Category Archives: Research

The Many Health Benefits of an Alkaline pH Miracle Lifestyle and Diet

The Health Benefits of an Alkaline pH Miracle Lifestyle and Diet

Robert Young

Research Scientist at the pH Miracle Center

A slew of celebrities (Harry and Meghan, Tom Brady, Rhianna, Elle Macpherson, Gwyneth Paltrow, David Beckham, NeNe, Tony Robbins, just to name a few) can attest to the benefits of an alkaline lifestyle and diet and the drinking of alkaline water for improving the quality of their skin, hair and body and to avert over-acidity which often leads to breakouts of the skin and many other health challenges.

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“Your health depends on the balance of an alkaline environment, created by eating foods such as tomatoes, avocados and green vegetables… and regulating your body’s acid/alkaline chemistry through simple changes in diet can result in weight loss, increased stamina and strength, a stronger immune system and a greater sense of wellbeing,” details Robert O. Young, Scientist and Author of The pH Miracle book series.

Robert O Young, CPT, MSc, DSc, PhD, Naturopathic Practitioner also suggests. “including more alkalizing foods such as green fruit and green vegetables in one’s diet while drinking lots of alkaline water at a pH of 9.5 is the real key to restoring pH balance and overall skin, hair, blood and body health. When dealing with metabolic, respiratory, environmental and dietary acidic waste from within, the body does what it can and that’s to eliminate these acidic wastes before they damage healthy blood and body cells. The skin is the largest elimination organ for removing these toxic acidic wastes through the pores of the skin and can be significantly compromised and damaged if the body lacks sufficient antioxidants to buffer or neutralize these cell damaging poisons. Eating alkaline food and drinking alkaline water with alkaline supplements can increase the body’s antioxidants and protect the blood, tissues and organs from toxic acidic waste that many times is NOT properly eliminated through the 4 channels of elimination – urination, defecation, perspiration and respiration.”

To learn more about the health and fitness benefits of an alkaline lifestyle and diet and drinking alkaline water read, The pH Miracle revised and updated – http://www.phoreveryoung.com and https://www.amazon.com/dp/0446556181/ref=sxbs_sxwds-stvpv2_2?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_p=4228958869635247268&pd_rd_wg=B5eWA&pf_rd_r=NZPMZM41PA2N6CP7MQ47&pf_rd_s=desktop-sx-bottom-slot&pf_rd_t=301&pd_rd_i=0446556181&pd_rd_w=P1WJA&pf_rd_i=Robert+o+young&pd_rd_r=df39d0ce-db75-4ecc-8844-0d2a06ebe5e0&ie=UTF8&qid=1531998079&sr=2

 

Elle Macpherson Tests Urine pH Daily

Elle Macpherson carries a pH saliva and urine testing kit in her handbag so she can check the pH values throughout the day

For breakfast Elle will have a green smoothie at 6.15am, consisting of hemp seeds, alkaline water and her own protein powder. At 10.30am, she will have another smoothie if she feels hungry. She will then have a glass of warm alkaline water with lemon juice. Because she has given up coffee, she will add a splash of cayenne pepper if she feels she needs an eye-opener.

No alcohol, almost no carbs, almost no dairy, and no animal protein – Elle’s pH alkaline diet of fruit and vegetables is a perfect healthy regime, and she prefers it to be raw, and where possible, fully vegan.

Lunch is a salad of kale, sprouts, cucumber, cabbage, avocado, pumpkin seeds with olive oil – good fats are important to my wellbeing’. She eats fish, but not chicken, turkey, pork or red meat.

Dinner, eaten shortly after 6pm, consists of vegetable wraps, vegetable pizza or vegetable pasta with pesto.

‘When I feel like having something sweet, I’ll have my favourite dark chocolate or vegan ice cream – sometimes both!’ she said.

She claims that the benefits are huge.

‘My skin glows, my brown spots have faded, the whites of my eyes are clear and my tongue is no longer coated.’

Elle is a devoted a follower is she of the pH Miracle alkaline diet – based on the theory that you can change the pH balance of your body fluids including your blood, interstitial and intracellular fluids through the food and liquids you ingest – that is why she carries a pH testing kit in her handbag so she can check the pH value of her urine at all times. Testing the urine is a measurement of the interstitial and intracellular fluids (not the blood) that makes up over 95% of all body fluids.

‘I believe that most ailments come from having an acidic body,’ she said.

 

She said in an interview: ‘A few years ago, I was feeling really run down, despite living what I thought was a healthy lifestyle and taking an array of synthetic supplements.

She added: ‘For the body to work optimally, the pH of blood sits in a narrow range of between 7.35 and 7.45, which is slightly alkaline, and the body does everything it can to maintain this value. So the message was quite simple: eat more plants, fewer animal foods and to help along the way, take an absorbable alkalinising greens blend.

Always intensely pHysical, Elle continues to work out – often twice a day – to maintain her famously fit body. After breakfast she will do yoga, go jogging or swim. At around 5pm she does a vinyasa yoga class.

She enjoys many sports, including hiking, wake-boarding, cycling, paddle boarding and surfing. All executed in a highly competitive manner.

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‘Another thing I’ve always loved? The thrill of competition,’ she says. ‘If I’m swimming, I like to set myself a goal, whether it’s a number of laps or a certain route or time I have to complete in the session. It makes it more fun!’

To learn more about the pH Miracle watch the following youtube video and read the following books:

How Healthy is Your Blood?

“Scare Forms” “Yeast” & “Parasites” in Live Unstained Blood!

The live blood cell micrograph above is showing a “scare forms” with yeast (Y-form) and a Trypanosoma brucei parasite and always an indication of metabolic acidosis or decompensated acidosis of the interstitial fluids of the Interstitium and blood. (pH below 7.365) These “scare forms” with parasites and yeast are always associated with a serious health challenge and an acidic lifestyle and diet!

Read – Nutritional Cellular Microscopy: Live and Dried Blood Profiles by Robert O Young CPT, MSc, DSc, PhD, Naturopathic Practitioner – To order go to: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01JVK48XE/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_hsch_vapi_taft_p1_i10

The blood micrograph also shows just under the “Scare Form” a Trypanosoma brucei parasite as seen in live human blood through the eyes of pHase contrast microscopy.

If you are eating raw or uncooked meat (beef, chicken, pork) or fish (especially raw) you are at a 99 percent risk for “scare form”, “yeast” and “parasites”.

Blood parasites are at epidemic levels today in the USA and not just in 3rd World countries. To learn more read Sick and Tired, Reclaim Your Inner Terrain by Robert O Young PhD. To order go to: https://www.amazon.com/Sick-Tired-Reclaim-Inner-Terrain/dp/1580540562/ref=la_B001ILKCSU_1_5?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1519008562&sr=1-5&refinements=p_82%3AB001ILKCSU

SuperGreens – The World’s First Organic Vegetable, Fruit and Grass Powder!

InnerLight SuperGreens – by Dr Robert O. Young – The Original Super Greens Powder – 49 Grasses, Leaves, Vegetables, Sprouts & Herbs – Organic & Wild Crafted Ingredients – Great Tasting – No Cameron Fillers

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About the product

ORIGINALLY CREATED IN 1988 by Dr. Robert Young (author of the best-selling pH Miracle books), this product was one of the 1st greens powders on the market and has stood the test of time, helping thousands of people maintain their health.
ALL THE GREENS YOUR BODY NEEDS – InnerLight SuperGreens is a super-concentrated organic combination of 49 different grasses, leaves, vegetables, sprouts, and herbs
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DOES NOT CONTAIN any fillers, artificial sweeteners, colorings, flavorings, additives, preservatives, spirulina, algae, mushrooms or probiotics.
MICRO FINE POWDER that makes it easy to mix with water and consume.
CHILDREN LOVE THE TASTE of the InnerLight SuperGreens powder which gets them started on the road to Optimal Health.

Product description

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 InnerLight SuperGreens is a super-concentrated organic combination of 49 different grasses, leaves, vegetables, sprouts & herbs; all the “greens” your body needs. Originally created in 1988 by Dr. Robert Young (author of the best-selling pH Miracle books), this product was one of the 1st greens powders on the market and has stood the test of time, helping thousands of people maintain their health.
Tony Robbins, internationally known motivational speaker, talked about InnerLight SuperGreens in a 1 1/2 hour “Power Talk” interview he did with Dr Robert Young in the early 2000’s. This helped get the word out about our excellent product.
Tony-robbins
InnerLight SuperGreens powder is a micro fine powder which makes it easy to mix with water and digest. The greens powder smells great and has a mild taste.
InnerLight SuperGreens DOES NOT CONTAIN any fillers, artificial sweeteners, colorings, flavorings, additives, preservatives, spirulina, algae, mushrooms or probiotics. Our product is also formulated with Non GMO ingredients.
SuperGreens powder has four times the power of ordinary green powders. Drinking InnerLight SuperGreens is the quickest way to get a high concentration of chlorophyll which can assist with building healthy cells.
As Dr Young says, “When the Fish is Sick, Change the Water”. SuperGreens is an organic, colloidal, concentrated, charged high frequency food. There is nothing else like it. We invite you to commit to a 120-day program and take your health to the next level.
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If you’re worried that you’re not getting enough greens in, InnerLight SuperGreens is the answer for you.
Try some InnerLight SuperGreens today!
p.s.- We have a “no-quibble guarantee” so you have nothing to lose!
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The pH Miracle of Vitamin D3

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Many years ago a clinical observation published in April 2000 in the Archives of Internal Medicine caught my attention. Dr. Anu Prabhala and his colleagues reported on the treatment of five patients confined to wheelchairs with severe weakness and fatigue. Blood tests revealed that all suffered from severe vitamin D deficiency. The patients received 50,000 IU vitamin D per week and all became mobile within six weeks. [1]

Dr. Prabhala’s research sparked my interest and led me to a search for current information on vitamin D, how it works, how much we really need and how we get it. The following is a small part of the important information that I found.

Any discussion of vitamin D must begin with the discoveries of the Canadian-born dentist Weston A. Price. In his masterpiece Nutrition and Physical Degeneration, Dr. Price noted that the diet of isolated, so-called “primitive” peoples contained “at least ten times” the amount of “fat-soluble vitamins” as the standard American diet of his day. [2] Dr. Price determined that it was the presence of plentiful amounts of fat-soluble vitamins A and D in the diet, along with calcium, phosphorus and other minerals, that conferred such high immunity to tooth decay and resistance to disease in nonindustrialized population groups.

