then the most sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) is being generated by the cover cells of the stomach to alkalize the food and drink we have ingested.

p) If your urine is not alkaline by 2 p.m. you are definitely in an ACIDIC condition and lacking in alkaline reserves. The pH of the urine should run between 6.8 and 8.4 but ideally 7.2 or greater.

q) After a high protein meal or meat or cheese, the free acids formed such as sulfuric, phosphoric, uric, and nitric acids stick to the collagen fibers to remove them from the blood and protect the delicate pH of the blood at 7.365. The H+ or proton ions from these acids are neutralized by the next base flood, the sodium bicarbonate produced after the meal. The H+ or proton ion combines with the carbonate or HCO3, converts to carbonic acid, H2CO3, which converts to CO2 and H2O. The sulfuric and other acids from proteins are neutralized as follows where the HR represents any acid with the R as its acid radical (SO4, PO4, or NO3) HR + NaHCO3 <=> H2O + NaR (Ca, Mg, K)+ CO2.

r) Medical doctors are not taught the above science in medical school and therefore do not understand the complex chemistry between the stomach, blood and interstitium or even recognize the effects of an acidic lifestyle and diet leading to latent tissue acidosis in the largest organ of the body called the Interstitium. They understand and recognize compensated acidosis and decompensated acidosis in the blood but do not know about or even understand a single thing about the Interstitium. In compensated acidosis, breathing increases in order to blow off more carbonic acid which decreases PCO2 because of the lowered carbonate or HCO3. When the breathing rate can no longer get any faster and when the kidneys can no longer increase its’ function to keep up with the acid load, then the blood pH starts to change from a pH of 7.365 to 7.3 then to 7.2. At a blood pH of 6.95 the heart relaxes and the client goes into a coma or dies.

s) Metabolism of a normal adult diet results in the generation of 50 to 100 meq of H+ or proton per day, which must be excreted if the urine acid-base balance is to be maintained. A meq is a milliequivalent which is an expression of concentration of substance per liter of solution, calculated by dividing the concentration in milligrams per 100 milliliters by the molecular weight. This process involves two basis steps; 1) the reabsorption of the filtered sodium bicarbonate or NaHCO3 and, 2) excretion of the 50 to 100 meq of H+ or proton produced each day by the formation of titratable acidity and NH4+ or ammonium. Both steps involve H+ or proton secretion from the cells of the kidney into the urine.

t) Sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) must be reabsorbed into the blood stream, since the loss of NaHCO3 will increase the net acid load and lower the plasma NaHCO3 concentration. The loss of NaHCO3 in the urine is equivalent to the addition of H+ to the body since both are derived from the dissociation of H2CO3 or carbonic acid.

u) The biochemistry is: CO2 + H2O = H2CO3 = HCO3 + H+. The normal subject must reabsorb 4300 meq of NaHCO3 each day! The secreted H+ or proton ions are generated within the kidney cells from the dissociation of H2O or water. This process also results in the equimolar production OH- or hydroxyl ions. The OH- ions bind to the active zinc-containing site of the intracellular carbonic anhydrase; they then combine with CO2 to form HCO3- ions which are released back into the kidney cells and returned to the systemic circulation. Second, the dietary acid load is excreted by the secretion of H+ or proton ions from the kidney cells into the urine. These H+ or proton ions can do one of two things: the H+ or proton ions can be combined with the urinary buffers, particularly HPO4, in a process called titratable acidity (The biochemistry is: H+ + HPO4 = H2PO4), or the phosphate buffering system or the H+ or proton ions can combine with ammonia (NH3) to form ammonium as follows: NH3 + H+ = NH4.

v) This ammonia is trapped and concentrated in the kidney as ammonium which is then excreted in the urine.

w) In response to acid load, 36% of the H+ or proton goes intracellular in exchange for the release of Na+ (sodium) into the blood stream. 15% of the acid goes intracellular in exchange for K+ (potassium) – common in diabetics. 6% of the H+ or proton or acid goes directly into the cell to be buffered by intracellular processes. 43% is buffered by the interstitium as NaHCO3- or sodium bicarbonate combining with H+ or proton to form H2CO3 or carbonic acid which breaks down to CO2 or carbon dioxide to be released by the lungs. 10% of CO2 or carbon dioxide is excreted through the lungs and 90% is used by the body to reabsorb alkaline minerals and make sodium bicarbonate for buffering gastrointestinal, respiratory, enivronmenta and metabolic acids.

The biochemistry is: CO2 + H2O = H2CO3 = HCO3 + H+.

You can order the following book on sodium and potassium bicarbonate at: http://www.phoreveryoung.com or https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01JLHJ1Y8/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_hsch_vapi_taft_p3_i9

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x) Of all the ways the body can buffer metabolic and dietary acids, the excretion of protein (the eating of meat and cheese) generated acid residues is the only process that does not add sodium bicarbonate back into blood circulation. This creates a loss of bases which is the forerunner of all sickness and disease. In the long run, the only way to replace these lost bases is by eating more alkaline electron-rich green foods and long-chain polyunsaturated fats. Eating meat and cheese is definitely hazardous to your health. That is why I say, “a cucumber a day keeps the doctor away while eating meat, cheese and even an apple creates more excess acid in the colloidal connective tissues of the Schade or the Interstitium, leading to latent tissue acidosis and then sickness, disease and finally death.

y) With over 30 years of research and testing over 500,000 samples of blood and over 1,000,000 samples of urine and saliva I have come to the conclusion that the Human Body is an acid producing organism by function – yet, it is an alkaline organism by design. Eating animal protein, especially meat and cheese and sugar from any source are deadly acidic choices – unless you interested in becoming sick, tired and fat over time.

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z) Bottom line – the pH Miracle Lifestyle and Diet is a program that focuses on the foundational principal that the body is alkaline by design and yet acidic by function. These are my two greatest discoveries. This make this program the ultimate program for preventing and reversing aging and the onset of sickness and dis-ease. I would say that the pH Miracle Lifestyle and Diet is the diet for a longer healthier life free from all sickness and disease. That is why you are seeing a slew of celebrities (Harry and Meghan, Tom Brady, Rhianna, Elle Macpherson, Gwyneth Paltrow, David Beckham, NeNe, Tony Robbins, just to name a few) can attest to the benefits of a pH Miracle alkaline lifestyle and diet and the drinking of alkaline water for improving the quality of their skin, hair and body and to avert over-acidity which often leads to breakouts of the skin and many other health challenges.

Harry and Meghan live an alkaline lifestyle and diet

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Tom Brady is an avid supporter of the alkaline lifestyle and diet and states it is keeping in the game playing the best football of his life!

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David Beckham is a follower of the alkaline lifestyle and diet

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Ellie Macpherson drinks her green drink and tests her pH daily at the age of 54 enjoying extraordinary health and fitness

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Tony Robbins has been teaching Dr. Young’s pH Miracle Lifestyle and Diet to Millions Around the World for Over 20 Years!

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Gwyneth Paltrow has been following the pH Miracle Lifestyle and Diet for over 10 years and attributes her health, energy, vitality, fitness, and anti-aging benefits to this lifestyle and diet.

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Rhianna attributes her glowing skin to the alkaline lifestyle and diet.

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Please remember this very important truth, hydrochloric acid in the stomach is not the cause of digestion but the result of alkalization. Start alkalizing today and begin improving the quality and quantity of your life today.

The Break-Through Research of Robert O Young CPT, MSc, DSc, PhD, Naturopathic Practitioner

My research has linked acidity to every sickness and disease, including enervation, irritation, catarrh, inflammation, induration, ulceration and degeneration. People do not die from disease they die from the inability to maintain the alkaline design of their body. The key to living a long and healthy life is managing the alkaline design of the body. For example pain equals acid and acid equals pain. You cannot have pain with acid. It is that simple! Remove the acid and you remove the pain.

 

The following are 20 suggestions on how to manage the alkaline design of your body and to increase your energy, vitality and quantity and quantity of life which is in your complete control! YOU determine YOUR Destiny!

20 Suggestions for Maintaining the Alkaline Design of YOUR Body for a Longer and Healthier Life

1. Start your day with a large glass of 9.5 alkaline water with the juice of a whole, freshly-squeezed lemon. While lemons are wrongly considered acidic, they are NOT! They are loaded with sodium bicarbonate which means they contribute to your alkaline reserves and protect the blood and interstitium from acid rain.

Be Alkaline and be healthy and loving

Get weekly alkaline tips of the day for leading a long and healthy and compassionate alkaline life when you sign-up as a member of our pH Miracle Fan Club on our facebook page at: https://www.facebook.com/groups/50864627953/

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 2. Better yet, invest in a water filtration system that alkalinizes the water and increases the pH of the water to a 9.5 or greater. Pure water found in nature, which is hard to come by now thanks to acid rain, is quite alkaline. If you’re already drinking purified water, you can also purchase water alkalinizing drops to add to your water bottle and to raise the pH of your water to pH or 9.5 or greater. Here is the link to purchase alkaline pH drops for you water: https://store.phoreveryoung.com/collections/supplements/products/activator-by-ph-miracle-2-fl-oz-59-14ml

3. Eat a large green vegetable salad tossed in alkalizing lemon juice and olive oil. Greens are among the best sources of alkaline minerals like calcium and are high in chlorophyll for building hemoglobin and red blood cell counts.

4. Drink raw organic almond milk. Almonds are packed with natural alkaline minerals like calcium, magnesium and potassium which can help to balance out acidity while buffering another acid called glucose or blood sugar.

5. Drink an Avocado smoothie daily. Using a Vita-mix blender you can blend an avocado with spinach greens, cucumber, celery, ginger and almond milk for an incredible alkalizing and energizing green shake.

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6. Add green powder like wheat grass, barley grass, moringa grass or other greens to your daily diet since these foods that are highly alkalizing and energizing. It’s easy to throw a tablespoon of these greens into your Avocado based almond milk smoothie. To order the best green powder in the World go to: https://store.phoreveryoung.com/collections/supplements/products/innerlight-supergreens

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7. Take a brisk walk, bicycle ride, swim, rebound or some other exercise for at least 30 minutes everyday. Exercise helps move acidic waste products out of the interstitium and through the pores of the skin via perspiration.

8. Breathe deeply. Ideally, choose a spot that has fresh, oxygen-rich air. And, sorry, air filled with Febreze, Glade and all the other so-called “air fresheners,” is not what I’m talking about here. Take a deep breath in through your nose and then switch to breathing through your mouth without letting go of your first inhalation through your nose.

 

9. Go for Meatless and Eggless Mondays. Better yet, opt for meat-free Tuesdays, Wednesdays and other days throughout the week. During the chewing of meat, acid residues like uric acid, nitric acid, sulphuric acid and phosphoric acid residues are left behind for the stomach to address. There is zero health benefits from eating the flesh of another living being. All flesh is acidic and causes a double-loss of alkalinity in the blood and interstitium.

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10. Skip the sugar-laden soda and drink some iJuice Wheat Grass Juice.(www.ijuicenow.com) Sugar is one of the most acidic foods we consume. Sugar is a waste product of metabolism and fermentation. You need over 30 glasses of alkaline water at a pH of 8.4 just to neutralize the acidity (sugar and carbonic acid) of ONE can or bottle of soda.

 

11. Skip the artificially-sweetened diet beverages and other diet products. They contain artificial sweeteners like aspartame (now known as NeoTame), sucralose (also known as Splenda) or saccharin (also known as SugarTwin) and they all cause body warming and acid rain inside your body.

12. Add more green fruit and vegetables to your diet. No, fried potatoes don’t count, including sweet potatoes. Asparagus, green peppers, green string beans, kale, spinach, beet tops, carrot tops, wheat grass, barley grass, broccoli, cucumber, avocado, and lime and other green fruit and vegetables are also excellent choices for supporting the alkaline design of the body.

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13. Instead of slathering your vegetables in acid-forming butter, drizzle alkaline flaxseed oil, hemp seed oil, and/or green olive oil over them.

14. Sprout it out. Add more sprouts to your daily diet like bean sprouts, sunflower seed sprouts and broccoli sprouts. They are extremely alkalizing and supercharged with nutrients and energy-boosting electrons.