Today another Canadian researcher, Dr. Reinhold Vieth, argues convincingly that current vitamin D recommendations are woefully inadequate. The recommended dose of 200-400 international units (IU) will prevent rickets in children but does not come close to the optimum amount necessary for vibrant health. [3] According to Dr. Vieth, the minimal daily requirement of vitamin D should be in the range of 4,000 IU from all sources, rather than the 200-400 currently suggested, or ten times the Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA). Dr. Vieth’s research perfectly matches Dr. Price’s observations of sixty years ago!

Vitamin D From Sunlight

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Pick up any popular book on vitamins and you will read that ten minutes of daily exposure of the arms and legs to sunlight will supply us with all the vitamin D that we need. Humans do indeed manufacture vitamin D from cholesterol by the action of sunlight on the skin but it is actually very difficult to obtain even a minimal amount of vitamin D with a brief foray into the sunlight. [4][5]

Ultraviolet (UV) light is divided into 3 bands or wavelength ranges, which are referred to as UV-C, UV-B and UV-A. [6] UV-C is the most energetic and shortest of the UV bands. It will burn human skin rapidly in extremely small doses. Fortunately, it is completely absorbed by the ozone layer. However, UV-C is present in some lights. For this reason, fluorescent and halogen and other specialty lights may contribute to skin cancer.

UV-A, known as the “tanning ray,” is primarily responsible for darkening the pigment in our skin. Most tanning bulbs have a high UV-A output, with a small percentage of UV-B. UV-A is less energetic than UV-B, so exposure to UV-A will not result in a burn, unless the skin is photosensitive or excessive doses are used. UV-A penetrates more deeply into the skin than UV-B, due to its longer wavelength. Until recently, UV-A was not blocked by sunscreens. It is now considered to be a major contributor to the high incidence of non-melanoma skin cancers. [7] Seventy-eight percent of UV-A penetrates glass so windows do not offer protection.

The ultraviolet wavelength that stimulates our bodies to produce vitamin D is UV-B. It is sometimes called the “burning ray” because it is the primary cause of sunburn (erythema).

However, UV-B initiates beneficial responses, stimulating the production of vitamin D that the body uses in many important processes. Although UV-B causes sunburn, it also causes special skin cells called melanocytes to produce melanin, which is protective. UV-B also stimulates the production of Melanocyte.

Vitamin D3, an important vitamin in weight loss and energy production. [8]

The reason it is difficult to get adequate vitamin D from sunlight is that while UV-A is present throughout the day, the amount of UV-B present has to do with the angle of the sun’s rays. Thus, UV-B is present only during midday hours at higher latitudes, and only with significant intensity in temperate or tropical latitudes. Only 5 percent of the UV-B light range goes through glass and it does not penetrate clouds, smog or fog.

Sun exposure at higher latitudes before 10 am or after 2 pm will cause burning from UV-A before it will supply adequate vitamin D from UV-B. This finding may surprise you, as it did the me and other researchers. It means that sunning must occur between the hours we have been told to avoid. Only sunning between 10 am and 2 pm during summer months (or winter months in southern latitudes) for 20-120 minutes, depending on skin type and color, will form adequate vitamin D before burning occurs. [9]

It takes about 24 hours for UV-B-stimulated vitamin D to show up as maximum levels of vitamin D in the blood. Cholesterol-containing body oils are critical to this absorption process. [10]

Because the body needs 30-60 minutes to absorb these vitamin-D-containing oils, it is best to delay showering or bathing for one hour after exposure. The skin oils in which vitamin D is produced can also be removed by chlorine in swimming pools.

The current suggested exposure of hands, face and arms for 10-20 minutes, three times a week, provides only 200-400 IU of vitamin D each time or an average of 100-200 IU per day during the summer months. In order to achieve optimal levels of vitamin D, 85 percent of body surface needs exposure to prime midday sun. (About 100-200 IU of vitamin D is produced for each 5 percent of body surface exposed, although we actually want and need a minimum of 4,000 iu.) Light skinned people need 10-20 minutes of exposure while dark skinned people need 90-120 minutes. [11]

Latitude and altitude determine the intensity of UV light. UV-B is stronger at higher altitudes. Latitudes higher than 30° (both north and south) have insufficient UV-B sunlight two to six months of the year, even at midday. [12] Latitudes higher than 40° have insufficient sunlight to achieve optimum levels of D during six to eight months of the year. In much of the US, which is between 30° and 45° latitude, six months or more during each year have insufficient UV-B sunlight to produce optimal D levels. In far northern or southern locations, latitudes 45° and higher, even summer sun is too weak to provide optimum levels of vitamin D. [13][15] A simple UV-B meter is available to determine UV-B levels where you live.

Vitamin D From Toxic Acidic Food that May Cause Sickness and/or Disease

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What my research on vitamin D tells us is that unless you are a fisherman, farmer, or otherwise outdoors and exposed regularly to sunlight, living in your ancestral latitude (more on this later), you are unlikely to obtain adequate amounts of vitamin D from the sun. Historically the balance of one’s daily need was provided by food. Primitive peoples instinctively chose vitamin-D-rich foods including the intestines, organ meats, skin and fat from certain land animals, as well as shellfish, oily fish and insects, all which are highly acidic and compromising to the blood and interstitial fluids. Today, based upon my research all of these foods are unacceptable to the modern palate and are highly acidic.

For food sources to provide us with D the source must be sunlight exposed. With exposure to UV-B sunlight, vitamin D is produced from fat in the fur, feathers, and skin of animals, birds and reptiles. Carnivores get additional D from the tissues and organs of their prey. Lichen contains vitamin D and may provide a source of vitamin D in the UV-B sunlight-poor northern latitudes. [16] Vitamin D content will vary in the organs and tissues of animals, pigs, cows, and sheep, depending on the amount of time spent in UV-B containing sunlight and/or how much D is given as a supplement. Poultry and eggs contain varying amounts of vitamin D obtained from insects, fishmeal, and sunlight containing UV-B or supplements. Fish, unlike mammals, birds and reptiles, do not respond to sunlight and rely on vitamin D found in phytoplankton and other fish. Salmon must feed on phytoplankton and fish in order to obtain and store significant vitamin D in their fat, flesh, skin, and organs. Thus, modern farm-raised salmon, unless artificially supplemented, may be a poor source of this essential nutrient.

Modern diets usually do not provide adequate amounts of vitamin D; [17] partly because of the trend to low fat foods and partly because we no longer eat vitamin-D-rich foods like naturally reared poultry and fatty fish such as kippers, and herring.

Often we are advised to consume the egg white while the D is in the yolk or we eat the flesh of the fish avoiding the D containing skin, organs and fat.

Sun avoidance combined with reduction in food sources contribute to escalating D deficiencies. Vegetarian and vegan diets are exceptionally poor or completely lacking in vitamin D predisposing to an absolute need for UV-B sunlight. Using food as one’s primary source of D is difficult to impossible.

The pH Miracle of Vitamin D3 Leads pH Miracles

Sunlight and vitamin D are critical to all life forms. Standard textbooks state that the principal function of vitamin D is to promote calcium absorption in the gut and calcium transfer across cell membranes, thus contributing to strong bones and a calm, contented nervous system. It is also well recognized that vitamin D aids in the absorption of magnesium, iron and zinc, as well as calcium. And finally, Vitamin D helps to reduce dietary, respiratory, environmental and metabolic acidic waste.

Actually, vitamin D does not in itself promote healthy bones. Vitamin D controls the levels of calcium in the blood. If there is not enough calcium in the diet, then it will be drawn from the bones to help to maintain the alkalinity of the blood plasma and the interstitial fluids of the Interstitium.

Receptors for vitamin D are found in most of the cells in the body and research during the 1980s suggested that vitamin D contributed to a healthy immune system, promoted muscle strength, regulated the maturation process and contributed to healthy glandular function demonstrated by normal or tolerable levels of glandular hormone waste from the function of those specific glands.

During the last ten years, myself and other researchers have made a number of exciting discoveries about vitamin D. We have ascertained, for example, that vitamin D is an antioxidant that is a more effective antioxidant than vitamin E in reducing lipid peroxidation and increasing alkaline buffers that protect against oxidation. [19][20]

Vitamin D deficiency decreases biosynthesis and causes the pancreas to release of insulin as a buffer of excess acidity, including sugar and lactic acids. [21] Glucose intolerance has been inversely associated with the concentration of vitamin D in the blood. Thus, vitamin D may protect against both Type I and Type II diabetes. [22]

The risk of senile cataract is reduced in persons with optimal levels of D and carotenoids. [23]

PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome) has been corrected by supplementation of D and calcium. [24]

Vitamin D plays a role in regulation of both the “infectious” immune system and the “inflammatory” immune system. [25]

Low vitamin D is associated with several autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis, Sjogren’s Syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, thyroiditis and Crohn’s disease. [26][27]

Osteoporosis is strongly associated with low vitamin D. Postmenopausal women with osteoporosis respond favorably (and rapidly) to higher levels of D plus calcium and magnesium. [28]

D deficiency has been mistaken for fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue or peripheral neuropathy. [1][28-30]

Infertility is associated with low vitamin D.3 [1] Vitamin D supports the male and female reproductive system and normal levels of estrogen in men and women. [32] PMS has been completely reversed by addition of calcium, magnesium and vitamin D. [33] Menstrual migraine is associated with low levels of vitamin D and calcium. [81]

Breast, prostate, skin and colon cancer have a strong association with low levels of D and lack of sunlight. [34-38]

Activated vitamin D in the adrenal gland regulates tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate limiting enzyme necessary for the production of dopamine, epinephrine and norepinephrine. Low D may contribute to chronic fatigue and depression. [39]

Seasonal Affective Disorder has been treated successfully with vitamin D. In a recent study covering 30 days of treatment comparing vitamin D supplementation with two-hour daily use of light boxes, depression completely resolved in the D group but not in the light box group. [40]

High stress may increase the need for vitamin D or UV-B sunlight and calcium. [41]

People with Parkinsons and Alzheimers have been found to have lower levels of vitamin D. [42][43]

Low levels of D, and perhaps calcium, in a pregnant mother and later in the child may be the contributing cause of “crooked teeth” and myopia. When these conditions are found in succeeding generations it means the genetics require higher levels of one or both nutrients to optimize health. [44-47]