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15. Skip ALL desserts or reserve them as occasional treats instead of daily habits. Sugar consumption has been linked to a whole host of health problems and is best minimized or eliminated. If you are in body warming then removing all acidic foods and drinks are a must.

16. Avoid all alcoholic beverages or so-called nutritional supplements that contain alcohol. Alcohol is a devastating acid that causes pancreatic and liver cancer.

17, Avoid corn and peanuts because they are loaded with bacteria, yeast and mold and the cancer causing acid lactic acid.

18. No acidic beverages like coffee, black or green tea or chocolate. They all contain food acids that robs your body of its alkaline reserves causing many diseases, including cancer.

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19. Stay far away from vinegar. Vinegar is pure acid and steals years off your life! Do not believe the so-called health experts to state the vinegar is good for digestion. Remember this very important point. There is only one instrument in the human body that can digest or breakdown food and the is your teeth. When you pour vinegar into your body all you have done is poison yourself. The stomach has to rob alkalinity from the blood, interstitium, organs and glands to buffer this highly toxic chemical setting the stage for enervation, inflammation, induration, ulceration , degeneration and finally death. Vinegar is death in a bottle.

20. Test your urine and saliva and drink pHour Salts every morning. Your ideal pH of your urine and saliva should be at least 7.300. If your pH is lower than 7.300 take a scoop of pHour salts in a small glass of alkaline water. Ideally, you should drink a glass of phour salts which contains sodium bicarbonate, potassium bicarbonate, magnesium chloride and calcium at least 3 times daily. To order pHour salts go to: https://store.phoreveryoung.com/collections/supplements/products/phour-salts-per-case

 

You can also order saliva and urine testing strips at the following link: https://store.phoreveryoung.com/products/phydrion-strips-5-5-8-0?variant=2085775876

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To learn more about the work, research and discoveries of Robert O Young go to the following websites: http://www.drrobertyoung.com, http://www.phmiracleretreat.com, http://www.ijuicenow.com, http://www.innerlightblue.com and http://www.phoreveryoung.com

To learn more read The pH Miracle, The pH Miracle revised and updated, The pH Miracle for Diabetes, The pH Miracle for Weight Loss, The pH Miracle for Cancer and Sick and Tired, just to name a few of Robert O Young’s published books. To order any of these books go to: http://www.phoreveryoung.com

Dr Galina Migalko and I will be key note speakers sharing our research and findings at the 3rd World Congress on Advanced Cancer Science and Therapy on October 15th and 16th in Osaka, Japan.  If you would like to attend our lecture on our break-through science you can email: phmiraclelife@gmail.com
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Our Next pH Miracle Event will be from November 18th to December 2nd – To learn more email us at: phmiracleliving@aol.com
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Lectures From Around The World

Galina MIgalko MSc, MD, NMD and Robert O Young CPT, MSc, DSc, PhD, Naturopathic Practitioner
Galina MIgalko MSc, MD, NMD and Robert O Young CPT, MSc, DSc, PhD, Naturopathic Practitioner 

Come listen and learn from Key Note Speakers, Robert O Young CPT, MSc, DSc, PhD, Naturopathic Practitioner and Galina Migalko MSc, MD, NMD, in four different countries around the World as they lecture on non-invasive medical diagnostics, the interstitium, pH, nutrition and their break-through research on prevention and non-invasive treatments for cancer, diabetes, heart disease, arthritis, osteoporosis, lupus, multiple sclerosis, infections, and many more acidic-caused diseases.

To pre-register for one or more World Conferences please email phmiraclelife@gmail.com and receive an additional 10 to 20 percent discount on the listed early-bird pricing. You can also register by phone by calling 760 484 1075.

When you enroll in one of our Conferences you will receive a credit for a live and dried blood cell analysis, valued at 1200 euros.

Please check out the Countries, Cities, Dates and Pricing below!

Using Sodium and Potassium Bicarbonates in the Prevention and Treatment of ALL Sickness and Disease

Using Sodium and Potassium Bicarbonates in the Prevention and Treatment of ALL Sickness and Disease
Robert Young PhD

Naturopathic Practitioner – The pH Miracle Ti Sana Detox Medical Spa

Using Sodium and Potassium Bicarbonates in the Prevention and Treatment of ALL Sickness and Disease

Abstract

This article suggests that the use sodium and potassium bicarbonates are non-toxic primary alkalizing agents in the prevention and  treatment of all cancers, kidney disease, liver disease, Type I & Type II diabetes, Lupus, heart disease, Pharmacological toxicosis, vascular surgery operation, tonsillar herniation due to cerebral edema, lactic acid toxicosis, and hyponatremia or low salt or loss of salts due to excessive or over-exercise!

[Key words: cancer, diabetes, lupus, heart disease, vascular surgery, herniation, cerebral edema, lactic acid toxicosis, liver disease, kidney disease, hyponatremia, Pharmacological toxicosis]

Introduction

Sodium and potassium bicarbonate are excellent agents for a natural alkaline approach in the treatment for all sickness and disease, including cancer. Sodium bicarbonate is the universal mainstream treatment of acidosis. It is used every day by oncologists to neutralize the heavy acidic nature of their chemical and chemotherapeutic agents which are often quite toxic. Sodium bicarbonate is also used routinely in many clinical situations as herein noted including many peer–reviewed journals:

1) Severe diabetic ketoacidosis (1)

2) Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (2)

3) Pregnancy (3)

4) Hemodialysis (4)

5) Peritoneal dialysis (5)6) Pharmacological toxicosis (6)

7) Hepatopathy (7)

8) Vascular surgery operations (8)

Medics and emergency room medical doctors are accustomed to participating in a flurry of activity when trying to save a persons live after a cardiac arrest–inserting IVs and breathing tubes, performing defibrillation to restart the heart, etc. Sodium bicarbonate is a constant performer under such conditions and is more commonly used than magnesium injections, which is traditionally at the top of every doctor’s protocol for cardiac arrest.

Mainstream oncologists recognize the routine involvement of late stage infections which I refer to as outfections in all cancerous conditions. Medical savants also recognize that bacteria, yeast and mold is present in over forty percent of all cancerous conditions. (9) The most recent research in this area demonstrates how even viruses, which I describe as crystallized acid, is present in fifty percent of certain types of cancerous conditions. (10)

Sodium and potassium bicarbonate increases the hydroxyl ions or electron levels through increased alkalinity to the cells buffering the metabolic acids that can cause cancer.(20)  It is also one of the most basic medicines in allopathic and alternative medicine we have for the treatment of kidney disease.  Research by British scientists at the Royal London Hospital shows that sodium bicarbonate can dramatically slow the progress of chronic kidney disease.(11) We don’t need a thousand years of scientific tests to understand something as simple and essential as alkaline water and it is quite the same with sodium and potassium bicarbonate. Sodium and potassium bicarbonate are always present in the best alkaline drinking waters and organic raw green foods and is constantly being produced by the cover cells of the stomach to alkalize the acidic foods and liquids we ingest, including buffering metabolic and respiratory acids in order to maintain the alkaline design of the blood and tissues at a delicate pH of 7.365.(20)

What is Latent Tissue Acidosis?
Medical doctors are not taught in medical school and therefore do not understand or recognize latent tissue acidosis. They understand and recognize compensated acidosis and decompensated acidosis. In compensated acidosis, breathing increases in order to blow off more carbonic acid which decreases PCO2 because of the lowered carbonate or HCO3. When the breathing rate can no longer get any faster and when the kidneys can no longer increase its’ function to keep up with the acid load, then the blood pH starts to change from a pH of 7.365 to 7.3 then to 7.2. At a blood pH of 6.95 the heart relaxes and the client goes into a coma or dies.

Latent “acidosis” is a condition that exists when there are not enough bases in the alkalophile glands because they have been used up in the process of neutralizing the acids adsorbed to the collagen fibers. This leads to compensated “acidosis.” This means the blood pH has not changed but other body systems have changed. This can then lead to decompensated “acidosis” where the alkaline reserves of the blood are used up and the pH of the blood is altered. Decompensated “acidosis” can be determined by testing the blood pH, urine pH and the saliva pH. The decrease in the alkaline reserves in the body  can occur because of hyper-proteinization, (eating meat and cheese!) or too much protein, and hyper-carbonization, or too much sugar or from excessive or over-excercise. This is why young athletes fall over dead or why 80 to 90 year old folks are all shrunk up and look like prunes. They have very little or no alkaline reserves in their alkalophile glands. When all the alkaline minerals are gone, so are you and your battery runs out of charge. The charge of your cellular battery can be measured by testing the ORP or the oxidative reduction potential of the blood, urine or saliva using an ORP meter. As you become more acidic this energy potential or ORP increases.

How Is Sodium Bicarbonate Created In The Body?

The parietal or cover cells of the stomach split the sodium chloride of the blood. The sodium ion is used to bind with water and carbon dioxide to form the alkaline salt, sodium bicarbonate or NaHCO3. The biochemistry is: H20 + CO2 + NaCl = NaHCO3 + HCL. This is why I call the stomach an alkalizing organ NOT an organ of digestion. The stomach DOES NOT digest the food or liquids we ingest but it alkalizes the foods and liquids we ingest.  We have one instrument in the human body to digest food and it is NOT the stomach it is your teeth.  Once we swallow our food or drink the stomach begins to prepare the food by alkalizing it in a bath of sodium bicarbonate.

For each molecule of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) made, a molecule of hydrochloric acid (HCL) is made and secreted into the so-called digestive system – specifically, the stomach (the gastric pits in the stomach) – to be eliminated via the blood. Therefore HCL is an acidic waste product of sodium bicarbonate created by the stomach to alkalize the food and liquids ingested.

Exercise Creates Metabolic Acidic Waste Products Which Are Harmful To The Blood and Tissues

When one exercises or over-exercises the body needs additional alkaline bicarbonate salts to buffer lactic acids.  The additional bicarbonate is created in the stomach lining to buffer the increased amounts of lactic acids produced as a waste product of metabolism.  The production of sodium bicarbonate will always leave an acidic waste product of hydrochloric acid in the gastric pits of the stomach leading to nausea, light headedness, dizziness, muddle thingking, and poor circulation.  If the excessive exercise continues this can then lead to a dificiency of mineral and bicarbonate salts (electrolytes lost through perspiration or urination) which may lead to latent tissue acidosis, pain, edema, hyponatrenia and death.

But how does something like sodium and/or potassium bicarbonate, so seemingly innocuous have such a dramatic effect? During prolonged or intense exercise muscles produce large amounts of acidic waste products, such as lactic acid, that lead to soreness, stiffness, fatigue and possible edema if these acids are not buffered and eliminated through urination or perspiration. Because sodium and potassium bicarbonate naturally reduces metabolic acids, it acts as a buffer against these performance-limiting by-products.

Current research suggests that supplemental sodium bicarbonate, like the pH Miracle pHour Salts (contains sodium and potassium bicarbonate) is particularly helpful in speed-based events, including sprints, football and other fast-moving games, and middle-distance (up to 10km) running, swimming and cycling. “Essentially, sodium bicarbonate is an alkaline substance that increases the pH of the blood,” Dr Folland says. “This seems to reduce and offset the acidity produced in the muscles during intense, anaerobic exercise that produces lactic acid most quickly, such as fast running or swimming.”

In Dr Folland’s study, swimmers who took the sodium bicarbonate knocked 1.5 seconds off their time for 200m, a difference that may seem insignificant to recreational swimmers but which is substantial at elite level.

“At the last Olympics, the top four swimmers in the men’s 200m freestyle were separated by just 1.4 seconds,” Dr Folland says. “So, in theory, it could be the difference between winning a medal and not.”

Anyone can try it, he says, but only those who are serious enough to monitor their times and progress in sports such as running, swimming or cycling may notice the few seconds advantage it might provide. “The increments of improvement are relatively small to the average person, although significant to someone who competes,” Dr Folland says.

Athletes for years have sworn that taking a spoonful of bicarbonate of soda (baking soda) helps them to keep going for longer. For years, experts doubted that there was anything other than a placebo effect to these claims until they subjected the substance to rigorous examination. Most exercise scientists investigating the trend for “soda-doping” among athletes and gym-goers have shown that it offers significant benefits for endurance and speed.”

At Loughborough University, for instance, physiologists reporting in the June issue of the International Journal of Sports Medicine showed that swimmers who took baking soda about one hour before a 200m event were able to shave a significant time off their usual performances. Dr Jonathan Folland, who led the study, says that it is not uncommon for top swimmers to take sodium bicarbonate (another name for the substance) before a competition to give them an edge. Indeed, he showed that of nine swimmers tested, eight recorded their fastest times after ingesting a supplement of the common baking ingredient – sodium bicarbonate.

Where are Bicarbonates Created In The Human Body and Why?

The chloride ion from the sodium chloride (salt) binds to an acid or proton forming HCL as a waste product of sodium bicarbonate production. HCL has a pH of 1 and is highly toxic to the blood and tissues and the cause of indigestion, acid reflux, ulcers, diabetes, cancer, hyponatremia, edema, tonsilar herniation and death.  When large amounts of acids, including HCL, enter the stomach from a rich animal protein or dairy product meal, such as meat and cheese, or from starchy foods from root vegetables like potatoes or during extreme exercise, acid is withdrawn from the acid-base household. The organism would die if the resulting alkalosis – or NaHCO3 (base flood) or base surplus – created by the stomach was not taken up by the alkalophile glands (salivary glands, pancreas, kidney, pylorus glands, Brunner’s glands, Lieberkuhn glands and liver) that need these quick bases in order to build up their strong sodium bicarbonate secretions. These alkalizing glands and organs are the stomach, pancreas, Brunner’s glands (between the pylorus and the junctions of the bile and pancreatic ducts), Lieberkuhn’s glands in the liver and its bile with its strong acid binding capabilities which it has to release on the highly acidic meat, cheese, potato, acid water or metabolic and/or respiratory acids from over-exercise to buffer its strong acids of nitric, sulphuric, phosphoric, uric and lactic acids in daily metabolism, respiration and excessive or over-exercise.

Bicarbonate acts to stimulate the ATPase by acting directly on it.(12)

The simple household product used for baking, cleaning, bee stings, treating asthma, cancer and acid indigestion is so effective in treating disease that it prevents patients from having to be put on kidney dialysis. The findings have been published in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. Bicarbonate is a truly strong universal concentrated nutritional medicine that works effectively in many clinical situations that we would not normally think of. Bicarbonates of sodium and potassium are a prime emergency room and intensive care medicine that can save a person’s life in a heartbeat and it is also a supermarket item that you can take right off the shelf and use for more things than one can imagine – including diaper rash.

Dr. SK Hariachar, a nephrologist who oversees the Renal Hypertension Unit in Tampa, Florida stated, upon seeing the research on sodium bicarbonate and kidney disease, “I am glad to see confirmation of what we have known for so long.  I have been treating my patients with bicarbonate for many years in attempts to delay the need for dialysis, and now we finally have a legitimate study to back us up. Not only that, we have the added information that some people already on dialysis can reverse their condition with the use of sodium bicarbonate”.

A dialysis technician at the same center as Dr. Hariachar, who used to be on dialysis himself for 2 years as a result of kidney failure, had his kidneys miraculously start functioning to the point where dialysis was no longer needed. He states that he was prescribed oral doses of sodium bicarbonate throughout his treatment, and still takes it daily to prevent recurrences of kidney failure. Dr. Hariachar maintains though, that not everyone will be helped by taking bicarbonate. He says that those patients who have difficulty excreting acids, even with dialysis using a bicarbonate dialysate bath, that, “oral bicarbonate makes all the difference.”

The Stomach, Pancreas and Kidneys Naturally Produce Sodium Bicarbonate Every Day

The exocrine section of sodium bicarbonate from the stomach and the pancreas have been greatly ignored in the treatment of diabetes and cancer even though its impairment is a well documented condition. The stomach and the pancreas is primarily responsible for the production of sodium bicarbonate necessary for normal alkalization of food and liquids ingested. Sodium bicarbonate is so important for protecting the kidney’s that even the kidneys get into the act of producing sodium bicarbonate.  We now know the common denominator between hyponatremia, inflammation, edema, diabetes, kidney disease, and cancer is the lack of sodium and potassium bicarbonate or the body’s inability to produce sodium and potassium bicarbonate because of a lack of mineral salts in the diet. When the body is hit with reductions in sodium bicarbonate output by these three organs,’ acid conditions build up and then the entire body physiology begins to change from a state of oxygenation to fermentation. Likewise when acid build-up outstrips these organs normal sodium bicarbonate capacity, cellular, tissue, glandular and organ deterioration begins.

The stomach, pancreas and the kidneys alone produce about five hundred
grams (about one pound) of sodium and/or potassium bicarbonate per day in an attempt to neutralize dietary and/or metabolic acid in the blood and interstitial fluids that surround the body cells.

The stomach, pancreas and the kidneys monitor and control the acidity or “acid-base” (pH) balance of the blood and tissues. If the blood and tissues are too acidic, the stomach and/or the kidney’s make sodium bicarbonate to restore the blood and tissue pH back to a delicate pH balance of 7.365. If the blood or tissues are too alkaline, then the kidney excretes sodium bicarbonate into the urine to restore the 7.365 alkaline balance. Acid-base balance is the net result of two processes, first, the removal of sodium bicarbonate subsequent to hydrogen ion production from the metabolism or dietary constituents; second, the synthesis of “new” sodium bicarbonate by the stomach and/or the  kidney’s.(13)  The stomach and kidneys pull salt, water and carbon dioxide from the blood to make sodium bicarbonate to maintain the alkaline design of the body during all functions of the body from the ingestion of food or drink to exercise.  The chemical formula is as follows:  NaCl + H2O + CO2 = NaHCO3 + HCL.  The waste product of sodium bicarbonate is hydrochloric acid which is eliminated by kidneys as an acidic excretion of the urine.
It is considered that normal adults eating ordinary Western diets have chronic, low-grade acidosis which increases with age. This excess acid, or acidosis, is considered to contribute to many diseases and to contribute to the aging or rotting process. Acidosis occurs often when the body cannot produce enough sodium bicarbonate ions (or other alkaline compounds) to neutralize the acids in the body formed from metabolism and eating and drinking highly acid foods and drinks like chicken, pork, beef, dairy products, coffee, tea, alcohol, chocolate, soft drinks, just to name a few.  We are also testing bottled mineral water and finding that these waters are acidic and may contribute to overall tissue acidosis.
Acid-buffering by means of base supplementation (The pH Miracle pHour Salts) of sodium bicarbonate is one of the major roles of dialysis. Sodium bicarbonate concentration in the dialysate (solution containing water and chemicals (electrolytes) that passes through the artificial kidney to remove excess fluids and wastes from the blood, also called “bath.”) should be personalized in order to reach a midweek pre-dialysis serum sodium bicarbonate concentration of 22 mmol/l.(14)  Use of sodium bicarbonate in dialysate has been shown in studies to better control some metabolic aspects and to improve both treatment tolerance and patients’ life quality.  Sodium bicarbonate dialysis, unlike acetate-free biofiltration, triggers mediators of inflammation and apoptosis.(15)

One of the main reasons we become over-acid is from over-consumption of animal protein, dairy products, high sugar fruit, grains, alcohol, coffee, tea, chocolate, soft drinks and over-exercise or under-exercise. Eating meat and dairy products may increase the risk of prostate cancer, research suggests.(16) We would find the same for breast and other cancers as well metastatic cancers.(17) Conversely mineral deficiencies are another reason and when you combine high protein intake with decreasing intake of alkaline minerals you have a dis-ease in the making through lowering of pH into highly acidic conditions. When protein breaks down in our bodies they break into strong acids, such as, nitric, uric, sulphuric and phosphoric acid.

Unless a treatment actually removes acidic toxins  from the body and increases oxygen, water, and nutrients most medical interventions come to naught.

These metabolic and dietary acids must be excreted by the kidney’s because they contain sulfur, phosphorus, and/or nitrogen which cannot break down into water and carbon dioxide to be eliminated as weak acids. In their passage through the kidney’s these strong acids of ntric, sulphuric, phosphoric and uric acid must take a basic mineral with them because in this way they are converted into their neutral salts and don’t burn or destroy the kidney’s on their way out. This would happen if these strong acids were excreted in their free acidic form.

Substituting a sodium bicarbonate solution for saline
infusion prior to administration of radiocontrast
material seems to 
reduce the incidence of nephropathy.(18)
Dr. Thomas P. Kennedy
American Medical Association

Sodium and potassoum bicarbonate ions neutralize the acids that cause chronic inflammatory reactions. Hence, sodium and potassium bicarbonate are of benefit in the treatment of a range of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Sodium and potassium bicarbonate are well-studied and used salts with known effects. Sodium and potassium bicarbonate are effective in treating poisonings or overdoses from many chemicals and pharmaceutical drugs by negating their cardiotoxic and neurotoxic effects.(19)  It is the main reason it is used by orthodox oncology – to mitigate the highly toxic effects of chemotherapy.

Sodium and potassium bicarbonates possess the property of absorbing heavy metals, dioxins and furans. Comparison of cancer tissue with
healthy tissue from the same person shows that the cancer tissue
has a much higher concentration of toxic chemicals, pesticides, etc.

Sodium and potassium bicarbonate intravenous infusions are indicated in the treatment of metabolic acidosis, which may occur in severe renal disease, uncontrolled diabetes, and circulatory insufficiency due to shock or severe dehydration, extracorporeal circulation of blood, cardiac arrest, tonsillar herniation due to cerebral edema, severe primary lactic acidosis and hyponatremia due to excessive or over-exercise.  During heavy exercise, if the the resulting lactic acid is not adsorbed by the collagen fibers, the specific acid catchers of the body, the blood pH will drop and the body will go into a coma and the person will die.

The total collection of these fibers is the largest organ of the body called SCHADE, the colloidal connective tissue organ. NO liquid exchange occurs between the blood and the parenchyma cells, or in reverse, unless it passes through this connective tissue organ. This organ connects and holds everything in our bodies in place. This organ is composed of ligaments, tendons, sinew, and the finer fibers that become the scaffolding that holds every single cell in our bodies in place. When acids are stored in this organ, which includes the muscles, inflammation or edema and pain develop. The production of lactic acid is increased with excessive exercise and the ingestion of milk, cheese, yogurt, butter, ice cream, high sugar fruit and starchy root vegetables like potatoes.

That is why I have stated, “acid is pain and pain is acid or acid is edema and edema is pain”.  You cannot have one without the other. This is the beginning of latent tissue acidosis leading to irritation, inflammation, edema and degeneration of the cells, tissues and organs and eventual or sudden death.  It is why we are seeing so many amateur and professional atheletes pass out and die on the playing fields.  Metabolic, respiratory and gastrointestinal acids can and do kill and death can be overted by simply maintaining the alkaline design of the body fluids with protective hydration of alkaine sodium bicarbonate fluids.

The acid/alkaline balance is one of the most overlooked aspects of diagnostic medicine. In general, the world population is heavily acidic, excepting alkalarian vegans (those who ingest raw, organic green fruit, vegetables, mineral salts, alkaline water and unsaturated seed and nut oils), and even their bodies have to face increasing levels of environmental toxic exposure, which may contribute to an acidic pH condition of the blood and then tissues.

With over 30 years of research and testing over 100,000 individual samples of blood and over 100,000 samples of urine and saliva, I have come to the conclusion that the human body is an acidic producing organism by function – yet, it is an alkaline organism by design. Eating animal protein, especially meat and cheese, sugar, fermented foods, starchy foods like potatoes, acidic water, alcohol, coffee, tea, chocolate,  and excessive exercise or under-exercise, obsessive behaviors, lack of rest, lack of sunshine, and emotional stress are deadly acidic lifestyle choices.