Behavior and learning disorders respond well to D and/or calcium combined with an adequate alkaline diet and trace minerals. [48][49]

Vitamin D3 and Heart Disease

Our research suggests that low levels of vitamin D may contribute to or be a cause of syndrome X with associated hypertension, obesity, diabetes and heart disease. [50] Vitamin D regulates vitamin-D-binding proteins and some calcium-binding proteins, which are responsible for carrying calcium to the “right location” and protecting cells from damage by free calcium. [51]

Thus, high dietary levels of calcium, when D is insufficient, may contribute to calcification of the arteries, joints, kidney and perhaps even the brain. [52-54]

We have also postulated that vitamin D deficiency leads to the deposition of calcium in the arteries and hence atherosclerosis, noting that northern countries have higher levels of cardiovascular disease and that more heart attacks occur in winter months. [55-56]

Scottish researchers found that calcium levels in the hair inversely correlated with arterial calcium-the more calcium or plaque in the arteries, the less calcium in the hair. Ninety percent of men experiencing myocardial infarction had low hair calcium. When vitamin D was administered, the amount of calcium in the beard went up and this rise continued as long as vitamin D was consumed. Almost immediately after stopping supplementation, however, beard calcium fell to pre-supplement levels. [27]

Administration of dietary vitamin D or UV-B treatment has been shown to lower blood pressure, restore insulin sensitivity and lower cholesterol. [58-60]

The Battle of the Bulge

Did you ever wonder why some people can eat all they want and not get fat, while others are constantly battling extra pounds? The answer may have to do with vitamin D and calcium status. Sunlight, UV-B, and vitamin D normalize food intake and normalize the acid sugar in the blood. Weight normalization is associated with higher levels of vitamin D and adequate calcium. [61] Obesity is associated with vitamin-D deficiency. [62-64] In fact, obese persons have impaired production of UV-B-stimulated D and impaired absorption of food source and supplemental D. [65]

When the diet lacks calcium, whether from D or calcium deficiency, there is an increase in fatty acid synthase, an enzyme that converts calories into fat. Higher levels of calcium with adequate vitamin D inhibit fatty acid synthase while diets low in calcium increase fatty acid synthase by as much as five-fold.

In one study, genetically obese rats lost 60 percent of their body fat in six weeks on a diet that had moderate calorie reduction but was high in calcium. All rats supplemented with calcium showed increased body temperature indicating a shift from calorie storage to calorie burning (thermogenesis). [61]

The Right Fats

The assimilation and utilization of vitamin D is influenced by the kinds of fats we consume. Increasing levels of both polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fatty acids in the diet decrease the binding of vitamin D to D-binding proteins.

Saturated fats, the kind found in butter, tallow and coconut oil, do not have this effect. Nor do the omega-3 fats. [66]

D-binding proteins are key to local and peripheral actions of vitamin D. This is an important consideration as Americans have dramatically increased their intake of polyunsaturated oils (from commercial vegetable oils) and monounsaturated oils (from olive oil and canola oil) and decreased their intake of saturated fats over the past 100 years.

In traditional diets, saturated fats supplied varying amounts of vitamin D. Thus, both reduction of saturated fats and increase of polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats may contribute to the current widespread D deficiency.

Trans fatty acids, found in margarine and shortenings used in most commercial baked goods, should always be avoided. There is evidence that these fats can interfere with the alkaline buffering systems the body uses to convert vitamin D in the liver. [80]

Vitamin D Therapy

In my clinical practice, I test for vitamin-D status in all the extra-cellular fluids first. If D is needed, I try to combine sunlight exposure with vitamin D and Vitamin D3 supplementation.

Single, infrequent, intense, skin exposure to Ultra-Blue Light (www.innerlightblue.com) for only 20 minutes will not cause sunburn and will not suppresses the immune system. In addition, cold-laser ultra-blue light for 20 minutes a day will normalize immune function, enhance NK-cell and T-cell production, reduce abnormal inflammatory responses typical of autoimmune disorders, and reduce occurrences of infectious disease. [26] [67][68-71]

Thus it is important to sunbathe frequently for short periods of time, when UV-B is present, rather than spend long hours in the sun at infrequent intervals. Adequate UV-B exposure or Innerlight Ultra-Blue Light will provide needed Vitamin D for the body and can be achieved in less time than it takes to cause any redness in the skin with direct sunlight. It is never necessary to burn or tan to obtain sufficient vitamin D.

If sunlight is not available in your area because of latitude or season, Ultra Blue Light made by Innerlight Blue (www.innerlightblue.com) can be used to provide a natural balance of Ultra Blue and Ultra Violet Light. Used according to instructions, these cold laser lights provide a safe equivalent of sunlight and will not cause burning or even heavy tanning. Tanning beds, on the other hand, are not acceptable as a means of getting your daily dose of vitamin D because they provide high levels of UV-A and very little UV-B.

If you have symptoms of vitamin-D insufficiency or are unable to spend time in the sun, due to season or lifestyle or prior skin cancer, consider adding a supplement of 50,000 IU daily of Vitamin pH Miracle D3 or use the Innerlight Blue Light for 20 minutes daily. [www.innerlightblue.com]

[Kourtney Kardashian recently treated her followers to a selfie wearing a innerlight blue mask as she underwent blue light therapy.]

Higher levels may be needed but should be recommended and monitored by your health care practitioner after testing serum 25(OH)D.

Supplementation of Vitamin D3 is safe as long as you diet is alkalizing and contains adequate alkalizing minerals such a sodium, calcium, magnesium and potassium that you can supplement by taking the pH Miracle pHour Salts. [www.phoreveryoung.com]

Adequate calcium and magnesium, as well as other minerals, are critical parts of vitamin D therapy. Without calcium and magnesium in sufficient quantities, vitamin-D supplementation will withdraw calcium from the bones and will allow the uptake of toxic minerals. Do not supplement vitamin D and do not sunbathe unless you are sure you have sufficient calcium and magnesium to meet your daily needs. I suggest a minimum of 1,200-2,400 mg of calcium daily. Research suggests that 1,200-1,500 mg is adequate as a supplement for most adults, both men and women. (Magnesium intake should be half that of calcium.) [I would suggest the pH Miracle Mag-Nease taking 1 capsule twice a day with the pH Miracle D3 at least three times a day]

Higher amounts of calcium are important for anyone diagnosed with bone loss. Total daily calcium as a supplement may range from 1,500 mg to 2,000 mg depending on current bone status and your body size. Make the effort to split up your daily dose. Do not take all your calcium and magnesium once a day. A higher percentage of the calcium dose is absorbed if delivered in smaller, more frequent amounts. [82]

Clients on vitamin-D3 therapy report a wide range of beneficial results including increased energy and strength, resolution of hormonal problems, weight loss, an end to sugar cravings, blood sugar normalization and improvement of nervous system disorders.

A paradoxical transient and non-complicating hyper-calciuria (more calcium in the urine) may occur when the program is first initiated. This resolves quickly when adequate calcium and other minerals are consumed. Two other temporary side effects may occur during the first several months of treatment. One is daytime sleepiness after calcium is taken. This usually resolves itself after about one week. The other condition is the reappearance of pain and discomfort at the site of old injuries, a sign of injury remodeling or proper healing, which may take some time to clear up.

Toxicity Issues

Doses used in clinical studies range from as little as 400 IU daily to 10,000-500,000 IU, given either as a single onetime dose or daily, weekly or monthly. Such large doses are given either as a prophylactic or because compliance is considered a problem. There seems to be some evidence that vitamin D works better, without toxicity, when given in lower, more physiologic doses of 2,000-4,000 IU daily rather than as 100,000 IU once a month. However, a single monthly dose of 100,000 IU did replete low levels of vitamin D in adolescents during winter. [77]

The Many Forms of Vitamin D

There are two types of vitamin D found in nature. Vitamin D2 is formed by the action of UV-B on the plant precursor ergosterol. It is found in plants and in was formerly added to irradiated cows milk. Most milk today contains D3. Vitamin D3 or cholecalciferol is found in animal foods. Both forms of vitamin D have been used successfully to treat rickets and other diseases related to vitamin D insufficiency.

Many consider D3 the preferred vitamin, having more biologic activity. Vitamin D3 as found in food or in human skin always comes with various metabolites or isomers that may have biological benefit.

When humans take in vitamin D from food or sunlight, it is converted first in the liver to the form 25(OH)D and then in the kidney to 1,25(OH)D. These active forms of vitamin D are available by prescription and are given to patients with liver or kidney failure or those with an hereditary metabolic defect in vitamin-D conversion.

Assessing Vitamin D Status

Blood Testing: Currently there are two tests available for physicians to assess vitamin-D status. One is for the somewhat biologically active precursor 25(OH)D and another for 1,25(OH)D, the most active form, which is converted in the kidney and other organs. The latter is often normal in the blood even when the precursor 25(OH)D is low or deficient. The precursor is a better marker of vitamin-D status (or reserves) than the most active 1,25(OH)D form. It is the optimum level of 25(OH)D that is most strongly associated with general good health. (The test values given in this article are for 25(OH)D.) For many years the acceptable level of 25(OH)D has been at least 9 ng/ml (23 nmol/l). Some researchers believe that 20 ng/ml (50 nmol/l) should be the lower acceptable limit72 but Dr. Vieth presents a large amount of data to support his claim that this is far from optimal.3 Optimal levels are certainly at least 32 ng/ml (80 nmol/l) and preferably closer to 40 ng/ml (100 nmol/l).

Salivary pH Testing for calcium sufficiency: A method of assessing ionized calcium levels has been used by Weston Price, DDS and Carl Reich, MD and has confirmation in current research. [73] After determining your serum-D status (testing) and undertaking a program of supplementation with vitamin D3, calcium and magnesium, morning salivary pH should read 6.8-7.8. Lower values may indicate insufficient vitamin D (retest), or low levels of calcium in the diet. Look for pH paper with a range of 5.5-8.0 and increments of 0.2 on our website at http://www.phoreveryoung.com. pH papers with 0.5-degree increments are not sensitive enough to monitor Vitamin D progress.

Research from New Delhi, India is suggesting good results using Vitamin D3 in the prevention and treatment for Pancreatic Cancer and Liver Diseases. Watch the following interview with Robert Young CPT, MSc, DSc, PhD, Naturopathic Practitioner and research scientist Dr.Sargeeta Choudhury on the importance of high doses of Vitamin D3 in the prevention and treatment of pancreatic cancer.

Click here: https://www.youtube.com/edit?video_referrer=watch&video_id=xi14BufojOU

The pH Miracle D3

Recent headlines is now touting vitamin D3 as the new wonder supplement, with claims ranging from its ability to reduce cancer risk to its link to cognitive function in older men. While studies show connections exist, experts debate the amount of vitamin D necessary for optimal health, however.

“Low vitamin D status is linked to a number of different conditions,” said James C. Fleet, Ph.D. professor in the department of foods and nutrition at Purdue University. “These include certain cancers, muscle weakness and types I and II diabetes—possibly even schizophrenia and multiple sclerosis.”

Muscle weakness in cases of low levels of vitamin D may be explained by muscle’s low levels of vitamin D receptors. “Studies with mice show that without vitamin D receptors, cells can’t absorb the vitamin,” said Dr. Fleet. “Research also shows a correlation between high vitamin D status and improved lower body muscle function in men and women over 60 years old.”

Studies also show a decrease in colon cancer with an increase in vitamin D status, and it seems protective against other acidic cancerous risks as well. “One theory is that vitamin D may indirectly inhibit pro-cancer pathways,” said Fleet. “The question is finding the protective level, which remains under some debate.”

Although it remains controversial, 30 nanograms/milliliter (ng/mL) of vitamin D is associated with fewer fractures and falls, according to Karen Hansen, assistant professor of medicine within the rheumatology section at the University of Wisconsin. “Vitamin D deficiency causes osteoporosis by triggering decreased calcium absorption, secondary hyperparathyroidism, increased bone resorption and decreased bone mineral density.” Study variables and inconsistencies make further studies necessary. Currently, 700 to 800 International Units (IU) of vitamin D a day seems most effective.

According to Dr. Young, “recommendations for an “adequate intake” of vitamin D3 should be at 20,000 IU’s per day for maintenance and 100,000 IU’s per day in any acute or chronic condition, including diabetes, MS, heart dis-ease and cancerous conditions.”

download-3

Sources

* UV-B Meter: Sunsor, Inc. (800) 492-9815 Sunsor

* pH Testing Papers: http://www.phoreveryoung.com

* Vitamin D3: (760) 751-8321 http://www.phoreveryoung.com

* Order Blue Light: Innerlight Blue: (760) 484-1075 http://www.innerlightblue.com

* Order pH Miracle D3: phoreveryoung: (760) 751-8321 http://www.phoreveryoung.com

* Order pH Miracle D3: pH Miracle Store: http://www.phmiraclestore.com

* Order pH Miracle D3: pHm Life: http://www.phmlife.com

* Information on Robert O Young: http://www.drrobertyoung.com

*  Health Retreats: http://www.phmiracleretreat.com

References

1. Prabhala A, Garg R, Dandona P. Severe myopathy associated with vitamin D deficiency in western New York. Arch.Intern.Med. 2000;160:1199-203.

2. Price, Weston A. Characteristics of Primitive and Modernized Dietaries. Nutrition and Physical Degeneration. New Canaan, Connecticut: Keats Publishing, Inc 1989:256-81.

3. Vieth R. Vitamin D supplementation, 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations, and safety [see comments]. Am.J.Clin.Nutr. 1999;69:842-56.

4. Glerup H, Mikkelsen K, Poulsen L et al. Commonly recommended daily intake of vitamin D is not sufficient if sunlight exposure is limited. J.Intern.Med. 2000;247:260-8.

5. Glerup H, Eriksen EF. [Vitamin D deficiency. Easy to diagnose, often overlooked (see comments)]. Ugeskr.Laeger 1999;161:2515-21. 6. Diffey BL. Solar ultraviolet radiation effects on biological systems. Phys.Med.Biol. 1991;36:299-328.

7. Moan J, Dahlback A, Setlow RB. Epidemiological support for an hypothesis for melanoma induction indicating a role for UVA radiation. Photochem.Photobiol. 1999;70:243-7.

8. Ranson M, Posen S, Mason RS. Human melanocytes as a target tissue for hormones: in vitro studies with 1 alpha-25, dihydroxyvitamin D3, alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone, and beta-estradiol. J.Invest Dermatol.1988;91:593-8.

9. Sayre, R. M., Dowdy, J. C., Shepherd, J., Sadig, I., Bager, A., and Kollias, N. Vitamin D Production by Natural and Artificial Sources. 1998. Orlando, Florida, Photo Medical Society Meeting. 3-1-1998. Ref Type: Conference Proceeding

10. Holick MF. The cutaneous photosynthesis of previtamin D3: a unique photoendocrine system. J.Invest Dermatol. 1981;77:51-8.

11. Matsuoka LY, Wortsman J, Haddad JG, Kolm P, Hollis BW. Racial pigmentation and the cutaneous synthesis of vitamin D [see comments]. Arch.Dermatol. 1991;127:536-8.

12. Matsuoka LY, Wortsman J, Haddad JG, Hollis BW. In vivo threshold for cutaneous synthesis of vitamin D3. J.Lab Clin.Med. 1989;114:301-5.

13. Season, latitude, and ability of sunlight to promote synthesis of vitamin D3 in skin. Nutr.Rev. 1989;47:252-3.

14. Pettifor JM, Moodley GP, Hough FS et al. The effect of season and latitude on in vitro vitamin D formation by sunlight in South Africa. S.Afr.Med.J. 1996;86:1270-2.

15. Webb AR, Kline L, Holick MF. Influence of season and latitude on the cutaneous synthesis of vitamin D3: exposure to winter sunlight in Boston and Edmonton will not promote vitamin D3 synthesis in human skin. J.Clin.Endocrinol.Metab 1988;67:373-8.

16. Bjorn LO, Wang T. Vitamin D in an ecological context. Int.J.Circumpolar.Health 2000;59:26-32.

17. Xue L, Lipkin M, Newmark H, Wang J. Influence of dietary calcium and vitamin D on diet-induced epithelial cell hyperproliferation in mice. J.Natl.Cancer Inst. 1999;91:176-81.

18. Moon J. The role of vitamin D in toxic metal absorption: a review. J.Am.Coll.Nutr. 1994;13:559-64.

19. Sardar S, Chakraborty A, Chatterjee M. Comparative effectiveness of vitamin D3 and dietary vitamin E on peroxidation of lipids and enzymes of the hepatic antioxidant system in Sprague-Dawley rats. Int.J.Vitam.Nutr.Res. 1996;66:39-45.

20. Wiseman H. Vitamin D is a membrane antioxidant. Ability to inhibit iron-dependent lipid peroxidation in liposomes compared to cholesterol, ergosterol and tamoxifen and relevance to anticancer action. FEBS Lett. 1993;326:285-8.

21. Bourlon PM, Billaudel B, Faure-Dussert A. Influence of vitamin D3 deficiency and 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 on de novo insulin biosynthesis in the islets of the rat endocrine pancreas. J.Endocrinol. 1999;160:87-95.

22. Baynes KC, Boucher BJ, Feskens EJ, Kromhout D. Vitamin D, glucose tolerance and insulinaemia in elderly men [published erratum appears in Diabetologia 1997 Jul;40(7):870]. Diabetologia 1997;40:344-7.

23. Jacques PF, Hartz SC, Chylack LT, Jr., McGandy RB, Sadowski JA. Nutritional status in persons with and without senile cataract: blood vitamin and mineral levels. Am.J.Clin.Nutr. 1988;48:152-8.

24. Thys-Jacobs S, Donovan D, Papadopoulos A, Sarrel P, Bilezikian JP. Vitamin D and calcium dysregulation in the polycystic ovarian syndrome. Steroids 1999;64:430-5.

25. Abu-Amer Y, Bar-Shavit Z. Regulation of TNF-alpha release from bone marrow-derived macrophages by vitamin D [published erratum appears in J Cell Biochem 1994 Nov;56(3):426]. J.Cell Biochem. 1994;55:435-44.

26. Cantorna MT. Vitamin D and autoimmunity: is vitamin D status an environmental factor affecting autoimmune disease prevalence? Proc.Soc.Exp.Biol.Med. 2000;223:230-3.

27. Vogelsang H, Ferenci P, Woloszczuk W et al. Bone disease in vitamin D-deficient patients with Crohn’s disease. Dig.Dis.Sci. 1989;34:1094-9.

28. Bettica P, Bevilacqua M, Vago T, Norbiato G. High prevalence of hypovitaminosis D among free-living postmenopausal women referred to an osteoporosis outpatient clinic in northern Italy for initial screening. Osteoporos.Int. 1999;9:226-9.

29. Glerup H, Mikkelsen K, Poulsen L et al. Hypovitaminosis D myopathy without biochemical signs of osteomalacic bone involvement. Calcif.Tissue Int. 2000;66:419-24.

30. Kyriakidou-Himonas M, Aloia JF, Yeh JK. Vitamin D supplementation in postmenopausal black women. J.Clin.Endocrinol.Metab 1999;84:3988-90.

31. Uhland AM, Kwiecinski GG, DeLuca HF. Normalization of serum calcium restores fertility in vitamin D-deficient male rats. J.Nutr. 1992;122:1338-44.

32. Kinuta K, Tanaka H, Moriwake T, Aya K, Kato S, Seino Y. Vitamin D is an important factor in estrogen biosynthesis of both female and male gonads. Endocrinology 2000;141:1317-24.

33. Thys-Jacobs S. Micronutrients and the premenstrual syndrome: the case for calcium. J.Am.Coll.Nutr. 2000;19:220-7.

34. Garland CF, Garland FC, Gorham ED. Calcium and vitamin D. Their potential roles in colon and breast cancer prevention. Ann.N.Y.Acad.Sci. 1999;889:107-19.

35. John EM, Schwartz GG, Dreon DM, Koo J. Vitamin D and breast cancer risk: the NHANES I Epidemiologic follow-up study, 1971-1975 to 1992. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Cancer Epidemiol.Biomarkers Prev. 1999;8:399-406.

36. Miller GJ. Vitamin D and prostate cancer: biologic interactions and clinical potentials. Cancer Metastasis Rev. 1998;17:353-60.

37. Gorham ED, Garland CF, Garland FC. Acid haze air pollution and breast and colon cancer mortality in 20 Canadian cities. Can.J.Public Health 1989;80:96-100.