All enervation, under-performance, sensitivity, irritation, inflammation, edema, catarrh, induration, ulcerations, degeneration, aging and cancerous conditions are caused by a four letter word – ACID, which is an acronym which stands for:

A = acidic food and drink, attitudes and activities,
C = compromised internal acidic environment,
I = illness and dis-ease, and,
D = desire for more acidic foods, drinks, attitudes and activities, and the cycle repeats itself.[20]

We ingest acidic medicines to lessen the symptoms of our illness. We stimulate the body with unhealthy forms of energy providing quick, often temporary relief from our symptoms which begins the cycle all over again creating a very powerful pattern of poor health and dis-ease.

Conclusion

The pH Alkalizing Lifestyle and Diet is a low acid producing diet and lifestyle that focuses on the foundational principal that the body is alkaline by design and yet acidic by function. This makes this program the ultimate program for preventing and reversing aging and the onset of sickness and disease. I would say that the pH Alkalizing Lifestyle and Diet is the perfect diet and lifestyle for a longer healthier life.(20)

References

1. Gamba, G., “Bicarbonate therapy in severe diabetic ketoacidosis. A double blind, randomized, placebo controlled trial.” (Rev Invest Clin 1991 Jul-Sep;43(3):234-8). Miyares Gom ez A. in “Diabetic ketoacidosis in childhood: the first day of treatment.” (An Esp Pediatr 1989 Apr;30(4):279-83)

2. Levy, M.M., “An evidence-based evaluation of the use of sodium bicarbonate during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.” (Crit Care Clin 1998 Jul;14(3):457-83). Vukmir, R.B., Sodium bicarbonate in cardiac arrest: a reappraisal (Am J Emerg Med 1996 Mar;14(2):192-206). Bar-Joseph, G., “Clinical use of sodium bicarbonate during cardiopulmonary resuscitation–is it used sensibly?” (Resuscitation 2002 Jul;54(1):47-55).

3. Zhang. L., “Perhydrit and bicarbonate improve maternal gases and acid-base status during the second stage of labor.” Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Xiangya Hospital, Hunan Medical University, Changsha 410008. Maeda, Y., “Perioperative administration of bicarbonated solution to a patient with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy.” (Masui 2001 Mar;50(3):299-303).

4. Avdic. E., “Bicarbonate versus acetate hemodialysis: effects on the acid-base status.” (Med Arh 2001;55(4):231-3).

5. Feriani, M., “Randomized long-term evaluation of bicarbonate-buffered CAPD solution.” (Kidney Int 1998 Nov;54(5):1731-8).

6. Vrijlandt, P.J., odium bicarbonate infusion for intoxication with tricyclic antidepressives: recommended inspite of lack of scientific evidence. Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd 2001 Sep 1;145(35):1686-9). Knudsen, K., “Epinephrine and sodium bicarbonate independently and additively increase survival in experimental amitriptyline poisoning.” (Crit Car e Med 1997 Apr;25(4):669-74).

7. Silomon, M., “Effect of sodium bicarbonate infusion on hepatocyte Ca2+ overload during resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock.” (Resuscitation 1998 Apr;37(1):27-32). Mariano, F., “Insufficient correction of blood bicarbonate levels in biguanide lactic acidosis treated with CVVH and bicarbonate replacement fluids.” (Minerva Urol Nefrol 1997 Sep;49(3):133-6).

8. Dement’eva, I.I., “Calculation of the dose of sodium bicarbonate in the treatment of metabolic acidosis in surgery with and deep hypothermic circulatory arresta.” (Anesteziol Reanimatol 1997 Sep-Oct;(5):42-4).

9. “I believe that, conservatively, 15 to 20 percent of all cancer is caused by infections; however, the number could be larger — maybe double,” (Dr. Andrew Dannenberg, Director of the Cancer Center at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center.”) Dr. Dannennberg made the remarks in a speech in December 2007 at the annual international conference of the American Association for Cancer Research.

10. A sexually transmitted virus that causes cervical cancer is also to blame for half of all cases of cancer of the penis.

11.  www.nelm.nhs.uk/en/NeLM-Area/News/2009—July/20/
Bicarbonate-supplementation-may-slow-renal-decline-in-chronic-kidney-disease/

12. Origin of the Bicarbonate Stimulation of Torpedo Electric Organ Synaptic Vesicle ATPase. Joan E. Rothlein  1 Stanley M. Parsons. Department of Chemistry and the Marine Science Institute, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California, U.S.A.

13. Levine DZ, Jacobson HR: The regulation of renal acid secretion: New observations from studies of distal nephron segments. Kidney Int 29:1099–1109, 1986

14.  www.uptodate.com/patients/content/abstract.do?topicKey=~G/p55S8w8sQDwqG&refNum=28

15.  www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16523427

16.  news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/7655405.stm

17.  Cancer Res. 2009 Mar 15;69(6):2260-8. Epub 2009 Mar 10.
Bicarbonate increases tumor pH and inhibits spontaneous metastases.
Robey IFBaggett BKKirkpatrick NDRoe DJDosescu JSloane BFHashim AIMorse DLRaghunand NGatenby RAGillies RJ. Source: Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, USA

18.  JAMA 2004;291:2328-2334,2376-2377.www.urotoday.com/56/browse_categories/renal_transplantation_vascular_disease/
sodium_bicarbonate_may_prevent_radiocontrastinduced_renal_injury.html

19. These include, Benzotropines (valium) cyclic antidepressants (amytriptayine), organophosphates, methanol (Methyl alcohol is a cheap and potent adulterant of illicit liquors) Diphenhydramine (Benedryl), Beta blockers (propanalol) Barbiturates, and Salicylates (Aspirin).   Poisoning by drugs that block voltage-gated sodium channels produces intraventricular conduction defects, myocardial depression, bradycardia, and ventricular arrhythmias. Human and animal reports suggest that hypertonic sodium bicarbonate may be effective therapy for numerous agents possessing sodium channel blocking properties, including cocaine, quinidine, procainamide, flecainide, mexiletine, bupivacaine, and others.

20. www.phmiracle.com. Young.R.O., Young, S.R., The pH Miracle Revised and Updated, Hachett, 2010.

Harvard Trained Immunologist Demolishes California Legislation That Terminates Vaccine Exemptions

78764-babyandvaccines

The following open letter by a PhD Immunologist completely demolishes the current California legislative initiative to remove all vaccine exemptions. That such a draconian and cynical state statute is under consideration in the ‘Golden State’ is as shocking as it is predictable.  After all, it was mysteriously written and submitted shortly after the manufactured-in-Disneyland measles ‘outbreak’.

The indisputable science that is employed by Tetyana Obukhanych, PhD ought to be read by every CA legislator who is entertaining an affirmative vote for SB277.  Dr. Obukhanych skillfully deconstructs the many false and fabricated arguments that are advanced by Big Pharma and the U.S Federal Government as they attempt to implement a nationwide Super-Vaccination agenda.

When the California Senate refuses to consider authoritative scientific evidence which categorically proves the dangerous vaccine side effects on the schoolchildren, something is very wrong. Such conduct by the Senate constitutes criminal action that endangers the lives and welfare of children. Their official behavior must be acknowledged for what it is — CRIMINAL — and prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.

An Open Letter to Legislators Currently Considering Vaccine Legislation from Tetyana Obukhanych, PhD in Immunology

Re:  VACCINE LEGISLATION

Dear Legislator:

My name is Tetyana Obukhanych. I hold a PhD in Immunology.  I am writing this letter in the hope that it will correct several common misperceptions about vaccines in order to help you formulate a fair and balanced understanding that is supported by accepted vaccine theory and new scientific findings.

Do unvaccinated children pose a higher threat to the public than the vaccinated?

It is often stated that those who choose not to vaccinate their children for reasons of conscience endanger the rest of the public, and this is the rationale behind most of the legislation to end vaccine exemptions currently being considered by federal and state legislators country-wide. You should be aware that the nature of protection afforded by many modern vaccines – and that includes most of the vaccines recommended by the CDC for children – is not consistent with such a statement. I have outlined below the recommended vaccines that cannot prevent transmission of disease either because they are not designed to prevent the transmission of infection (rather, they are intended to prevent disease symptoms), or because they are for non-communicable diseases. People who have not received the vaccines mentioned below pose no higher threat to the general public than those who have, implying that discrimination against non-immunized children in a public school setting may not be warranted.

  1. IPV (inactivated poliovirus vaccine) cannot prevent transmission of poliovirus (see appendix for the scientific study, Item #1). Wild poliovirus has been non-existent in the USA for at least two decades. Even if wild poliovirus were to be re-imported by travel, vaccinating for polio with IPV cannot affect the safety of public spaces.  Please note that wild poliovirus eradication is attributed to the use of a different vaccine, OPV or oral poliovirus vaccine. Despite being capable of preventing wild poliovirus transmission, use of OPV was phased out long ago in the USA and replaced with IPV due to safety concerns.
  1. Tetanus is not a contagious disease, but rather acquired from deep-puncture wounds contaminated with C. tetani spores. Vaccinating for tetanus (via the DTaP combination vaccine) cannot alter the safety of public spaces; it is intended to render personal protection only.
  1. While intended to prevent the disease-causing effects of the diphtheria toxin, the diphtheria toxoid vaccine (also contained in the DTaP vaccine) is not designed to prevent colonization and transmission of C. diphtheriae. Vaccinating for diphtheria cannot alter the safety of public spaces; it is likewise intended for personal protection only.
  1. The acellular pertussis (aP) vaccine (the final element of the DTaP combined vaccine), now in use in the USA, replaced the whole cell pertussis vaccine in the late 1990s, which was followed by an unprecedented resurgence of whooping cough. An experiment with deliberate pertussis infection in primates revealed that the aP vaccine is not capable of preventing colonization and transmission of B. pertussis (see appendix for the scientific study, Item #2). The FDA has issued a warning regarding this crucial finding.[1]
  • Furthermore, the 2013 meeting of the Board of Scientific Counselors at the CDC revealed additional alarming data that pertussis variants (PRN-negative strains) currently circulating in the USA acquired a selective advantage to infect those who are up-to-date for their DTaP boosters (see appendix for the CDC document, Item #3), meaning that people who are up-to-date are more likely to be infected, and thus contagious, than people who are not vaccinated.
  1. Among numerous types of H. influenzae, the Hib vaccine covers only type b. Despite its sole intention to reduce symptomatic and asymptomatic (disease-less) Hib carriage, the introduction of the Hib vaccine has inadvertently shifted strain dominance towards other types of H. influenzae (types a through f).These types have been causing invasive disease of high severity and increasing incidence in adults in the era of Hib vaccination of children (see appendix for the scientific study, Item #4).  The general population is more vulnerable to the invasive disease now than it was prior to the start of the Hib vaccination campaign.  Discriminating against children who are not vaccinated for Hib does not make any scientific sense in the era of non-type b H. influenzae disease.
  1. Hepatitis B is a blood-borne virus. It does not spread in a community setting, especially among children who are unlikely to engage in high-risk behaviors, such as needle sharing or sex. Vaccinating children for hepatitis B cannot significantly alter the safety of public spaces. Further, school admission is not prohibited for children who are chronic hepatitis B carriers. To prohibit school admission for those who are simply unvaccinated – and do not even carry hepatitis B – would constitute unreasonable and illogical discrimination.

In summary, a person who is not vaccinated with IPV, DTaP, HepB, and Hib vaccines due to reasons of conscience poses no extra danger to the public than a person who is.  No discrimination is warranted.

How often do serious vaccine adverse events happen?

It is often stated that vaccination rarely leads to serious adverse events. Unfortunately, this statement is not supported by science. A recent study done in Ontario, Canada, established that vaccination actually leads to an emergency room visit for 1 in 168 children following their 12-month vaccination appointment and for 1 in 730 children following their 18-month vaccination appointment (see appendix for a scientific study, Item #5).

When the risk of an adverse event requiring an ER visit after well-baby vaccinations is demonstrably so high, vaccination must remain a choice for parents, who may understandably be unwilling to assume this immediate risk in order to protect their children from diseases that are generally considered mild or that their children may never be exposed to.