38. Kleibeuker JH, Van der MR, de Vries EG. Calcium and vitamin D: possible protective agents against colorectal cancer? Eur.J.Cancer 1995;31A:1081-4.

39. Puchacz E, Stumpf WE, Stachowiak EK, Stachowiak MK. Vitamin D increases expression of the tyrosine hydroxylase gene in adrenal medullary cells. Brain Res.Mol.Brain Res. 1996;36:193-6.

40. Gloth FM, III, Alam W, Hollis B. Vitamin D vs broad spectrum phototherapy in the treatment of seasonal affective disorder. J.Nutr.Health Aging 1999;3:5-7.

41. Fujita T, Ohgitani S, Nomura M. Fall of blood ionized calcium on watching a provocative TV program and its prevention by active absorbable algal calcium (AAA Ca). J.Bone Miner.Metab 1999;17:131-6.

42. Sato Y, Kikuyama M, Oizumi K. High prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and reduced bone mass in Parkinson’s disease. Neurology 1997;49:1273-8.

43. Sato Y, Asoh T, Oizumi K. High prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and reduced bone mass in elderly women with Alzheimer’s disease. Bone 1998;23:555-7.

44. Nikiforuk G, Fraser D. The etiology of enamel hypoplasia: a unifying concept. J.Pediatr. 1981;98:888-93.

45. Taylor AN. Tooth formation and the 28,000-dalton vitamin D-dependent calcium- binding protein: an immunocytochemical study. J.Histochem.Cytochem. 1984;32:159-64.

46. Price, Weston A. Primitive Control of Dental Caries. Nutrition and Physical Degeneration. New Canaan, Connecticut: Keats Publishing, Inc 1989:326-52.

47. Price, Weston A. Prenatal Nutritional Deformities and Disease Types. Nutrition and Physical Degeneration. New Canaan, Connecticut: Keats Publishing, Inc 1989:326-52.

48. Kozielec T, Starobrat-Hermelin B, Kotkowiak L. [Deficiency of certain trace elements in children with hyperactivity]. Psychiatr.Pol. 1994;28:345-53.

49. Starobrat-Hermelin B. [The effect of deficiency of selected bioelements on hyperactivity in children with certain specified mental disorders]. Ann.Acad.Med.Stetin. 1998;44:297-314.

50. Boucher BJ. Inadequate vitamin D status: does it contribute to the disorders comprising syndrome ‘X’? [published erratum appears in Br J Nutr 1998 Dec;80(6):585]. Br.J.Nutr. 1998;79:315-27.

51. Schilli MB, Paus R, Czarnetzki BM, Reichrath J. [Vitamin D3 and its analogs as multifunctional steroid hormones. Molecular and clinical aspects from the dermatologic viewpoint]. Hautarzt 1994;45:445-52.

52. Fujita T, Okamoto Y, Sakagami Y, Ota K, Ohata M. Bone changes and aortic calcification in aging inhabitants of mountain versus seacoast communities in the Kii Peninsula. J.Am.Geriatr.Soc. 1984;32:124-8.

53. Watson KE, Abrolat ML, Malone LL et al. Active serum vitamin D levels are inversely correlated with coronary calcification. Circulation 1997;96:1755-60.

54. Sugihara N, Matsuzaki M, Kato Y. [Assessment of the relation between bone mineral metabolism and mitral annular calcification or aortic valve sclerosis-the relation between mitral annular calcification and post menopausal osteoporosis in elderly patients]. Nippon Ronen Igakkai Zasshi 1990;27:605-15.

55. Segall JJ. Latitude and ischaemic heart disease [letter]. Lancet 1989;1:1146.

56. Williams FL, Lloyd OL. Latitude and heart disease [letter]. Lancet 1989;1:1072-3.

57. MacPherson A, Balint J, Bacso J. Beard calcium concentration as a marker for coronary heart disease as affected by supplementation with micronutrients including selenium. Analyst 1995;120:871-5.

58. Krause R, Buhring M, Hopfenmuller W, Holick MF, Sharma AM. Ultraviolet B and blood pressure [letter]. Lancet 1998;352:709-10.

59. Jorde R, Bonaa KH. Calcium from dairy products, vitamin D intake, and blood pressure: the Tromso Study. Am.J.Clin.Nutr. 2000;71:1530-5.

60. Rostand SG. Ultraviolet light may contribute to geographic and racial blood pressure differences [see comments]. Hypertension 1997;30:150-6.

61. Zemel MB, Shi H, Greer B, Dirienzo D, Zemel PC. Regulation of adiposity by dietary calcium. FASEB J. 2000;14:1132-8.

62. Bell NH, Epstein S, Greene A, Shary J, Oexmann MJ, Shaw S. Evidence for alteration of the vitamin D-endocrine system in obese subjects. J.Clin.Invest 1985;76:370-3.

63. Buffington C, Walker B, Cowan GS, Jr., Scruggs D. Vitamin D Deficiency in the Morbidly Obese. Obes.Surg. 1993;3:421-4.

64. Liel Y, Ulmer E, Shary J, Hollis BW, Bell NH. Low circulating vitamin D in obesity. Calcif.Tissue Int. 1988;43:199-201.

65. Wortsman J, Matsuoka LY, Chen TC, Lu Z, Holick MF. Decreased bioavailability of vitamin D in obesity. Am.J.Clin.Nutr. 2000;72:690-3.

66. Bouillon R, Xiang DZ, Convents R, Van Baelen H. Polyunsaturated fatty acids decrease the apparent affinity of vitamin D metabolites for human vitamin D-binding protein. J.Steroid Biochem.Mol.Biol. 1992;42:855-61.

67. Garssen J, Norval M, el Ghorr A et al. Estimation of the effect of increasing UVB exposure on the human immune system and related resistance to infectious diseases and tumours. J.Photochem.Photobiol.B 1998;42:167-79.

68. Amento EP, Bhalla AK, Kurnick JT et al. 1 alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 induces maturation of the human monocyte cell line U937, and, in association with a factor from human T lymphocytes, augments production of the monokine, mononuclear cell factor. J.Clin.Invest 1984;73:731-9.

69. Aslam SM, Garlich JD, Qureshi MA. Vitamin D deficiency alters the immune responses of broiler chicks. Poult.Sci. 1998;77:842-9.

70. Corman LC. Effects of specific nutrients on the immune response. Selected clinical applications. Med.Clin.North Am. 1985;69:759-91.

71. Muller K, Bendtzen K. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 as a natural regulator of human immune functions. J.Investig.Dermatol.Symp.Proc. 1996;1:68-71.

72. Barger-Lux MJ, Heaney RP, Dowell S, Chen TC, Holick MF. Vitamin D and its major metabolites: serum levels after graded oral dosing in healthy men. Osteoporos.Int. 1998;8:222-30.

73. Rehak NN, Cecco SA, Csako G. Biochemical composition and electrolyte balance of “unstimulated” whole human saliva [In Process Citation]. Clin.Chem.Lab Med. 2000;38:335-43.

74. Talbot JR, Guardo P, Seccia S et al. Calcium bioavailability and parathyroid hormone acute changes after oral intake of dairy and nondairy products in healthy volunteers. Osteoporos.Int. 1999;10:137-42.

75. Heaney RP, Dowell MS, Barger-Lux MJ. Absorption of calcium as the carbonate and citrate salts, with some observations on method. Osteoporos.Int. 1999;9:19-23.

76. Chesney RW. Vitamin D: can an upper limit be defined? J.Nutr. 1989;119:1825-8.

77. Duhamel JF, Zeghoud F, Sempe M et al. [Prevention of vitamin D deficiency in adolescents and pre-adolescents. An interventional multicenter study on the biological effect of repeated doses of 100,000 IU of vitamin D3 (see comments)]. Arch.Pediatr. 2000;7:148-53.

78. Davies PS, Bates CJ, Cole TJ, Prentice A, Clarke PC. Vitamin D: seasonal and regional differences in preschool children in Great Britain [published erratum appears in Eur J Clin Nutr 1999 Jul;53(7):584]. Eur.J.Clin.Nutr. 1999;53:195-8.

79. Mariani E, Ravaglia G, Forti P et al. Vitamin D, thyroid hormones and muscle mass influence natural killer (NK) innate immunity in healthy nonagenarians and centenarians [published erratum appears in Clin Exp Immunol 1999 Jul;117(1):206]. Clin.Exp.Immunol.

80. Enig, Mary G. Modification of Membrane Lipid Composition and Mixed-Function Oxidases in Mouse Liver Microsomes by Dietary Trans Fatty Acids. 1984. University Microfilms International. Ann Arbor, Michigan.

81. Thys-Jacobs S. Vitamin D and calcium in menstrual migraine. Headache 1994;34:544-6.

82. Heaney, RP et al. J of Bone and Mineral Research, 5:11;1990 p. 1135-1137.

Where There Is Salt There Is Life

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Harvested from the sea or wrested from the earth, salt would appear to be one of the humblest commodities. Yet the sodium it contains is a life-sustaining element.

Sodium chloride is essential in the nutrition and physiological processes of all animals including man.

From long before the first written word, there are repeated references in records and stories to the importance of salt as an essential in the daily diet.

Salt has not only ensured the survival of mankind, but colored the species food, religions, politics and superstitions. In ancient times, because of its power to preserve and purify, salt was spilled upon legal documents to symbolize enduring agreement and freedom from deceit. Mans effort to obtain salt can be traced back through history for salt has always been essential to human life.

Salt is more precious than gold

 

Ancient manuscripts tell us that more than 5000 years ago the Chinese obtained salt by boiling and evaporating the ash from seaweed. Later, people along the Mediterranean and Red Seas discovered that when seawater was evaporated by the sun, salt was left behind.

 

This was the start of salt manufacturing and the same method of solar evaporation is used today in the production of many salts around the world.

Roman legionnaires who guarded the Via Solaria, one of the most famous military roads in history, received part of their pay in salt, their ‘salarium.’ From this came the modern word ‘salary.’

 

To this day a good man is ‘worth his salt’ and we take others’ dramatic pronouncements ‘

Many of salt’s applications, including salting of fish and meat to preserve it, have remained almost unchanged down through the millennia. Its place in our superstitions and sayings remains entrenched.