Can discrimination against families who oppose vaccines for reasons of conscience prevent future disease outbreaks of communicable viral diseases, such as measles?

Measles research scientists have for a long time been aware of the “measles paradox.” I quote from the article by Poland & Jacobson (1994) “Failure to Reach the Goal of Measles Elimination: Apparent Paradox of Measles Infections in Immunized Persons.” Arch Intern Med 154:1815-1820:

“The apparent paradox is that as measles immunization rates rise to high levels in a population, measles becomes a disease of immunized persons.”[2]

Further research determined that behind the “measles paradox” is a fraction of the population called LOW VACCINE RESPONDERS. Low-responders are those who respond poorly to the first dose of the measles vaccine. These individuals then mount a weak immune response to subsequent RE-vaccination and quickly return to the pool of “susceptibles’’ within 2-5 years, despite being fully vaccinated.[3]

Re-vaccination cannot correct low-responsiveness: it appears to be an immuno-genetic trait.[4]  The proportion of low-responders among children was estimated to be 4.7% in the USA.[5]

Studies of measles outbreaks in Quebec, Canada, and China attest that outbreaks of measles still happen, even when vaccination compliance is in the highest bracket (95-97% or even 99%, see appendix for scientific studies, Items #6&7). This is because even in high vaccine responders, vaccine-induced antibodies wane over time.  Vaccine immunity does not equal life-long immunity acquired after natural exposure.

It has been documented that vaccinated persons who develop breakthrough measles are contagious. In fact, two major measles outbreaks in 2011 (in Quebec, Canada, and in New York, NY) were re-imported by previously vaccinated individuals.[6] – [7]

Taken together, these data make it apparent that elimination of vaccine exemptions, currently only utilized by a small percentage of families anyway, will neither solve the problem of disease resurgence nor prevent re-importation and outbreaks of previously eliminated diseases. 

Is discrimination against conscientious vaccine objectors the only practical solution?

The majority of measles cases in recent US outbreaks (including the recent Disneyland outbreak) are adults and very young babies, whereas in the pre-vaccination era, measles occurred mainly between the ages 1 and 15. Natural exposure to measles was followed by lifelong immunity from re-infection, whereas vaccine immunity wanes over time, leaving adults unprotected by their childhood shots. Measles is more dangerous for infants and for adults than for school-aged children.

Despite high chances of exposure in the pre-vaccination era, measles practically never happened in babies much younger than one year of age due to the robust maternal immunity transfer mechanism. The vulnerability of very young babies to measles today is the direct outcome of the prolonged mass vaccination campaign of the past, during which their mothers, themselves vaccinated in their childhood, were not able to experience measles naturally at a safe school age and establish the lifelong immunity that would also be transferred to their babies and protect them from measles for the first year of life.

Luckily, a therapeutic backup exists to mimic now-eroded maternal immunity. Infants as well as other vulnerable or immunocompromised individuals, are eligible to receive immunoglobulin, a potentially life-saving measure that supplies antibodies directed against the virus to prevent or ameliorate disease upon exposure (see appendix, Item #8).

In summary: 1) due to the properties of modern vaccines, non-vaccinated individuals pose no greater risk of transmission of polio, diphtheria, pertussis, and numerous non-type b H. influenzae strains than vaccinated individuals do, non-vaccinated individuals pose virtually no danger of transmission of hepatitis B in a school setting, and tetanus is not transmissible at all; 2) there is a significantly elevated risk of emergency room visits after childhood vaccination appointments attesting that vaccination is  not risk-free; 3) outbreaks of measles cannot be entirely prevented even if we had nearly perfect vaccination compliance; and 4) an effective method of preventing measles and other viral diseases in vaccine-ineligible infants and the immunocompromised, immunoglobulin, is available for those who may be exposed to these diseases. 

Taken together, these four facts make it clear that discrimination in a public school setting against children who are not vaccinated for reasons of conscience is completely unwarranted as the vaccine status of conscientious objectors poses no undue public health risk. 

Sincerely Yours,

Tetyana Obukhanych, PhD

Tetyana Obukhanych, PhD, is the author of the book Vaccine Illusion.  She has studied immunology in some of the world’s most prestigious medical institutions. She earned her PhD in Immunology at the Rockefeller University in New York and did postdoctoral training at Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA and Stanford University in California.

Dr. Obukhanych offers online classes for those who want to gain deeper understanding of how the immune system works and whether the immunologic benefits of vaccines are worth the risks:  Natural Immunity Fundamentals.

Appendix

Item #1. The Cuba IPV Study collaborative group. (2007) Randomized controlled trial of inactivated poliovirus vaccine in CubaN Engl J Med 356:1536-44

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17429085

The table below from the Cuban IPV study documents that 91% of children receiving no IPV (control group B) were colonized with live attenuated poliovirus upon deliberate experimental inoculation.  Children who were vaccinated with IPV (groups A and C) were similarly colonized at the rate of 94-97%.  High counts of live virus were recovered from the stool of children in all groups.  These results make it clear that IPV cannot be relied upon for the control of polioviruses.

polio chart

Item #2. Warfel et al. (2014) Acellular pertussis vaccines protect against disease but fail to prevent infection and transmission in a nonhuman primate model.Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 111:787-92

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24277828

“Baboons vaccinated with aP were protected from severe pertussis-associated symptoms but not from colonization, did not clear the infection faster than naïve [unvaccinated] animals, and readily transmitted B. pertussis to unvaccinated contacts. By comparison, previously infected [naturally-immune] animals were not colonized upon secondary infection.”

Item #3. Meeting of the Board of Scientific Counselors, Office of Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Tom Harkins Global Communication Center, Atlanta, Georgia, December 11-12, 2013

http://www.cdc.gov/maso/facm/pdfs/BSCOID/2013121112_BSCOID_Minutes.pdf

Resurgence of Pertussis (p.6)

“Findings indicated that 85% of the isolates [from six Enhanced Pertussis Surveillance Sites and from epidemics in Washington and Vermont in 2012] were PRN-deficient and vaccinated patients had significantly higher odds than unvaccinated patients of being infected with PRN-deficient strains.  Moreover, when patients with up-to-date DTaP vaccinations were compared to unvaccinated patients, the odds of being infected with PRN-deficient strains increased, suggesting that PRN-bacteria may have a selective advantage in infecting DTaP-vaccinated persons.”

Item #4. Rubach et al. (2011) Increasing incidence of invasive Haemophilus influenzaedisease in adults, Utah, USA. Emerg Infect Dis 17:1645-50

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21888789

The chart below from Rubach et al. shows the number of invasive cases of H. influenzae(all types) in Utah in the decade of childhood vaccination for Hib.

Hib chart

Item #5. Wilson et al. (2011) Adverse events following 12 and 18 month vaccinations: a population-based, self-controlled case series analysis. PLoS One 6:e27897

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22174753

“Four to 12 days post 12 month vaccination, children had a 1.33 (1.29-1.38) increased relative incidence of the combined endpoint compared to the control period, or at least one event during the risk interval for every 168 children vaccinated.  Ten to 12 days post 18 month vaccination, the relative incidence was 1.25 (95%, 1.17-1.33) which represented at least one excess event for every 730 children vaccinated.  The primary reason for increased events was statistically significant elevations in emergency room visits following all vaccinations.”

Item #6. De Serres et al. (2013) Largest measles epidemic in North America in a decade–Quebec, Canada, 2011: contribution of susceptibility, serendipity, and superspreading events. J Infect Dis 207:990-98

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23264672

“The largest measles epidemic in North America in the last decade occurred in 2011 in Quebec, Canada.”

“A super-spreading event triggered by 1 importation resulted in sustained transmission and 678 cases.”

“The index case patient was a 30-39-year old adult, after returning to Canada from the Caribbean.  The index case patient received measles vaccine in childhood.”

“Provincial [Quebec] vaccine coverage surveys conducted in 2006, 2008, and 2010 consistently showed that by 24 months of age, approximately 96% of children had received 1 dose and approximately 85% had received 2 doses of measles vaccine, increasing to 97% and 90%, respectively, by 28 months of age.  With additional first and second doses administered between 28 and 59 months of age, population measles vaccine coverage is even higher by school entry.”

“Among adolescents, 22% [of measles cases] had received 2 vaccine doses.  Outbreak investigation showed this proportion to have been an underestimate; active case finding identified 130% more cases among 2-dose recipients.”

Item #7. Wang et al. (2014) Difficulties in eliminating measles and controlling rubella and mumps: a cross-sectional study of a first measles and rubella vaccination and a second measles, mumps, and rubella vaccination. PLoS One9:e89361

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24586717

“The reported coverage of the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine is greater than 99.0% in Zhejiang province.  However, the incidence of measles, mumps, and rubella remains high.”

Item #8. Immunoglobulin Handbook, Health Protection Agency

http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20140714084352/http://www.hpa.org.uk/webc/HPAwebFile/HPAweb_C/1242198450982

HUMAN NORMAL IMMUNOGLOBULIN (HNIG):

Indications

  1. To prevent or attenuate an attack in immuno-compromised contacts
  2. To prevent or attenuate an attack in pregnant women
  3. To prevent or attenuate an attack in infants under the age of 9 months

[1] http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm376937.htm

[2] http://archinte.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=619215

[3] Poland (1998) Am J Hum Genet 62:215-220

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9463343

“ ‘poor responders,’ who were re-immunized and developed poor or low-level antibody responses only to lose detectable antibody and develop measles on exposure 2–5 years later.”

[4] ibid

“Our ongoing studies suggest that seronegativity after vaccination [for measles] clusters among related family members, that genetic polymorphisms within the HLA [genes] significantly influence antibody levels.”

[5] LeBaron et al. (2007) Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 161:294-301

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17339511

“Titers fell significantly over time [after second MMR] for the study population overall and, by the final collection, 4.7% of children were potentially susceptible.”

[6] De Serres et al. (2013) J Infect Dis 207:990-998

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23264672

“The index case patient received measles vaccine in childhood.”

[7] Rosen et al. (2014) Clin Infect Dis 58:1205-1210

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24585562

“The index patient had 2 doses of measles-containing vaccine.”

Lose Acidic Weight Eating Pink Organic Grapefruit

Women around the United States tried to burn off body fat by following some version of the Grapefruit Diet. (also known as the Hollywood Diet & the Mayo Clinic Diet)

Dismissed as a fad, the theory behind the Grapefruit Diet was that if you ate half a grapefruit or drank a glass of grapefruit juice with each meal (while reducing your caloric intake down to 800 calories/day), you would lose weight.

And while the 1970s version of the Grapefruit Diet did wonders for grapefruit farmers, it wasn’t very successful at delivering long term weight loss.

Fast forward to 2010….. and the latest scientific research which suggests that eating grapefruit contains phytonutrients that protects the body from acids that make us sick, tired and fat.

Naringenin, an antioxidant flavonoid which chelates dietary and metabolic acid, is derived from the bitter flavor of grapefruit and other citrus fruit, may cause the liver to chelate acid and release fat while increasing insulin sensitivity.

The Theory

  • Normally, after a “normal” meal (consisting of carbs, fats & proteins), your blood is flooded with the metabolic and dietary acid called sugar.
  • This boost in blood acid or sugar results in the activation of your Liver X Receptor Alpha – LXRα.
  • Which results in the production of healthy fats by your liver to bind up the increased acidic sugar for long term storage – ie belly fat, saddle bags, love handles, etc…. The body does this to protect itself from excess dietary or metabolic acid.

The chelation of the acid sugar is good but if not eliminated through the bowels, urine or skin it ends up on you belly, thighs or buttocks.

And, up until this latest research into Naringenin, the only way to prevent this from happening was by reducing your intake of carbohydrates – via fasting or eating low carbohydrates.

But, with Naringenin, you would be able to increase your carbs while still receiving the health benefits of eating low carb:

  • acids being released from your fat cells….
  • resulting in the PPARα receptor being activated in your liver…
  • leading to your body acid stored in the fatty tissues being broken down, while also…
  • causing a reduction in over-all cholesterol production, which is created to bind up toxic acidic sugar.

And that’s not all.

Another benefit of Naringenin is that your PPARγ receptor is activated – resulting in an increase in sensitivity to insulin.

Taken together, all of this good stuff adds up to:

  • No more Type 2 Diabetes
  • No more high cholesterol
  • No more love handles

Naringenin – remember the name and the incredible delicious organic pink grapefruit from the Rancho del Sol and the pH Miracle Living Center.

Organically Grown at the Rancho Del Sol
**Shipping included in price for orders shipped within the continental US**

100% organically grown (without synthetic pesticides, herbicides, or fertilizer), Ruby Red Grapefruits from sunny Southern California. These succulent members of the citrus family are grown in Dr. Robert and Shelley Young’s private orchard, Ranch Avorado. With its unmistakable flavor, these grapefruits offer a subtle sweetness and signature tartness that everyone can enjoy.

Nutritionally, the bitter flavor comes from limonene, a limonoid that gives grapefruit its proven anticarcinogenic properties. Naringine, a flavonoid found in grapefruit, is also effective in preventing cancer. Furthermore, narigine improves blood circulation, while pectin (a soluble vegetable fiber) unclogs arteries.

These organic grapefruits are waiting patiently – remaining on the tree until we receive your order. They are then hand-picked and packaged. Thus, the organic, natural freshness is impeccably preserved. Do your health, taste buds, and the environment a favor – Order today!

Estimated shelf life: 1 week at room temperature
1 month refrigerated
(20-25 grapefruits per box)

Nutrient Composition
(100g of raw edible portion) Energy – 30 kcal
Protein – 0.55 g
Carbohydrates – 7.68 g
Vitamin A – 26 Fg RE
Vitamin B1 – 0.034 mg
Vitamin B2 – 0.02 mg
Niacin – 0.224 mg NE
Vitamin B6 – 0.042 mg
Folate – 12.2 Fg
Vitamin C – 38.1 mg
Calcium – 11 mg
Phosphorus – 9 mg
Magnesium – 8 mg
Iron – 0.12 mg
Potassium- 129 mg
Zinc – 0.07 mg
Total Fat – 0.1 g Saturated Fat – 0.014 g

To order your freshly picked grapefruit go to:

http://phmiracleliving.com/p-510-grapefruits-organic-box-of-9.aspx

Cholesterol Lowering Drugs Cause Heart Attacks, Strokes and Diabetes!

The higher your cholesterol the lower your risk for heart attack or stroke when you are living and eating the standard acid lifestyle and diet (SAD). And, the lower your cholesterol the higher your risk for a heart attack or stroke. (1)

The first graph shows the world famous Lancet published Framingham Study after ten years and the effects of high cholesterol. The second graph shows the study after twenty years. The interesting thing is everyone knows about the first ten years but few people, including doctors have been informed about the Framingham study after twenty years. The Framingham study is the largest and longest reliable study on the effects of chloesterol on the heart and vascular system.(1)
 
Ten years later the study NOW indicates that high cholesterol is NOT a risk for heart attack or stroke. When cholesterol exceeded 300 mg/dl the risk of heart disease was significantly reduced. Eighty percent of people who developed heart disease had cholesterol less than 200 mg/dl.(1)
 
Dr Robert O. Young’s has stated in his research that all heart attacks and strokes are caused by acids from an acidic diet and metabolic acids and NOT high cholesterol. He has suggested that cholesterol, especially low density lipoproteins are created by the body to buffer and protect the blood, organs and tissues from dietary and metaobolic acids. He states the best way to protect the heart and the vascular system is to maintain the alkaline design of the body with an alkaline lifestyle and diet as outline in his book, The pH Miracle Revised and Updated.(2)
 
Just recently the Food and Drug Administration issued new safety warnings about a popular class of drugs used to control and lower cholesterol levels. The FDA says the drugs, known as statins, can cause several side effects, including cognitive problems such as memory lapses and confusion. But the agency is stressing that the side effects appear to be rare and not serious. It is Dr Robert O Young’s research that suggests taking any drug, like statin drugs that lowers LDL cholesterol without removing acidic lifestyle and dietary choices is a risk for heart attack, stroke and other dis-eases like diabetes. Dr Young has lowered cholesterol sucessfully in all cases of hyperchlolesterolemia without drugs by just changing the diet and lifestyle to an alkaline pH Miracle lifestyle and diet that restores the alkaline design of the body.(2)
 
One of Dr. Young’s research clients Maren Hale was diagnosed with familial hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglycerides with LDL’s over 400 mg/dl and triglycerides over 200 mg/dl. She was also overweight. Over a period of four years Maren lost over 70 pounds and lowered her cholesterol and triglycerides to healthy normal ranges on the pH Miracle Lifesyle and Diet. Maren and her family and extended family have been a research study of the University of Utah for familial hypercholesterolemia for over 40 years. Maren was the first of all family members to lower her cholesterol and triglycerides to normal ranges due to her commitment to living a pH Miracle Lifesyle and Diet.(2)
 

 
 
The following is an article that appeared in the Wall Street Journal:
 

The FDA raised safety concerns about the popular class of cholesterol-fighting drugs. The drugs have been taken for years by tens of millions of people and include brand names such as Lipitor and Crestor. Ron Winslow reports on the News Hub. Photo: Getty Images.

The Food and Drug Administration warned that patients taking cholesterol-fighting statins face a small increase in the risk of higher blood-sugar levels and of being diagnosed with diabetes, raising concerns about one of the country’s most widely prescribed groups of drugs.

The federal safety agency said Tuesday it plans to require drug makers to add the diabetes-risk language to the “warnings and precautions” section of the labels on statin drugs.

Statins include top-selling brand names such as Lipitor, Crestor, Zocor and a dozen or so other branded and generic versions under various names. The drugs are prescribed to more than 20 million Americans a year, at a cost of more than $14 billion in 2011, according to the research firm IMS Health.

The warning isn’t expected to prompt doctors to stop prescribing statins for patients with multiple risk factors for heart attack. Cardiologists said for many patients, the benefits of statins still outweigh these risks.

The diabetes issue is “real” but “not a huge effect,” said Robert Califf, vice chancellor for clinical research and a cardiologist at Duke University Medical Center. “Informing people is a good thing, but for the vast majority of people who really need to be on a statin, this shouldn’t change what they do.”

But some physicians cautioned that the risk wasn’t insignificant and that patients at lower risk for heart problems might want to reassess whether they should remain on statins.

“The diabetes issue is a really big deal. We’re overcooking the statin use,” said Eric J. Topol, a prominent cardiologist and chief academic officer of Scripps Health in LaJolla, Calif.

In addition, the FDA said labels for statin drugs now will contain information about patients experiencing memory loss and confusion, though this side effect was classified as an “adverse reaction” rather than one of the warnings and precautions, a more serious category.

Amy Egan, the FDA’s deputy director for safety of metabolic and endocrinological products, said “these cognitive changes can be quite dramatic” and “sustained” but that they disappear when statin therapy is stopped. Dr. Egan said the agency cannot identify a specific drug or age group of people who might be prone to such cases. She said patients should notify their doctors if these symptoms occur.

Bloomberg News

Cholesterol drugs Lipitor and Zocor are arranged on a counter of a Cambridge, Massachusetts pharmacy in 2006.

The FDA made new labeling recommendations for one specific statin, Mevacor, generically called lovastatin. It said that some medicines like protease drugs used to treat AIDS and drugs for bacterial and fungal infections shouldn’t be taken with Mevacor because of interactions that may lead to muscle injury.

At the same time, the FDA announced that drug makers could remove a label warning that liver enzymes need to be monitored during statin therapy. It cited the fact that “serious liver injury with statins is rare and unpredictable” and that periodic monitoring “does not appear to be effective in detecting or preventing this rare side effect.”

AstraZeneca PLC, which makes Crestor, the only major statin still sold exclusively as a brand-name drug, said in a statement that “the cognitive issues are generally nonserious and reversible upon discontinuation” of a statin. It said reports about increased blood sugar were already included on Crestor labels.

In addition to the pure statins, products that contain statins include Advicor, Simcor and Vytorin. Merck & Co., which makes Zocor and Vytorin, said information for those drugs was “updated” in October in a way that reflects the contents of the FDA’s Tuesday safety advisory. It revised labeling for Mevacor more recently.

The FDA’s action follows analyses of large numbers of statin studies in recent years. In one, published in the Lancet in 2010, researchers looked at 13 studies including 91,140 patients. The researchers concluded that statin therapy “is associated with a slightly increased risk of development of [Type 2] diabetes, but the risk is low both in absolute terms and when compared to the reduction in coronary events.”

Cardiologists differed on how to weigh the findings, especially for the millions of people given the drugs for the prevention of a first heart attack or stroke.

Steven E. Nissen, chairman of cardiovascular medicine at the Cleveland Clinic, said, “There is no question that statins slightly increase the risk of a diabetes diagnosis and of slightly higher blood sugar, but I think this has no impact on the risk-benefit assessment. I know I can lower the [relative] risk of death, stroke and heart attack by about 30%” in patients at high risk of such cardiovascular events.

Dr. Topol said research suggests that for every 200 people who take a statin, 1 will develop diabetes. By comparison, 1 to 2 out of 100 patients at risk for a heart attack will avoid one, he said, adding, “That’s a very narrow margin of benefit,” he said.

Rita Redberg, a cardiologist at the University of California, San Francisco Medical Center, stressed the long-term concerns about diabetes. “We know that diabetes is a significant risk factor for heart disease,” Dr. Redberg said. She said the statin-diabetes link “raises the concern that over time the diabetes risk will outweigh the cholesterol-lowering benefit on overall risk of cardiovascular disease.”

Reference:
(1) Martin MJ et al, Lancet 1986; H-933-936
(2) The pH Miracle Revised and Update, Pub. July 2010, Hachett Publishing

Will Soy Prevent or Reverse Disease?



Will Eating and/or Drinking Soy Prevent or Reverse Dis-ease or So-called Disease?

Cancer is a group of dis-eases characterized by the uncontrolled fermentation and degeneration of body cells. Over 10 million Americans today are cancer survivors, and about 1.4 million Americans are expected to be diagnosed each year.1

“Diet plays an important role in the prevention and treatment of ALL cancerous conditions, and soy protein is one of the leading anti-acid or alkalizing and therefore anti-carcinogenic foods being studied,” stated Dr. Robert O. Young, Director of Research at the pH Miracle Living Center.

SOY FOODS & CANCER

There has been much focus during the past 15 years on the anticancer effects of soy foods.2There are several presumed chemopreventive agents in the soy bean,6 but the isoflavones have received the most attention.3 A particular interest lies in the role of soy foods and isoflavones in reducing the risk of breast and prostate cancer.2

SOY & BREAST CANCER

Data modestly supports the hypothesis that soy food intake may reduce the incidence of breast cancer. A recently published analysis found the relative risk for breast cancer was 95 percent when comparing high- vs. low-soy consumers.5 However, many of the case-control and prospective studies included in this analysis were of poor quality.6

Rodent studies have generally shown that isoflavones, or soy protein, inhibit chemically induced mammary tumors when given prior to tumor initiation7-9, although there are a number of exceptions.10-12 Interestingly, the chemopreventive effects of isoflavones appear to be affected by the background dietary choices.

When the isoflavone genistein was added to the semi-purified diet, chemically induced rodent mammary tumors were not inhibited, but when added to the regular chow diet, tumor development was suppressed by approximately 50 percent.13 This suggests that animal research, which most commonly uses semi-purified diets, may actually underestimate the potential anticarcinogenic effects of soy and other foods.

Soy & Markers of Breast Cancer

In contrast to the animal and epidemiologic data, there is little clinical evidence that soy or isoflavones favorably affect markers of breast cancer risk including breast tissue density,14, 15serum estrogen levels,16, 17 and breast cell proliferation.18 There is limited evidence that estrogen metabolism is favorably affected19 and that menstrual cycle length is increased (which decreases cancer risk).16

Nevertheless, there remains considerable enthusiasm for the possibility that soy food intake contributes to the low breast cancer rate in Japan.