Enshrined in the World’s many cultures and a vital part of global economies, salt is as essential to life as the air we breathe and the water we drink.

Surely there can be no product purer, more natural or environmentally friendly than salt – pure salt water provided and evaporated by Nature, harvested to perfection by Man.

Making salt in open pans is not new. In Mark Kurlansky’s recent book, ‘Salt A World History’, he suggests that in 450 B.C. a Chinese called Yi Duan ‘is believed to have made salt by boiling brine in iron pans, an innovation which would become one of the leading techniques for salt making for the next 2,000 years.’

Rapid boiling is still used today but the open pans have been replaced by closed vessels, outputs have increased and the salt these plants produce has a uniform cubic crystal shape.

In a move back to the open evaporating pans of the past, I developed the Great Salt Lake

North Shore salt beds. The raw material for this salt is the combination of the snow melt run off from theRocky Mountains in northern Utah and the salty North Shore waters of the Great Salt Lake at the base of the Rocky Mountains. These waters are evaporated using the natural processes of sun and wind. From this, a colloidal salt is produced to feed the open evaporating salt beds for making the worlds only 26% colloidal liquid mineral salt we call Young pHorever pH Miracle pHlavor mineral salts!

 

http://www.phmiracleliving.com/phlavor.htm

Interesting Facts About pHorever Young pH Miracle pHlavor Colloidal Mineral Salts

1) Our bodies contain almost 450 grams of salt and each day we need to replenish the salt used by our bodies to maintain our normal health, vigor and alkaline design.

2) Salt plays a big part in helping the body to digest food and turn them into living tissues, as well as helping to transmit nerve impulses that contract the muscles. In order for the cells of the body to function normally, a salt/water balance must be maintained. Salt is also necessary for making the sodium bicarbonate the body needs to alkalize the food we eat to maintaining the alkalinity of the blood and lymph fluids.

3) pHorever Young pH Miracle pHlavor colloidal mineral salt tastes great. Minerals present naturally in the salt from the Great Salt Lake North Shore as well as the crystal shape enhances its flavor therefore the salt can be used more sparingly.

4) pHorever Young pH Miracle pHlavor colloidal mineral salt contains higher levels of calcium and magnesium than normal sea or table salts, as these minerals are also naturally present in the Great Salt Lake North Shore water. Some people believe that this balance of minerals has beneficial effects on the body. Certainly we believe these minerals help enhance the taste of the pH Miracle pHlavor colloidal mineralsalt – taste it and compare to your current salt.

5) When you are tired and/or fatigued and need energy that is the need for salt. All sugar cravings are the need for salt.

6) Salt is the ion of life in which all energy is transported. Without salt there is no life.

7) Salt is what keeps the spirit body connected or joined with the physical body and mental body.

Features and Benefits of pHorever Young pH Miracle pHlavor Colloidal Liquid Salt

1) pHorever Young pH Miracle pHlavor colloidal mineral salt is an evaporated salt that produces a unique three dimensional crystal, it is produced by being very slowly evaporated naturally by the sun, allowing the formation of a 26% concentration of a heterogeneous mineral salt solution. The concentration of this salt is greater then the Dead Sea.

 

2) It is a very light textured salt with a delicate flavor. The taste is created by the unique crystal size and shape of the Young pHorever pH Miracle pHlavor colloidal liquid mineral salt.

3) Excellent for spraying on top of foods as its light texture means it ‘sticks’ better – ideal in particular for salting salads and other vegetables!

4) High surface area and low bulk density improves the product adherence. This makes it ideal for spraying on food or in your mouth directly to begin the alkalizing process.To order your bottle of the worlds first natural colloidal liquid mineral salt spray go to:

http://www.phmiracleliving.com/phlavor.htm

To learn more about the work, research and findings of Robert O Young CPT, MSc, DSc, PhD, Naturopathic Practitioner go to: http://www.drrobertyoung.com

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To register for a health and wellness Retreat go to: http://www.phmiracleretreat.com

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Is Elle 54 Years Old or 54 Years Young?

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As age-defying supermodel Elle Macpherson celebrates her birthday, FEMAIL takes a look at her alkaline lifestyle, diet and fitness secrets that have earned her the nickname ‘The Body’
 
Can YOU say pH Miracle?
 
Elle Macpherson, also known as ‘The Body’, is known for her incredible physique!
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The Super model swears it’s as simple as ‘good nutrition’ and an ‘hour of exercise’!
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She also drinks daily an alkalizing green drink every day, and loves to mediate.
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She follows the example of Tom Brady, David Beckham, Gwyneth Paltrow, Madonna, just to name a few.
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Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
To learn more about the pH Miracle Lifestyle and Diet read The pH Miracle revised and updated by Robert O Young PhD – http://www.phoreveryoung.com
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Could Sodium or Potassium Bicarbonate save your life? Low levels of bicarbonate ‘are linked to a 24 % higher risk of early death!

Could Sodium or Potassium Bicarbonate save your life? Low levels of bicarbonate 'are linked to a 24 % higher risk of early death!

Robert Young PhD

Naturopathic Practitioner – The pH Miracle Ti Sana Detox Medical Spa

Could Sodium or Potassium Bicarbonate save your life? Low levels of bicarbonate ‘are linked to a 24 % higher risk of early death!

  • Compound in baking soda – bicarbonate – reduces early death, study found
  • Baking soda – or sodium bicarbonate – helps regulate pH levels  
  • People with low bicarbonate levels have 24% higher risk of early death
  • People should ingest fruit and green vegetables to get more bicarbonate!

Many of us think of baking soda as little more than a vital part of the recipe to making a cake or baking cookies.

But two new studies have found that the ingredients of sodium and/or potassium bicarbonate plays a far more important role in human health: It can help save lives.

Older people with low levels of sodium and/or potassiumbicarbonate – which is found in baking soda – have a 24 per cent higher risk of dying an early death!

The findings suggest increasing bicarbonate levels can prolong a person’s life.

Study author Dr Kalani Raphael, of the University of Utah, said: ‘What we found was that generally healthy older people with low levels of bicarbonate had a higher risk of death.’

Sodium bicarbonate, a main component of baking powder, reduces the risk of premature death, scientists revealed. Older people with low bicarbonate levels are 24 per cent more likely to die young, a study found

The kidneys and lungs work together by varying the levels of sodium and/or potassium bicarbonate – a base or alkaline compound – and carbon dioxide – an acid – in the blood, interstitial fluids and intracellular fluids.

Sodium and potassium bicarbonate helps keep the body’s pH in a healthy range (7.365), which allows the body cells that make up our organs to work properly.

Critically ill patients with severe acid-base abnormalities have very low levels of sodium and/or potassium bicarbonate and are very unlikely of surviving their illness, according to the study.

RELATED ARTICLES

  • Using Sodium and Potassium Bicarbonate in the Prevention and Treatment of ALL Sickness and Disease – Dr. Robert O. Young – www.phoreveryoung.com 

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Yet, it has been unclear whether more subtle changes to the body’s acid-base status affect the longevity of relatively healthy older people.

A team of scientists investigated how measurements of pH, carbon dioxide and bicarbonate are associated with long-term survival in healthy older people.

They analyzed data from 2,287 participants in the health, aging and body composition study.

That data focused on well-functioning black and white adults between the ages of 70 and 79.

Data started being collected in 1997 – with collection efforts extending through February 2014.

Each of the participants were followed for an average of 10.3 years.

Scientists recommend people with low levels of sodium and/or potassium bicarbonate should increase their intake of foods that produce it in the body, including fruit and green vegetables.

Because of the study’s results, blood bicarbonate concentrations – which are already commonly measured – may allow clinicians to better identify people with a higher risk of premature death.

Those with low sodium and potassium bicarbonate levels may benefit from increasing their intake of foods that produce bicarbonate in the body – including fruit and vegetables, according to the scientists.

The study was published in the Clinical Journal of American Nephrology.  The study by Dr. Robert O. Young has been approved for publication in The International Journal of Complementary and Alternative Medicine.

Read more: http://www.phoreveryoung.wordpress.com

Using Alkalizing Herbs in the Prevention, Treatment and Reversal of Any Cancerous Condition

Dr. Robert O. Young MSc., DSc., Ph.D, ND

“The cure for cancer is found in its prevention NOT in its treatment”  Dr. Robert O. Young

Abstract

An anti-cancer lifestyle and diet is an important strategy you can use to reduce your risk for ANY cancerous condition. The American Cancer Society recommends, for example, that you eat at least five servings of fruit and vegetables daily and eat the right amount of (alkaline) food to stay at a healthy weight. In addition, researchers are finding that certain plant foods or herbs may be particularly useful in protecting and reversing many cancerous condition. The following article covers several of these medicinal herbs and their benefits in the prevention and treatment of brain cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer,  blood cancers,  prostate cancer, oral cancer, liver cancer thyroid cancer, kidney cancer, bowel cancer, stomach cancer, skin cancer and pancreatic cancer.

[Key words; cancer, chemotherapy, herbs, spices, natural cancer treatments, garlic, turmeric, ginger, cayenne, alkalizing, liver disease, oral cancer, prostate cancer, blood cancer, breast cancer, thyroid cancer, stomach cancer, skin cancer, pancreatic cancer, lung cancer, bowel cancer]

Introduction

Make room in your diet for the following foods and drinks to prevent cancer.  Why?  Because an ounce of prevention is worth more than a pound of cure.  The following are eleven herbs or spices that have been shown to be effective in the prevention, treatment and reversal of many cancerous conditions.

Garlic

[Figure 1: Cloves of garlic]

Several large studies have found that those who eat more garlic are less likely to develop various kinds of cancer, especially in digestive organs such as the esophagus, stomach, and colon. Ingredients in the pungent bulbs may keep cancer-causing substances in your body from working, or they may keep cancer cells from multiplying. I recommend a clove a day may be helpful.[1=22 ]

Cayenne Pepper

Most people know cayenne pepper for its spice. But it is actually an extraordinarily strong antioxidant and vaso-dialator. Studies have shown that by consuming cayenne pepper is highly alkaline and a powerful buffer of dietary and metabolic acids that cause cells to become cancerous. If you consume it regularly you can neutralize the acids that cause body cells to become cancerous.[23-29 ]

{Figure 2: Cyenne pepper]

Milk Thistle

Milk thistle is a crucial plant when it comes to liver health and cancer prevention. Milk thistle and the seeds from the plant can be used to eliminate acidic toxins that can bind to the liver, causing damage to the liver setting the stage for a cancerous condition. It protects the alkaline interstitial fluids that surround every body cell protecting them and indirectly preventing the formation of tumors, calcifications and/or cysts which make milk thistle a powerful antioxidant in the chelation of dietary and/or metabolic acids that cause cancer.[30-64 ]

[Figure 3: Milk Thistle]

Turmeric

 [Figure 4: Turmeric root and spice]

This orange-colored spice, a staple in Indian curries, contains an ingredient called curcumin (not the same as cumin) that might be useful in reducing cancer risk. According to the American Cancer Society, curcumin can inhibit some kinds of cancer cells in laboratory studies and slow the spread of cancer or shrink tumors in some animals. Turmeric is easy to find in grocery stores, and you can use it in a variety of recipes.[65-130 ]

Bloodroot

Bloodroot is actually used in a medicine for treating cancer named Black Salve. You can use bloodroot on its own, because it has been shown in tests to be effective in shrinking of tumors.[131-159]

[Figure 5: Bloodroot plant and flower]

Feverfew

Feverfew was used in a study at a university in New York. The study found that it was great at killing off leukemia cells, even better than the actual cancer medication.[160-191]

[Figure 6: Feverfew plant and flower]

Wheatgrass

Consuming one tiny glass of wheatgrass a day either orally or even-better rectally has shown to dramatically increase the health of cancer patients and non-cancer patients alike. It is particularly useful for people who are suffering from the side effects of chemotherapy. It will help purify the blood from dietary and/or metabolic acids, improve blood and lymph circulation, increase the oxygen levels in the microenvironments, and help the body repair and continue to reduce acids loads in the extracellular fluids, interstitial fluids and intracellular fluids to prevent and/or reverse and spoiling of the body cells.[192-204]

[Figure 7: Wheatgrass}

Ruscus Aculeatus

This herb is always known as Butchers Broom and it is great at fighting cancer due to its active ingredient, ruscogenins. The active ingredient has been proven to shrink tumors and increase the cancer fighting cells in the body.[205-221 ]

[Figure 8: Ruscus Aculeatus or Butchers Broom]

Sheep’s Sorrell

Sheep’s Sorrell can be used in people who are suffering the harmful effects of cancer medications. It helps the tissues rebuild and get back to the condition that they were in before the cancer and medication to use it was introduced. Some have suggested that it can be used to ward off cancer cells and keep them from growing.[222-224]

[Figure 9: Sheep’s Sorrel}

Astragalus

This herb is grown in China and has been proven to help with cancer on a couple of different levels. First it boosts your body’s immune system, which in turn helps it identify cancer cells. A study showed that cancer patients who took this herb survived twice as long.[225-250 ]

[Figure 10: Astragalus}

Ginger


[Figure 11: Ginger root]

A new study reveals ginger contains a pungent compound that could be up to 10,000 times more effective than conventional chemotherapy in targeting the cancer stem cells at the root of cancer malignancy. [251]

[Figure 12: Research Shows The Efficacy of Ginger Root as a non-toxic form of chemotherapy]

The authors of the study further affirm these points:

“Cancer stem cells pose serious obstacle to cancer therapy as they can be responsible for poor prognosis and tumour relapse. To add into the misery, very few chemotherapeutic compounds show promise to kill these cells. Several researchers have shown that cancer stem cells are resistant to paclitaxel, doxorubicin, 5-fluorouracil, and platinum drugs [8, 16]. CSCs are thus an almost unreachable population in tumours for chemotherapy. Therefore any compound, that shows promise towards cancer stem cells, is a highly desirable step towards cancer treatment and should be followed up for further development.”

The researchers identified a variety of ways by which 6-shagoal targets breast cancer:

  • It reduces the expression of CD44/CD24 cancer stem cell surface markers in breast cancer spheroids (3-dimensional cultures of cells modeling stem cell like cancer)
  • It significantly affects the cell cycle, resulting in increased cancer cell death
  • It induces programmed cell death primarily through the induction of autophagy, with apoptosis a secondary inducer
  • It inhibits breast cancer spheroid formation by altering Notch signaling pathway through γ-secretase inhibition.
  • It exhibits cytotoxicity (cell killing properties) against monolayer (1-dimensional cancer model) and spheroid cells (3-dimensional cancer model)

It was in evaluating the last mode of 6-shagoal’s chemotherapeutic activity and comparing it to the activity of the conventional chemotherapeutic agent taxol that the researchers discovered an astounding difference. Whereas taxol exhibited clear cytotoxicity in the one-dimensional (flat) monolayer experimental model, it had virtually no effect on the spheroid model, which is a more “real world” model reflecting the 3-dimensionality of tumors and their stem cell subpopulations. Amazingly, this held true even when the concentration of taxol was increased by four orders of magnitude:

 “In contrast [to 6-shagoal], taxol, even though was highly active in monolayer cells, did not show activity against the spheroids even at 10000 fold higher concentration compared to 6-shogoal.”

This is a highly significant finding, as it affirms a common theme in cancer research that acknowledges the primarily role of cancer stem cells: namely, while conventional techniques like surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy are effective at reducing a tumor’s size, sometimes to the point where it is “debulked,” burned,” or “poisoned” out of the body even below the threshold of re-detection, the appearance of “winning the battle” often comes at a steep price, as ultimately the cancer stem cell population regrows the tumors, now with increased vengeance and metastastic invasiveness, resulting in the cancer “winning the war.”

The monolayer model, which does not account for the complex immunity of actual cancer stem-cell based tumors against chemoagents like taxol, represents the old preclinical model of testing cancer treatments. The spheroid model, on the other hand, clearly shows that even 10,000 times higher concentrations of taxol are not capable of beating this ginger component at selectively targeting the root cause of the tumor malignancy.

In their concluding remarks, the authors point out a hugely important distinction between natural anti-cancer agents and conventional ones that have only been introduced in the past half century or so, namely, “Dietary compounds are welcome options for human diseases due to their time-tested acceptability by human bodies.”  

Unlike modern synthetically produced and patented chemicals, ginger, curcumin, garlic, and hundreds of other compounds naturally found in the human diet, have been “time-tested” as acceptable to the human body in the largest and longest running “clinical trials” known: the tens of thousands of years of direct human experience, spanning thousands of different cultures from around the world, that constitute human prehistory. These experientially-based “trials” are validated not by RCTs, or a peer-reviewed publication process, but by the fact that we all made it through this incalculably vast span of time to be alive here today. Consider also that if our ancestors made the wrong dietary choice by simply mistaking an edible berry for a poisonous one, the consequences could be deadly. This places even greater emphasis on how the “time testing” of dietary compounds was not an academic but a life-death affair, and by implication, how the information contained within various cultural traditions as “recipes” passed down from generation to generation are “epigenetic inheritance systems” no less important to our health and optimal gene expression as the DNA in our own bodies.

Ultimately, this new study adds to a growing body of research indicating that cancer stem cell targeting approaches using natural substances present in the human diet for thousands of years are far superior than chemotherapy and radiation, both of which actually increase the relative populations of cancer stem cells versus non-tumorigenic ones.[251]

Cannabis

[Figure 11: Cannabis plant with buds]

Cannabis has been making a lot of noise lately. Multiple states across the United States and countries around the world have successfully legalized medical Marijuana, and the Uruguay parliament recently voted to create the world’s first legal marijuana market.[252-256] This is good news as the health benefits of Cannabis are vast, with multiple medical and scientific studies that confirm them. On the other hand, arguments against the use of marijuana is usually published in Psychiatric journals, which show no scientific evidence that Cannabis is harmful to human health. All psychological evaluations from the intake of cannabis are largely based on assumptions, suggestions and observations (257). When we look at the actual science behind Cannabis, the health benefits can be overwhelming. So what does one who opposes the use of cannabis base their belief on? Nothing, not scientific evidence anyways. The negative stigmatism attached to marijuana is due to it’s supposed psychotropic effects, yet again, there is no scientific evidence to show that marijuana has any psychotropic effects. Nonetheless, cannabis has recently been the focus of medical research and considered as a potential therapeutic treatment and cure for cancer.Cannabis is a great example of how the human mind is programmed and conditioned to believe something. Growing up, we are told drugs are bad, which is true, however not all substances that have been labelled as “drugs” by the government are harmful. Multiple substances are labelled as a “drug” in order to protect corporate interests. One example is the automobile and energy industry, a car made from hemp is stronger than steel, and can be fuelled from hemp alone. Henry Ford demonstrated this many years ago. Hemp actually has over 50,000 uses![258]Let’s take a look at the science behind Cannabis and Cancer. Although Cannabis has been proven to be effective for a large range of ailments, this article will focus mainly on it’s effectiveness in the treatment of cancer. Cannabinoids may very well be one of the best disease and cancer fighting treatments out there. Cannabinoids refer to any of a group of related compounds that include cannabinol and the active constituents of cannabis. They activate cannabinoid receptors in the body. The body itself produces compounds called endocannabinoids and they play a role in many processes within the body that help to create a healthy environment. Cannabinoids also play a role in immune system generation and re-generation. The body regenerates best when it’s saturated with Phyto-Cannabinoids. Cannabinoids can also be found in Cannabis. It is important to note that the cannabinoids are plentiful in both hemp and cannabis. One of the main differentiations between hemp and cannabis is simply that hemp only contains 0.3% THC while cannabis is 0.4% THC or higher. (Technically they are both strains of Cannabis Sativa.)  Cannabinoids have been proven to reduce cancer cells as they have a great impact on the rebuilding of the immune system. While not every strain of cannabis has the same effect, more and more patients are seeing success in cancer reduction in a short period of time by using cannabis.While taking a look at these studies, keep in mind that cannabis can be much more effective for medicinal purposes when we eat it rather than smoking it. Below are 20 medical studies that prove cannabis can be an effective treatment and possible cure for cancer.[ [259-288] Please keep in mind that this is a very short list of studies that support the use of medicinal marijuana. Please feel free to further your research, hopefully this is a good starting point.