Early Intake of Soy May Reduce Breast Risk

There is both epidemiologic 20-22 and animal 23, 24 data in support of the hypothesis that early soy intake reduces later risk of developing breast cancer. This hypothesis is consistent with mounting evidence that early life influences — parity, lactation, age at menses, birth weight, etc. — impact risk of developing breast cancer.25-36 Studies of migrants suggest that the first 20 years of life have an especially profound impact on risk.36-38 The epidemiologic data suggest just one to two servings of soy foods is protective.

Breaking News – Soy Breast Cancer Study

Soy Breast Cancer Study Holds Promise, But Calls for Further Research

For more than 15 years, soy foods have been actively investigated for their possible role in reducing breast cancer risk. Initial enthusiasm about this hypothesis was based on several observations. These include the low breast cancer rates in Japan, early animal research indicating that soy beans in rodent diets reduced mammary tumor development and evidence suggesting that the isoflavones (phytoestrogens) in soy foods may exert anti-estrogenic effects.

However, establishing a relationship between cancer risk and diet – especially specific foods – is much more difficult than establishing such links in the case of other chronic diseases such as coronary heart disease. This is because there are few well-established non-invasive indicators of cancer risk, and studies are very rarely conducted for long enough to measure actual differences in tumor incidence. Consequently, it is difficult to claim with confidence whether a particular intervention increases or decreases the chances of developing cancer.

Epidemiologic research is a useful mode of investigation for exploring a relationship between diet and cancer. Epidemiology is the study of the patterns, causes, and control of disease in groups of people. There are two primary types of epidemiologic studies, case-control and prospective studies. In case-control studies, scientists compare people with cancer to those without in hopes of identifying characteristics such as lifestyle or diet that are more common to one group than the other. In prospective studies, scientists first evaluate the characteristics of a large group of healthy people, then follow those subjects for many years in hopes of identifying whether certain factors are more common to those who develop cancer than to those who don’t. Generally, prospective studies are considered more credible than case-control studies. It is important to recognize, however, that epidemiologic studies cannot establish cause and effect relationships. Only clinical trials can do that. But epidemiologic studies are often used as a basis for clinical research.

To evaluate the relationship between soy intake and breast cancer risk, Bruce Trock and colleagues from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and Georgetown University conducted a meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies. A meta-analysis is the statistical analysis of a large collection of results from individual studies for the purpose of integrating the findings. This particular analysis included 12 case-control studies and 6 prospective studies. The major finding of this analysis was that when all women (Asian and non-Asian, pre- and postmenopausal) were considered, soy intake was associated with a 14% reduction in breast cancer risk. That is, women consuming higher quantities of soy were 14% less likely to develop breast cancer than women who consumed relatively little soy. However, subgroup analysis revealed that soy was more protective against pre- compared to postmenopausal breast cancer, and was protective in studies involving non-Asian women but not Asian women.

The analysis by Trock and colleagues provides modest support for the notion that soy may protect against breast cancer. A 14% reduction is certainly noteworthy, but for several reasons the study results should be interpreted with caution.

First, in many studies, soy intake was not actually quantified. Rather, it was estimated based on the urinary excretion of isoflavones. Because urinary isoflavone excretion varies so much from person to person, it provides only a rough approximation of soy intake. Furthermore, although soy was found to be protective in studies involving non-Asian women, the intake of soy by the women in these studies was quite low. There is some doubt as to whether such low intakes are sufficient to exert biological effects. Since soy foods are still consumed by only a minority of people in non-Asian countries – and are often favored by especially health-conscious individuals – we must consider the possibility that the perceived cancer-protective effects of soy may result from an overall healthy lifestyle, rather than soy consumption per se. Although the researchers employed statistical techniques to try to separate the effects of soy from other factors common to people who eat soy, this is very difficult to do.

While some evidence, including the new analysis by Trock and colleagues, suggests soy foods may reduce breast cancer risk, no conclusions can be made at this time. Nevertheless, because soy foods provide excellent nutrition, they can play an important role in an overall healthy diet, regardless of their possible relationship to breast cancer protection.

SOY & PROSTATE CANCER

The soy bean isoflavone genistein inhibits the growth of both androgen-dependent39-42 and androgen-independent39, 42-45 prostate cancerous cells, depending on the level of soy doses administered. In addition, genistein inhibits the invasive capacity of prostate cancerous cells 42and enhances the ability of radiation to kill these cells.46 However, the concentration of genistein required to exert these effects is higher than the serum isoflavone levels of people who eat soy foods.47-49 Nevertheless, several observations suggest these effects are biologically relevant.39,44-49

Regional Diets Can Impact Prostate Cancer

In Japan, although many men have prostate cancer, few die of this dis-ease. This is because the small tumors often referred to as latent prostate cancer, not uncommon to Japanese men, rarely progress to the more advanced form of this disease.51, 52 Isoflavones in combination with tea extracts were shown to reduce tumor growth in mice more effectively than either agent alone.9

In Asia, and especially in Japan, where prostate cancer mortality rates are low, both soy foods and tea are important components of their diet. There are likely several factors that contribute to this clinical situation in Japanese men and according to the International Prostate Health Council, and isoflavone intake from soy foods may be one.53

There has been limited epidemiologic investigation of the relationship between soy intake and prostate cancer. These studies have produced mixed results but can be said to be consistent with the hypothesis that soy intake reduces prostate cancer risk.

A recent analysis of 10 epidemiologic studies found that soy intake was associated with a one-third reduction in prostate cancer risk.5 However, many of the epidemiologic studies involved a small number of cases54, 55 and/or did not comprehensively evaluate soy food intake. However, a recent comprehensive Japanese case-control study found that when comparing the highest with the lowest soy food intake cases, risk was reduced by nearly 50 percent.56

Soy May Help Treat Existing Prostate Cancer

Data suggests that soy foods may be useful in the treatment of existing prostate cancer, but this remains speculative. A study of 11 trials, three involving healthy subjects57-59 and eight involving prostate cancer patients,60-67 examined the effects of isoflavones on PSA levels. No benefits were noted in healthy subjects, but among the cancer patients one-half noted favorable effects.68Recent intervention data demonstrate that reducing prostate cancer risk is not dependent upon reductions in PSA levels.69