Brain Cancer

A study published in the British Journal of Cancerconducted by the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Complutense University in Madrid, this study determined that Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other cannabinoids inhibit tumour growth. They were responsible for the first clinical study aimed at assessing cannabinoid antitumoral action. Cannabinoid delivery was safe and was achieved with zero psychoactive effects. THC was found to decrease tumour cells in two out of the nine patients.[289]A study published in The Journal of Neuroscience examined the biochemical events in both acute neuronal damage and in slowly progressive, neurodegenerative diseases. They conducted a magnetic resonance imaging study that looked at THC (the main active compound in marijuana) and found that it reduced neuronal injury in rats. The results of this study provide evidence that the cannabinoid system can serve to protect the brain against neurodegeneration.[290]A study published in The Journal of Pharmacology And Experimental Therapeutics already acknowledged the fact that cannabinoids have been shown to possess antitumor properties. This study examined the effect of cannabidiol (CBD, non psychoactive cannabinoid compound) on human glioma cell lines. The addition of cannabidiol led to a dramatic drop in the viability of glioma cells. Glioma is the word used to describe brain tumour.  The study concluded that cannabidiol was able to produce a significant antitumor activity.[291]A study published in the journal Molecular Cancer Therapeutics outlines how brain tumours are highly resistant to current anticancer treatments, which makes it crucial to find new therapeutic strategies aimed at improving the poor prognosis of patients suffering from this disease. This study also demonstrated the reversal of tumour activity in Glioblastoma multiforme.[292]

Breast Cancer

A study published in the US National Library of Medicine, conducted by the California Pacific Medical Centre determined that cannabidiol (CBD) inhibits human breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion. They also demonstrated that CBD significantly reduces tumour mass.[293]A study published in The Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics determined that THC as well as cannabidiol dramatically reduced breast cancer cell growth. They confirmed the potency and effectiveness of these compounds.[294]A study published in the Journal Molecular Cancer showed that THC reduced tumour growth and tumour numbers. They determined that cannabinoids inhibit cancer cell proliferation, induce cancer cell apoptosis and impair tumour angiogenesis (all good things). This study provides strong evidence for the use of cannabinoid based therapies for the management of breast cancer.[295]A study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS) determined that cannabinoids inhibit human breast cancer cell proliferation.[296]

Lung Cancer

A study published in the journal Oncogeneby Harvard Medical Schools Experimental Medicine Department determined that THC inhibits epithelial growth factor induced lung cancer cell migration and more. They go on to state that THC should be explored as novel therapeutic molecules in controlling the growth and metastasis of certain lung cancers.[297 ]A study published by the US National Library of Medicine by the Institute of Toxicology and Pharmacology, from the Department of General Surgery in Germany determined that cannabinoids inhibit cancer cell invasion. Effects were confirmed in primary tumour cells from a lung cancer patient.  Overall, data indicated that cannabinoids decrease cancer cell invasiveness.[298 ]A study published by the US National Library of Medicine, conducted by Harvard Medical School investigated the role of cannabinoid receptors in lung cancer cells. They determined its effectiveness and suggested that it should be used for treatment against lung cancer cells.[299 ]

Prostate Cancer

A study published in the US National Library of Medicine illustrates a decrease in prostatic cancer cells by acting through cannabinoid receptors.[300]A study published in the US National Library of Medicine outlined multiple studies proving the effectiveness of cannabis on prostate cancer.[301]Another study published by the US National Library of Medicine determined that clinical testing of CBD against prostate carcinoma is a must. That cannabinoid receptor activation induces prostate carcinoma cell apoptosis. They determined that cannabidiol significantly inhibited cell viability.[302]

Blood Cancer

A study published in the journal Molecular Pharmacology recently showed that cannabinoids induce growth inhibition and apoptosis in matle cell lymphoma. The study was supported by grants from the Swedish Cancer Society, The Swedish Research Council and the Cancer Society in Stockholm.[303]A study published in the International Journal of Cancer also determined and illustrated that cannabinoids exert antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects in various types of cancer and in mantle cell lymphoma.[304]A study published in the US National Library of Medicine conducted by the Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology by Virginia Commonwealth University determined that cannabinoids induce apoptosis in leukemia cells.[305]

Oral Cancer

A study published by the US National Library of Medicine results show cannabinoids are potent inhibitors of cellular respiration and are toxic to highly malignant oral Tumours. [306]

Liver Cancer

A study published by the US National Library of Medicine determined that that THC reduces the viability of human HCC cell lines (Human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line) and reduced the growth.[307]

Pancreatic Cancer

A study published in The American Journal of Cancer determined that cannabinoid receptors are expressed in human pancreatic tumor cell lines and tumour biopsies at much higher levels than in normal pancreatic tissue. Results showed that cannabinoid administration induced apoptosis. They also reduced the growth of tumour cells, and inhibited the spreading of pancreatic tumour cells.[308]

Conclusion

According to a 2004 report by Morgan, Ward, and Barton: “The contribution of cytotoxic chemotherapy to 5-year survival in adult malignancies. … survival in adults was estimated to be 2.3% in Australia and 2.1% in the USA.”Jun 16, 2014[309]

Medical oncologists are a long way from using medicinal herbs as an alternative or primary treatment for cancer.  The research is significant and shows that the medicinal herbs discussed in this article are extraordinary plants and have shown excellent results in the prevention, treatment and reversal of many cancerous conditions.

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– See more at: www.phoreveryoung.com

The Cure for Cancer? That’s an easy question to answer! The Cure for Cancer is Found in its Prevention NOT in its Treatment! – Dr. Robert O. Young

Do you know what rotten apples, grapefruit or bananas look like? If you do then you know what cancer cells look like. Cancer cells are nothing more that healthy cells that are spoiling because of a compromised environment! Look at the picture below and you will see colorized cancerous body cells rotting in their toxic acidic environment.

What compromises the internal environment of a human body that causes body cells to begin spoiling and rotting? The answer is simple! The body’s build-up of acidic metabolic and dietary waste that has not been properly eliminated through the four channels of elimination – urination, defecation, respiration and perspiration!

Cancer is not a noun but an adjective that describes what is happening to body cells in an acidic environment due to an acidic lifestyle and diet. www.phoreveryoung.com
To learn more about Dr. Robert O. Young go to: https://www.linkedin.com/in/drrobertoyoung

Sugar Linked to Breast and Lung Cancer

Sugar Linked to Breast and Lung Cancer
Robert Young PhD

Naturopathic Practitioner – The pH Miracle Ti Sana Detox Medical Spa

Introduction

Sugar is a sad staple in the modern diet. It is controversial, also, with many people saying we’ve overdramatized the detriment from sugar. Many experts noting that “sugar is found in natural foods.” While this does hold true, it is unlikely the sugar in apples is causing our health infrastructure to fall apart. It is more likely the refined, dense sugars found in processed foods. Nothing wrong with a tomato, but ketchup is an entirely different store because it condenses the sugar experience generally in the cancer causing form of high fructose corn syrup..

Sugar Is Making Us Fat and Sick

Sugar is making us fat and sick. Sugar is making us diabetic. And now sugar might be giving women breast cancer. According to a study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, that’s exactly what might be happening.

The findings, published in the Jan. 1 online issue of Cancer Research,demonstrated dietary sugar’s effect on an enzymatic signaling pathway known as 12-LOX (12-lipoxygenase).

“We found that sucrose intake in mice comparable to levels of Western diets led to increased tumor growth and metastasis, when compared to a non-sugar starch diet,” said Peiying Yang, Ph.D., assistant professor of Palliative, Rehabilitation, and Integrative Medicine. “This was due, in part, to increased expression of 12-LOX and a related fatty acid called 12-HETE.”

Past studies have shown a connection between sugar intake and breast cancer, but much of that was focused on sugar causing inflammation, which inevitably stimulates cancer. This current connection, however, as reported by manderson.org, is much more direct.

“The current study investigated the impact of dietary sugar on mammary gland tumor development in multiple mouse models, along with mechanisms that may be involved,” said co-author Lorenzo Cohen, Ph.D., professor of Palliative, Rehabilitation, and Integrative Medicine. “We determined that it was specifically fructose, in table sugar and high-fructose corn syrup, ubiquitous within our food system, which was responsible for facilitating lung metastasis and 12-HETE production in breast tumors.”

Sugar isn’t good for us because it is an strong acid. We can debate this data in terms of legitimacy, but it is difficult to debate the overall dire health implications caused from over-abundance of sugar being ingested. Due to this, it is hardly a point worth debating: Lower your acidic sugar intake, choose natural high fiber low- sugar sources from cucumber, avocado, celery, tomato, lemon, lime, peppers, broccoli, spinach, grapefruit, and coconut.  You will be healthier because you will be less acidic and more alkaline according to my published research.

Citation: Young RO (2015) Alkalizing Nutritional Therapy in the Prevention and Reversal of any Cancerous Condition. Int J Complement Alt Med 2(1): 00046. DOI: 10.15406/ijcam.2015.02.00046

This study, however, is a one of a kind study linking sugar directly to breast and lung cancer. In some ways, it is ground-breaking. From my scientific viewpoint, it is simply another research study validating my 30 years of research that we need to limit any refined sugars, complex locarbohydrates, high-sugar fruit and vegetables.   Especially, stay away from sucrose, maltose, lactose, fructose, and any other sugar that ends in “ose.”  Stay organic and plant-based with high fiber, low sugar  foods and you will lower your risk not only for breast and lung cancer but many more western-diet ailments.

Sugar has long been associated with cancer. The pH Miracle diet (a low carbohydrate and low protein diet) has been linked to preventing and reversing cancer.  The core component being that cancer cells thrive from sugar, which stands to reason that cutting the sugar supply off from what you eat and what you drink may cause cancer cells to shrink and die.

How can you cut down on sugar?

First, understand that sugar is a cycle of addiction exactly the same as cigarette and alcohol addiction. Once you cut ALL sugars out of your diet, you will stop craving them. My research and the research of others backs ups this claim. Low carbohydrate dieters often talk about not “being hungry.” And the truth is, it isn’t that they aren’t hungry, it is just that their body only craves what it needs to survive and thrive. Second, reach for high fiber low carbohydrate solutions. Leafy green salads, sprouts, and grasses, low sugar fruit and vegetables are a great example of a low-carb, high fiber experience. This will release electrical energy in the form of electrons into your body slowly so that you don’t bottom out and end up craving a donut. I like to start my day off with a green drink of spinach, celery and cucumber and a shake with avocado, spinach, celery, cucumber and salt.  You may even want to try a mixed green salad with green olive oil and lemon instead of s sugar-cereal or oatmeal.  Give it a try and feel the energy difference.