References

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  7. Messina MJ, Loprinzi CL. Soy for breast cancer survivors: a critical review of the literature.J Nutr 2001;131:3095S-3108S.
  8. Magee PJ, Rowland IR. Phyto-oestrogens, their mechanism of action: current evidence for a role in breast and prostate cancer. Br J Nutr 2004;91:513-531.
  9. Zhou JR, Yu L, Mai Z, Blackburn GL. Combined inhibition of estrogen-dependent human breast carcinoma by soy and tea bioactive components in mice. Int J Cancer 2004;108:8-14.
  10. Cohen LA, Zhao Z, Pittman B, Scimeca JA. Effect of intact and isoflavone-depleted soy protein on NMU-induced rat mammary tumorigenesis. Carcinogenesis 2000;21:929-935.
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  15. Maskarinec G, Takata Y, Franke AA, Williams AE, Murphy SP. A 2-year soy intervention in premenopausal women does not change mammographic densities. J Nutr2004;134:3089-3094.
  16. Kurzer MS. Hormonal effects of soy in premenopausal women and men. J Nutr2002;132:570S-573S.
  17. Maskarinec G, Franke AA, Williams AE, Hebshi S, Oshiro C, Murphy S, Stanczyk FZ. Effects of a 2-year randomized soy intervention on sex hormone levels in premenopausal women. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2004;13:1736-1744.
  18. Palomares MR, Hopper L, Goldstein L, Lehman CD, Storer BE, Gralow JR. Effect of soy isoflavones on breast proliferation in postmenopausal breast cancer survivors. Breast Cancer Res Treatment 2004;88 (Suppl 1):4002.
  19. Brown BD, Thomas W, Hutchins A, Martini MC, Slavin JL. Types of dietary fat and soy minimally affect hormones and biomarkers associated with breast cancer risk in premenopausal women. Nutr Cancer 2002;43:22-30.
  20. Shu XO, Jin F, Dai Q, Wen W, Potter JD, Kushi LH, Ruan Z, Gao YT, Zheng W. Soy food Intake during Adolescence and Subsequent Risk of Breast Cancer among Chinese Women.Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2001;10:483-488.
  21. Wu AH, Wan P, Hankin J, Tseng CC, Yu MC, Pike MC. Adolescent and adult soy intake and risk of breast cancer in Asian-Americans. Carcinogenesis 2002;23:1491-1496.
  22. Korde L, Fears T, Wu A, West D, Pike M, Hoover R, Ziegler R. Adolescent and childhood soy intake and breast cancer risk in Asian-American women. Breast Cancer Res Treat2005;88 (suppl 1):S149.
  23. Lamartiniere CA, Zhao YX, Fritz WA. Genistein: mammary cancer chemoprevention, in vivo mechanisms of action, potential for toxicity and bioavailability in rats. J Women’s Cancer 2000;2:11-19.
  24. Hilakivi-Clarke L, Onojafe I, Raygada M, Cho E, Skaar T, Russo I, Clarke R. Prepubertal exposure to zearalenone or genistein reduces mammary tumorigenesis. Br J Cancer1999;80:1682-1688.
  25. Russo J, Lareef H, Tahin Q, Russo IH. Pathways of carcinogenesis and prevention in the human breast. Eur J Cancer 2002;38 Suppl 6:S31-32.
  26. Hamilton AS, Mack TM. Puberty and genetic susceptibility to breast cancer in a case-control study in twins. N Engl J Med 2003;348:2313-2322.
  27. Elias SG, Peeters PH, Grobbee DE, van Noord PA. Breast cancer risk after caloric restriction during the 1944-1945 Dutch famine. J Natl Cancer Inst 2004;96:539-546.
  28. Michels KB, Ekbom A. Caloric restriction and incidence of breast cancer. JAMA2004;291:1226-1230.
  29. Lee SY, Kim MT, Kim SW, Song MS, Yoon SJ. Effect of lifetime lactation on breast cancer risk: a Korean women’s cohort study. Int J Cancer 2003;105:390-393.
  30. Leon DA, Carpenter LM, Broeders MJ, Gunnarskog J, Murphy MF. Breast cancer in Swedish women before age 50: evidence of a dual effect of completed pregnancy. Cancer Causes Control 1995;6:283-291.
  31. Zheng T, Duan L, Liu Y, Zhang B, Wang Y, Chen Y, Zhang Y, Owens PH. Lactation reduces breast cancer risk in Shandong Province, China. Am J Epidemiol 2000;152:1129-1135.
  32. Zheng T, Holford TR, Mayne ST, Owens PH, Zhang Y, Zhang B, Boyle P, Zahm SH. Lactation and breast cancer risk: a case-control study in Connecticut. Br J Cancer2001;84:1472-1476.
  33. Vatten L. Can prenatal factors influence future breast cancer risk? Lancet 1996;348:1531.
  34. Michels KB, Trichopoulos D, Robins JM, Rosner BA, Manson JE, Hunter DJ, Colditz GA, Hankinson SE, Speizer FE, Willett WC. Birthweight as a risk factor for breast cancer.Lancet 1996;348:1542-1546.
  35. Freudenheim JL, Marshall JR, Vena JE, Moysich KB, Muti P, Laughlin R, Nemoto T, Graham S. Lactation history and breast cancer risk. Am J Epidemiol 1997;146:932-938.
  36. Hemminki K, Li X. Cancer risks in second-generation immigrants to Sweden. Int J Cancer 2002;99:229-237.
  37. Shimizu H, Ross RK, Bernstein L, Yatani R, Henderson BE, Mack TM. Cancers of the prostate and breast among Japanese and white immigrants in Los Angeles County. Br J Cancer 1991;63:963-966.
  38. Hemminki K, Li X, Czene K. Cancer risks in first-generation immigrants to Sweden. Int J Cancer 2002;99:218-228.
  39. Peterson G, Barnes S. Genistein and biochanin A inhibit the growth of human prostate cancer cells but not epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine autophosphorylation.Prostate 1993;22:335-345.
  40. Onozawa M, Fukuda K, Ohtani M, Akaza H, Sugimura T, Wakabayashi K. Effects of soy bean isoflavones on cell growth and apoptosis of the human prostatic cancer cell line LNCaP. Jpn J Clin Oncol 1998;28:360-363.
  41. Shen JC, Klein RD, Wei Q, Guan Y, Contois JH, Wang TT, Chang S, Hursting SD. Low-dose genistein induces cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors and G(1) cell-cycle arrest in human prostate cancer cells. Mol Carcinog 2000;29:92-102.
  42. Santibanez JF, Navarro A, Martinez J. Genistein inhibits proliferation and in vitro invasive potential of human prostatic cancer cell lines. Anticancer Res 1997;17:1199-1204.
  43. Naik HR, Lehr JE, Pienta KJ. An in vitro and in vivo study of antitumor effects of genistein on hormone refractory prostate cancer. Anticancer Res 1994;14:2617-2619.
  44. Kyle E, Neckers L, Takimoto C, Curt G, Bergan R. Genistein-induced apoptosis of prostate cancer cells is preceded by a specific decrease in focal adhesion kinase activity. Mol Pharmacol 1997;51:193-200.
  45. Bhatia N, Agarwal R. Detrimental effect of cancer preventive phytochemicals silymarin, genistein and epigallocatechin 3-gallate on epigenetic events in human prostate carcinoma DU145 cells. Prostate 2001;46:98-107.
  46. Hillman GG, Forman JD, Kucuk O, Yudelev M, Maughan RL, Rubio J, Layer A, Tekyi-Mensah S, Abrams J, Sarkar FH. Genistein potentiates the radiation effect on prostate carcinoma cells. Clin Cancer Res 2001;7:382-390.
  47. Doerge DR, Chang HC, Churchwell MI, Holder CL. Analysis of soy isoflavone conjugation in vitro and in human blood using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Drug Metab Dispos 2000;28:298-307.
  48. Chang HC, Churchwell MI, Delclos KB, Newbold RR, Doerge DR. Mass spectrometric determination of Genistein tissue distribution in diet-exposed Sprague-Dawley rats. J Nutr2000;130:1963-1970.
  49. Dalu A, Haskell JF, Coward L, Lamartiniere CA. Genistein, a component of soy, inhibits the expression of the EGF and ErbB2/Neu receptors in the rat dorsolateral prostate. Prostate1998;37:36-43.
  50. Messina M. Emerging evidence on the role of soy in reducing prostate cancer risk. Nutr Rev 2003;61:117-131.
  51. Yatani R, Kusano I, Shiraishi T, Hayashi T, Stemmermann GN. Latent prostatic carcinoma: pathological and epidemiological aspects. Jpn J Clin Oncol 1989;19:319-326.
  52. Shibata A, Whittemore AS, Imai K, Kolonel LN, Wu AH, John EM, Stamey TA, Paffenbarger RS. Serum levels of prostate-specific antigen among Japanese-American and native Japanese men. J Natl Cancer Inst 1997;89:1716-1720.
  53. Griffiths K. Estrogens and prostatic disease. International Prostate Health Council Study Group. Prostate 2000;45:87-100.
  54. Jacobsen BK, Knutsen SF, Fraser GE. Does high soy milk intake reduce prostate cancer incidence? The Adventist Health Study (United States) [see comments]. Cancer Causes Control 1998;9:553-557.
  55. Severson RK, Nomura AM, Grove JS, Stemmermann GN. A prospective study of demographics, diet, and prostate cancer among men of Japanese ancestry in Hawaii.Cancer Res 1989;49:1857-1860.
  56. Lee MM, Gomez SL, Chang JS, Wey M, Wang RT, Hsing AW. Soy and isoflavone consumption in relation to prostate cancer risk in China. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev2003;12:665-668.
  57. Urban D, Irwin W, Kirk M, Markiewicz MA, Myers R, Smith M, Weiss H, Grizzle WE, Barnes S. The Effect of Isolated Soy Protein on Plasma Biomarkers in Elderly Men with Elevated Serum Prostate Specific Antigen. J Urol 2001;165:294-300.
  58. Adams KF, Chen C, Newton KM, Potter JD, Lampe JW. Soy isoflavones do not modulate prostate-specific antigen concentrations in older men in a randomized controlled trial.Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2004;13:644-648.
  59. Jenkins DJ, Kendall CW, D’Costa MA, Jackson CJ, Vidgen E, Singer W, Silverman JA, Koumbridis G, Honey J, Rao AV, Fleshner N, Klotz L. Soy consumption and phytoestrogens: effect on serum prostate specific antigen when blood lipids and oxidized low-density lipoprotein are reduced in hyperlipidemic men. J Urol 2003;169:507-511.
  60. Hussain M, Banerjee M, Sarkar FH, Djuric Z, Pollak MN, Doerge D, Fontana J, Chinni S, Davis J, Forman J, Wood DP, Kucuk O. Soy isoflavones in the treatment of prostate cancer. Nutr Cancer 2003;47:111-117.
  61. Fischer L, Mahoney C, Jeffcoat AR, Koch MA, Thomas BE, Valentine JL, Stinchcombe T, Boan J, Crowell JA, Zeisel SH. Clinical characteristics and pharmacokinetics of purified soy isoflavones: multiple-dose administration to men with prostate neoplasia. Nutr Cancer2004;48:160-170.
  62. deVere White RW, Hackman RM, Soares SE, Beckett LA, Li Y, Sun B. Effects of a genistein-rich extract on PSA levels in men with a history of prostate cancer. Urology2004;63:259-263.
  63. Spentzos D, Mantzoros C, Regan MM, Morrissey ME, Duggan S, Flickner-Garvey S, McCormick H, DeWolf W, Balk S, Bubley GJ. Minimal effect of a low-fat/high soy diet for asymptomatic, hormonally naive prostate cancer patients. Clin Cancer Res 2003;9:3282-3287.
  64. Jarred RA, Keikha M, Dowling C, McPherson SJ, Clare AM, Husband AJ, Pedersen JS, Frydenberg M, Risbridger GP. Induction of Apoptosis in Low to Moderate-Grade Human Prostate Carcinoma by Red Clover-derived Dietary Isoflavones. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2002;11:1689-1696.
  65. Kumar NB, Cantor A, Allen K, Riccardi D, Besterman-Dahan K, Seigne J, Helal M, Salup R, Pow-Sang J. The specific role of isoflavones in reducing prostate cancer risk. Prostate2004;59:141-147.
  66. Dalais FS, Meliala A, Wattanapenpaiboon N, Frydenberg M, Suter DA, Thomson WK, Wahlqvist ML. Effects of a diet rich in phytoestrogens on prostate-specific antigen and sex hormones in men diagnosed with prostate cancer. Urology 2004;64:510-515.
  67. Kranse R, Dagnelie PC, van Kemenade MC, de Jong FH, Blom JH, Tijburg LB, Weststrate JA, Schroder FH. Dietary intervention in prostate cancer patients: PSA response in a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study. Int J Cancer 2005;113:835-840.
  68. Messina M, Kucuk O, Lampe J. An overview of the health effects of isoflavones with an emphasis on prostate cancer risk and prostate specific antigen levels. JAOAC; (accepted).
  69. Meyer F, Galan P, Douville P, Bairati I, Kegle P, Bertrais S, Estaquio C, Hercberg S. Antioxidant vitamin and mineral supplementation and prostate cancer prevention in the SU.VI.MAX trial. Int J Cancer 2005;116:182-186.

What Causes the Elevation of Cholesterol Levels In the Blood?

After all, what causes the elevation of cholesterol levels in blood?

The following are some suggestions from the medical literature about factors, beyond the famous but wronged and simplistic idea that foods based on saturated fats cause the development of atherosclerosis (1, 22), suggesting that stress, high carbohydrate diets (sugar acid) and smoke may raise total cholesterol and low density lipoproteins levels:

1. Stress increases metabolic acids
a) Anxiety and cholesterol elevation (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11)
b) Hostility and cholesterol elevation (12, 13, 14)
c) Extreme physical exertion and cholesterol elevation (15)

2) High carbohydrate diets or the acid sugar and cholesterol elevation (16, 17, 18).

Continue reading What Causes the Elevation of Cholesterol Levels In the Blood?

The Dangers of Drinking Cow’s Milk!

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Due to the extreme processes that milk goes through and the high amounts of antibiotics, hormones, and genetically-modified substances that cows are continually exposed to, I believe there are real and eminent concerns associated with drinking milk from cows. All cows release toxins through their milk, as milk is a natural exit-portal for substances that the body cannot use.

“Ingredients” Added to Cow’s Milk

A Veritable Hormone Cocktail: including pituitary, steroid, hypothalamic, and thyroid hormones (remember most cows are extremely stressed)

Gastrointestinal Peptides: Nerve and epidermal growth factors, and the growth inhibitors MDGI and MAF rBGH (Recombinant Bovine Growth Hormone): a genetically engineered hormone directly linked to breast, colon and prostrate cancer. This is injected into cows to increase milk production[1]

Pus: National averages show at least 322 million cell-counts of pus per glass! [2] This is well-above the human limit for pus-intake, and has been directly linked to paratuberculosis bacteria, as well as Crohn’s disease. The pus comes from infected udders on the cows known as mastitis.

Blood Cells: The USDA allows up to 1.5 million white blood cells per milliliter of commonly-sold milk. [3] Yes, you are drinking cows blood in the milk and the USDA allows this!

Antibiotics: Currently, cows are in such a state of disease and mistreatment that they are continually being injected with antibiotic medicines, and rubbed down with chemical-laden ointments to deal with their chronic infections. Currently, regulating committees only test for 4 of the 85 drugs in dairy cows. This means that the other 81 drugs in cow’s milk are coming directly into your glasses and bodies.

Estimates show that 38% of milk in the U.S. is “contaminated with sulfa drugs or other antibiotics,” according to a study by the Centre for Science in the Public Interest and published in the Wall Street Journal on December 29, 1989. A study from the FDA data showed that over half of all milk was laden with traces of pharmaceuticals yet nothing has been done to control this.

How Does This Affect the Cows?

Not only are people drinking these toxins, they are also taking in the energetic effects of the life of the cow.

Studies show that many cows are infected with incredibly painful infections such as mastitis. [4] Due to over-milking, artificial hormones, bacteria and medications, cow’s udders can become chronically inflamed, thus altering the color and taste of the milk.

Over time, this bacterial invasion causes harm to the cow’s mammary gland, reeking havoc on the milk being produced. From parasitic worms to cancerous tumors, these diseases are often passed along to the next generation of cows, and more often, into the milk we drink.

Often times the conditions in which cows live, as well as the rigorous milking regimes, cause dairy cattle to live in a permanent state of sympathetic (stress) response, as well as adrenal over-load. When our adrenal glands are overworked for long periods of time, there is a overload of cortisol in the blood. When we drink this milk, we are then exposed to the millions of stress-response cells in the milk of cows. It is no wonder that we are a chronically stressed society!

Avoid Dangers Related to Cow’s Milk

Here are some ways to avoid the dangers associated with cow’s milk:

Replace cow’s milk with healthy natural substitutes: raw almond milk, raw hazel nut milk, raw coconut milk or my favorite – hemp milk.

If you do insist on drinking cow’s milk, make sure to buy only the non-genetically modified, range fed, organic raw versions. Even better, talk to your local organic farmer to make sure the cow’s are treated kindly.

Eliminate cheese because it is concentrated milk and always buy organic versions. Goat’s milk or cheese would be a better choice if you choose to continue to drink animal milk!

– Dr. Edward F. Group III, DC, ND, DACBN, DCBCN, DABFM

References:
The Cancer Prevention Coalition and Food & Water. New study Warns of Breast and Colon Cancer Risks from rBGH Milk. 1996 January 23.
PETA. Cows Used for Their Milk. The Dairy Industry.
Adkinson RW, Gough RH, Graham R, Yilmaz A. Implications of proposed changes in bulk tank somatic cell count regulations. J Dairy Sci. 2001 Feb;84(2):370-4
The Merck Veterinary Manual. Mastitis in Cattle. Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.